Jim Casy develops throughout the story of a "we" philosophy and progress's from his "I" philosophy. The Joan family slowly develops this although unknowingly. This results mainly from the relationships formed between the other migrants and their willingness to help one another out. As the migrants progress on their journey, their concern for the well being of others overshadows their concerns for themselves. They readily make sacrifices to one another and work to create mutual bonds that help one another survive. As the migrants begin to face the all the same hardships and dilemmas, they begin to organize and function as a single unit.

The individuals among this unit are capable of helping one another and advancing the progress off the whole unit. When the workers organize finally and form a picket line outside of Hooper Ranch to protest the establishment of low wages Casey leads this organization. Casy was able to recognize the cruel situation that the migrant's are facing. He sees the low wages that the migrants are being paid, as well as the police's natural dislike towards the "O kies" and their desire to crush any chance they have of organizing.

This is where Casy first realizes that the migrants should attempt to organize to rebel their conditions. His call for a union among the worker's clearly shows his following of his philosophy that the soul is part of a whole. It is not until Casy is put in prison that he is able to come to a full understanding of his views. In prison, he sees the advantage of men organizing and working together to achieve some goal. Once he leaves prison, he attempts to put his thoughts into action by organizing a strike at Hooper Camp. This union is Casey's final attempt at showing the migrants the usefulness of organizing to improve their conditions..