Racial profiling has become a major issue in the political field as well as in the area of law enforcement. The huge controversy that has been stirred up on this issue is well earned. The beneficial aspects of racial profiling are strongly supported by statistics that display that racial profiling is an effective measure for fighting crime. However, there are diminishing effects on certain minority groups because of the opinion that minorities are constantly being unreasonably suspected of wrongdoing. Although racial profiling is not the idealistic procedure used to be an effective crime fighting measure, the statistics clearly show the benefits of using it as a factor in fighting crime. The belief that despite the benefits of racial profiling it should be abolished is a preposterous idea and is merely a desire for an unrealistic solution.

Racial profile is a very effective method of fighting crime in the United States. Only because people feel that they are being judged totally by race, when in reality it racial profiling is just one factor used in suspecting a criminal, is not a valid argument for the abolishing of this practice. The statistics clearly show that there are many legitimate reasons to exercise racial profiling. There is no fault in going by the statistics no matter how lopsided they may appear to be in the disadvantage of a particular minority race. There is reason why the police can not be more suspicious of black people when the facts show that twenty-five percent of violent crimes committed in the United States are committee by blacks, when if fact blacks only complete twelve percent of our total population. Such strong statistics give the law enforcement the right to be more suspicious of a black person especially if they are in neighborhood that appears to not fit their character.

Many people try to deny that facts that racial profiling is an effective method in law enforcement, however there is no legitimate argument when so many facts prove otherwise. Even one of the most leading activists against racism, Reverend Jesse Jackson says "There is nothing more painful to me at this stage in my life, than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start to think about robbery and then to look around and see somebody white and feel relieved." This is an excellent example of how racial profiling can't help but be believed and supported by even one of the leaders of African Americans. It is an obvious truth that racial profiling when not taken to extreme is a very useful and beneficial tool to be able to have. Many people also try to use the angle that racial profiling is racial discrimination when in fact it is only a generalization factor and rationalization of the type of person in a particular environment. The argument that racial profile is based on racism is completely false. Facts are facts, and in this particular category they simply show that minority groups in certain areas are responsible for most of the crime in our country.

There is more logic used in the process of racial profiling than only whether or not a person is a certain race. For example, if there is a white person in a black neighborhood that looks like he might be a drug buyer, then police can use that factor along with other suspicious factors to question him. That is not a racist act at all, and this occurs with many different races in many different situations. The Eighth Circuit Court upheld this position by stating, "facts are not to be ignored simply because they may be unpleasant." This simply says that just because the facts may seem to be unfavorable to certain minority groups we cannot ignore their existence. The logic behind the idea of abolishing racial profile is simply someone desiring and solution that is unrealistic. That solution has to somehow have the benefits of racial profiling, but in a manner that does not suggest bigotry towards any race.

Racial profiling is a method that needs to continue to be instituted throughout America today. There is no basis for argument that has legitimate reasons for it to be abolished. Although racial profiling is rarely taken to the extreme of totally using race as a factor, those who do such should be punished accordingly. However, benefits of it in law enforcement are significant enough to justify its continuance. The facts don't lie, certain races commit a majority of the crime in America, therefore, racial profiling needs to continue as a method of determining whether or not a person is criminal suspect.