OUR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN African American women have excelled in virtually every arena of the world? s spectrum. Born of a desire to succeed, Maggie L. Walker, Shirley Chisholm, Coretta Scott King and Mya Angelou, to name only a few, are sisters that have paved the way towards excellence and served as role models for an entire nation of free black women in America today. Yet Afro American women still face a myriad of stumbling blocks when trying to crack the glass ceiling of corporate America. Coming from the rear– with respect to rank among black men, white women and white men– black women are making headway in the American business industry. We have always known that we must work harder, think faster, be more creative and accept a great deal more criticism than any other group in order to be as successful as our white counterparts.

We accept this challenge and are hopeful of its possible dividends. Sisters have harnessed information that takes a business and its profit to a maximum, and its error percentage to a minimum. Corporate America is slowly placing more African American women in executive positions because of advanced abilities and leadership skills. The African American woman? s status in society have soared tremendously since the early 1900? s. Before the 20 th century? s midpoint, women were looked down upon and given the treatment of a lesser being. In the sixties, African American women became more outspoken and began to show their strength and value to the world.

African American women throughout the states showed their independence and pride thus breaking the barriers of gender stereotypes. Women in the homes have always been the dominant one in the are of child and, in some instances, income in the black family. The ability to balance home, work and social obligations is an art that black women have been adept in mastering. Juggling the role of wife, mother, nurse, teacher, employee, confidant and friend while trying not to lose their sense of self in the process and holding to their strong beliefs in God.

This alone qualifies her to lead and certainly to hold a seat on any board of corporate affairs. Finally, the African American women must continue to strive for excellence and her rightful place. We have not? arrived? we are? arriving? and that is progress and something to be proud of.