Emily Burch ett Seventh Period College English III 17 March 1997 Poes' Tales Survive Many people have adored Edgar Allan Poes' writings and many have hated them. Overall Poe still appeals to a large audience today who enjoy the terror, the excitement, and the unique writing style he influenced and provided for readers all over the world. All around the world Poe influences in all types of writing," For a moment I can see the importance and the influence Poe has had on three French poets, Baudelaire, Mallarme, and especially Paul Valery" (Thomas Stearns Eliot 206). Poes' influence upon the world was strong and important, introducing his own style, unique structure, and appealing ness. Poe had a strong influence upon the developement of popular fiction and detective fiction. Poe and Wilkie Collins are held greatly responsible for developing their own type of detective fiction.

Collins developed the efficient professional policeman st lye, while Poe was famous for his brilliant and eccentric amateur style. Poe chose to make his stories as realistic as he could providing a fascinating and exciting plot. "Poe chooses almost like a rule places his hero in a most extraordinary situation and most extravagant realism" (Dostoevski 61). Many authors have tried to copy the same structure and plots of Poes, not many have been able to succeed. Exciting and fascinating plots are hard to compose. Poe made it look easy to write such detailed and deep stories.

"The excitement of one of Poes best-known poems," To Helen," mounts even as the poets thoughts rise from the Helen he adores" (Regan 4). Just a few of Poes famous and exciting tales are "The Fall of the House of Usher, The Masque of the Red Death, and The Tell-Tale-Heart." Such fascinating stories led to many wonder in how could Poe write exciting stories and be a sane man Still today debates and arguemnets are made about Poes's a nity while composing. These twisted and exciting stories were composed by a man that loved to describe detail after detail, drawing the audience further and further into his plot. Which allowed his imagination to run wild and deep and his ability as a writer to transfer onto paper. That others might get a glimpse of Poes' imagination and his abilities. His ability to create different types of writings was beyond many.

Poe had an ability that allowed him to describe a fictional scene so detailed and real it was hard not to believe that it really happened. His ability allowed him to introduce to the world fictional detective stories and fictional horror tales. The horror tales Poe wrote were gruesome, intriguing, and appealing to a large audience. His audiences often asked themselves, "Is this real or not" Wondering for hours if it was fact or fiction, finally settling that indeed it was all invented by Poes' unbelievable imagination. Poes' imagination allowed him to develope terrifying stories that still appeals to a numerous amount of readers today.

His terrifying tales appeal to so many that enjoy the thrill of horror and shock. Excitment, love, and fear or terror are close knitted emotions. The same kind of emotion that is a result of "fun fear." Fun fear is an emotion that developed from a love of fear. Fear and love are emotions easily confused for one another. "There are two types of love: the sacred and profane kind and the spiritual and sensual" (Lawrence 112). The sensual kind of love apply's to those who enjoy the terror of Poes stories.

In Spiritual love contact is purely nervous. Fear of the lovers are set vibrating in unison, like two instruments. The excitement, of fear, can rise higher and higher, but carry this too far and the excitement will break and bleed. A form of death will set in (Lawrence 112).

Death in Poe's writings appeals to many who read Poes' tales. Poes' writings are still very appealing to all types of people today. His influence on the world has been strong and important. Especially to those who enjoy feeling the thrill of terror, excitment, that Poes' unique writing style has provided. Still toady, all around the world many love to read Edgar Allan Poes' writings.

Works Cited Elliot, Thomas S. , Fyodor M. Dostoeusk, David H. Lawrence. The Recognition of Edgar Allan Poe.

Michigan: The University of Michigan, 1966. Poe, Edgar Allan. The Fall of the House of Usher. -. The Tell-Tale-Heart. -.

The Masque of the Red Death. Reagan, Robert. A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, 1967.