Hume's criticism in regard to the Design Argument, although complex, can be summarized quite simply. It is first important to understand the main elements of the Design Argument. Hume's theory in opposition to that of the Design Argument contests the suggestion that the simple things in the universe must be compared with the greater to appreciate their complexity as a component of the system of the universe. Additionally, Hume considers the introduction of a greater being, such as God, to be irrelevant and untrue through the explanation in the Design Argument itself. The Design Argument implies that the world and its complexities must have been created by a being even more intricate than that of the universe, yet the being itself has no designer.

Hume uses this example to elaborate on the principle that a system or thing can either create itself or has always existed. Ergo, in Hume's opinion, why is there a need to invent a creator when each individual or system can either create itself or has indefinitely existed? Hume's speculations are superior to those of the Design Argument. His criticism is an excellent one. It is true that it may not be agreeable to many that a higher being or creator does not exist and that the components of the universe are self creating.

Still, Hume makes a convincing argument and has very strong points, virtually using the Design Argument against itself. He manages to alter the words of the Design Argument's explanation for a creator by stating that the very incident of a higher being with no origin is proof of self-creation.