Jason Douglas Huffman Psychology Web Course 07 November 03 Bipolar Disorder Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, energy, and ability to function. Different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through, the symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide. The good news is that bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead quite productive lives.

Bipolar disorder typically develops in late adolescence or early adulthood. However, some people have their first symptoms during childhood, and some develop them late in life. It is often not recognized as an illness, and people may suffer for years before it is properly diagnosed and treated. Much like diabetes or heart disease, bipolar disorder is a long-term illness that must be carefully managed throughout a person's life.

In an article I found in Psychology today, Bipolar Disorder: Is It Ignored, written by Colin Allen it mentions that this specific disorder goes unnoticed to much of the American public as evidenced by a telephone survey asking respondents about mood disorders. Interestingly enough, almost four out of five Americans did not even consider this a disorder. The aforementioned survey was sponsored by the National Alliance of the Mentally Ill as part of the Mental Illness Awareness Week. The article further mentions that the same respondents could only name just a few symptoms including mood swings as well as bouts of depression. In reality, there are numerous symptoms including: Racing thoughts and talking very fast jumping from one idea to another, unrealistic beliefs in one's abilities and powers, spending sprees, abuse of drugs, particularly cocaine, alcohol, and sleeping medications, as well as denial that anything is wrong just to name a few.

The article in Psychology Today, Bipolar Disorder written by Colin Allen also mentions that bipolar disorder appears late in adolescense, and is marked by extreme shifts in mood, energy, and ability to function. Depression can range from days to months. The disorder affects 2. 3 million people, or 1. 2 percent of the nation. Without treatment, half of those with the disorder develop problems with drug or alcohol abuse.

About 20 percent commit suicide. Jason Douglas Huffman Psychology Web Course 07 November 03 Bipolar Disorder Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, energy, and ability to function. Different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through, the symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe. They can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide.

The good news is that bipolar disorder can be treated, and people with this illness can lead quite productive lives. Bipolar disorder typically develops in late adolescence or early adulthood. However, some people have their first symptoms during childhood, and some develop them late in life. It is often not recognized as an illness, and people may suffer for years before it is properly diagnosed and treated. Much like diabetes or heart disease, bipolar disorder is a long-term illness that must be carefully managed throughout a person's life. In an article I found in Psychology today, Bipolar Disorder: Is It Ignored, written by Colin Allen it mentions that this specific disorder goes unnoticed to much of the American public as evidenced by a telephone survey asking respondents about mood disorders.

Interestingly enough, almost four out of five Americans did not even consider this a disorder. The aforementioned survey was sponsored by the National Alliance of the Mentally Ill as part of the Mental Illness Awareness Week. The article further mentions that the same respondents could only name just a few symptoms including mood swings as well as bouts of depression. In reality, there are numerous symptoms including: Racing thoughts and talking very fast jumping from one idea to another, unrealistic beliefs in one's abilities and powers, spending sprees, abuse of drugs, particularly cocaine, alcohol, and sleeping medications, as well as denial that anything is wrong just to name a few.

The article in Psychology Today, Bipolar Disorder written by Colin Allen also mentions that bipolar disorder appears late in adolescense, and is marked by extreme shifts in mood, energy, and ability to function. Depression can range from days to months. The disorder affects 2. 3 million people, or 1.

2 percent of the nation. Without treatment, half of those with the disorder develop problems with drug or alcohol abuse. About 20 percent commit suicide.