Herbert Hoover was president of the United States of America during the time of the great depression. His ideas of capitalism changed the way the government responded to the great depression. His view was that the government should not directly aid the citizens but the government should help out the businesses and the help would trickle down through the system and eventually help the people. Hoover thought that the government should not support people.

He believed that private charities and local communities should help people, not the federal government. He thought that organizations at a local level could best help the people. Hoover wasn't opposed to all forms of aid however. He was for giving aid or businesses so that when business picked up, more jobs would come forth. Under Hoover, the government took more steps to shape the economy than ever before. Hoover got together many business leaders and asked them to keep up their employment rates and the wages of the workers.

Hoover requested congress to fund public works projects in an effort to aid the people. By creating these projects it helped business by making them produce more materials and it helped the unemployed by creating jobs. Keeping with his policy of not giving direct aid to the people, Hoover denied aid to hard hit farmers. He instead tried to help them by passing the Home Loan Bank Act.

This helped people to buy houses so more people could be put to work making those houses. This act helped to get money flowing through the economy.