Question: Do you notice any interesting relation between the directions of the changes in velocity experienced by the two pucks? Answer: The directions of the changes in velocity are equivalent in Question: Does there appear to be any interesting relation between the magnitudes of the changes in velocity and experienced by the two pucks? Answer: Question: Can you notice a single "rule" which seems to govern all of our 2 dim collision data? Check your "theory" against the data obtained by all other groups in your laboratory group. Answer: The law of conservation of momentum affirms that in flawless, frictionless, flat conditions the mass ratio and change in velocity should be equivalent. In other words, the momentum in the system should be held constant. In our experiment, for the most part, this law held true. However, our two results were not exactly the same, which may have been caused from a source of error. This source of error may have been due to friction, gravity from the un leveled air table, or human error.

Question: Can you come up with a single "principle" which seems to govern all of your air track and air table results (including all different kinds of interaction, equal and unequal colliding masses, and all kinds of initial conditions)? Answer: The chief fact that seems to govern all of our results from experiment II (Part A and Part B) is that no energy in the system is neither created no destroyed. Conversely, the energy is conserved regardless of the masses and restricted conditions. This is the case for both of the collisions in one dimension as well as both conditions in two dimensions. Furthermore, every action causes an equal, but opposite reaction. This is again true and exemplified in this experiment, which consisted on Part A and Part B..