Witchcraft in the Colonies Salem, Massachusetts Thesis-In Salem fear of the different led to mass hysteria and panic, people lashed out blindly and accused the innocent. I. Causes A. by late 1640's witchcraft shifted dramatically 1.

began spinning out of control 2. began rising in accusations. for many years people believed in witches 1. Christianity spread through out early Europe 2.

after spread of Christianity, witches were accused of flirting with the devil. C. accusations were made against almost anyone 1. when a witch was found guilty they would for fit their land 2. land was given to victim II.

People. forty one children claimed to be possesed in Salem 1. twenty six sons 2. sixteen daughters. Neighbor turned against neighbor 1. there was hysteria 2.

afraid of the unknown. Witch hunters 1. searched and found accused witches 2. people often banned from colonies for witchcraft III. Trials and Convictions A. Deaths in Salem 1.

happened because of fear 2. twenty innocent people executed. Early Christian Churches 1. prosecuted many innocent people 2. up to 30, 000 put to death between 1484-1782 C. People often tortured 1.

confessed even if they were innocent 2. confessed to end torture and their life. Many tests to find a witch 1. Pricking a.

poked accused with sharp object. if they felt no pain thet were a witch 2. Water testa. person thrown into body of water (1) sank-innocent (2) floated-witch; put to death Essay: In Salem Massachusetts, fear of the different led to mass hysteria and panic, people lashed out blindly accusing the innocent. By the late 1640's witchcraft shifted dramatically (Karlson 19). Witchcraft began spinning out of control (Karlson 19).

It began rising in accusations (Karlson 19). For many years people believed in witches (212. net). Christian-ity spread throughout early Europe (212. net). After the spread of Christianity witches were accused of flirting with the devil (212.

net). Accusations were made against almost anyone (Karlson 80). When an accused witch was found guilty, they forfeited their land (Karlson 80). The land was then given to the victim (Karlson 80). In 1692 the Salem, Massachusetts incident began (usa 1.

com). Forty one children claimed to be possessed (Karlson 188). Twenty six sons claimed to be possesed (Karlson 188). Fifteen daughters also claimed to be possesed (Karlson 188).

Neighbor turned against neighbor (Linde 2). Eventually hysteria broke out (Linde 2). This happened because the colonists were afraid of the unknown (Linde 2). Witch hunters were also a part in witchcraft (Linde 5).

They searched and found accused witches (Linde 5). People were often banned from colonies for witchcraft (Drett 5). There were many deaths in Salem (Notenstein 21). Twenty innocent people were executed (Notenstein 21).

This happened because of fear (Notenstein 21). There were many early Christian churches that opposed witchcraft (212. net). They prosecuted many innocent people (212. net).

Up to 30, 000 people were put to death between 1482 and 1782 (212. net). People were often tortured to confess (212. net). Some confessed even if they were innocent (212. net).

They confessed to end the torture and his / her life (212. net). There were many tests conducted to find if he / she were a witch (212. net). The first is the pricking test (212. net).

Someone would poke the accused with something sharp on their skin (212. net). If they felt no pain they were a witch (212. net). The second is the water test (212. net).

This is where a person was thrown into a body of water (212. net). If they sank he / she were innocent (212. net).

If he / she floated they were guilty and would be put to death (212. net). Bibliography: Drett, Frederick C. Witchcraft in the American Colonies.

New York: Harvester Press, 1968. web arachne / text /t. hist. html web Carol F.

The Devil in the shape of a woman. New York: norton, 1987. Linde, Vander L. The Devil in Salem Village.

Brookfield, Connecticut: AMS Press 1992.