On October 27, 1906, a child by the name of Albert Hofmann was born (Albert, 1). This child would grow up to change the world forever. His research would create of subcultures of both the 1970's and 1990's. His discoveries would cause both grief and delight. His work in pharmacology brought the world one of the most terrifying discoveries of the 20 th century, LSD It was a prosaic day in July, 1938 when Swiss chemist, Albert Hofmann, first discovered Lysergic Acid Diethyl amide (LSD). He was hoping to discover a new circulatory and respiratory stimulant, when he stumbled upon one of the world's most horrifying man-made substances; however, when this phenomenon was first tested it had no effects on the lab animals, therefore its study was discontinued.

LSD's study was revived in 1943, when research indicated it could potentially be used as treatment for schizophrenia, due to its similarity in structure to Nicatamide, a chemical found in the human brain, which directly affects the experiences of a Schizophrenic (DEA, 1). On April 16, 1943, while Dr. Hofmann was measuring a fresh quantity of LSD, he accidentally dosed himself and was overcome with confusion. He was then obligated to leave work due to 'a sensation of mild dizziness'; and 'extreme activity of imagination.' ; (Discovery, 2) On April 19, 1943, at exactly 4: 20 pm, Dr. Albert Hofmann ingested 0. 25 mg.

of liquid LSD and journeyed on the first intentional 'acid trip.' ; In 1947, Dr. Hofmann's employers, Sandoz Laboratories, began marketing LSD in Europe. It was introduced into the United States a year later. They advertised it 'as a cure for everything from schizophrenia to criminal behavior, 'sexual perversions,' and alcoholism.' ; (Henderson/Glass, 40) Sandoz Laboratories urged many doctors to experiment with LSD to gain further knowledge of experiences which may occur to a Schizophrenic. The effects of LSD are completely unpredictable.

The user usually experiences wild mood swings and the sensation of feeling multiple emotions at once. Colors seem more intense and objects appear to move in an almost stroboscopic manner. It has also been known for the user to feel as though they are seeing sounds and hearing colors. If a large enough dose is taken, the drug may produce perceptual delusions and hallucinations. Dr. Hofmann wrote about his first 'trip'; : 'I had great difficulty in speaking coherently.

My field of vision swayed before me, and objects appeared distorted like images in curved mirrors. I had the impression of being unable to move... The following were the most outstanding symptoms: vertigo, visual disturbances. The faces around me appeared as grotesque colored masks. Moderate unrest alternating with paralysis, intermittent heavy feeling in the head, limbs, and the entire body as if they were filled with lead... I sho P.