Pervading us with an array of highs and lows, ranging from anger and sadness, to love, joy, and contentment, emotions vividly affect our daily lives. So, unequivocally it could be asked, "Why do emotions exist?" It is possible that the sole, underlying principle of emotions is to create a reaction in people and things in our environment; or perhaps they exist to be our governing channel of communication; or maybe they precisely exist to regulate individual self-confidence and disparage. The theory that emotions have a sole principle to generate reactions amongst people, things, and their environment, is very conceivable. Every emotion has a cause and effect, and frequently, both are a reaction in others around us. Perhaps the emotions that are expressed by the opening individual have no direct affect on that individual, but on others, and the reaction emotions of others are what cause the effects on the individual.

It could be a repetitive chain of events that begins and ends alike. Since emotions are typically needed to communicate successfully, this gives way to the possibility that emotions exist to be our governing channel of communication. The level of understandability and intensity of communication is exceedingly dependant on the amount of emotion used. Emotionless verbal communication is complex to understand, uninteresting and monotonous. Emotionless nonverbal communication is generally next to impossible to comprehend, and is the borderline of understanding and bewilderment. Communication could be straightforwardly thought of as expressed emotion.

Maybe, instead of, or in addition to, having a principle to create reactions and to be a major channel of communication, emotions precisely exist to regulate individual self-confidence and disparage. External, as well as internal, emotions are often used to compliment and criticize a person's own character. Emotions control a person's level of confidence, or lack there of, in their success and individuality. Perhaps this self-determining strength and weakness alike could be the rationale. "Why do emotions exist?" is a question that could be answered with numerous possibilities; each of those possibilities being parallel to other. It could be answered that emotions have a sole, underlying principle to create a reaction in people and things in our environment; or that they exist to be our governing channel of communication; or they precisely exist to regulate individual self-confidence and disparage; or, in an enclosure of all ideas, that emotions exist, not for a sole purpose or principle, but an array as diverse as emotions themselves..