At the age of 8, Mormon children decide whether or not they wish to continue in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. That decision is made for life. If the child decides not to become a Mormon then that is respected by his or her parents. However, no decision not to commit is likely as family pressure is great for the Word of God to continue." My day at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was different " The Mormons as do all Christians believe in God the Father, His Son Jesus Christ and The Holy Ghost. By the time a follower reaches university age they can then start missionary work. I suppose your thinking why should they wait as they have made a life decision when he or she was 8.

Well it's because they can go all over the world with some sort of maturity and common sense. The Church has some 60, 000 full-time missionaries serving throughout the world. They are typically young men dressed in a white shirt, black tie and black pants. The missionaries contribute to their own support for up to 18 months and can be anywhere in the world spreading the word of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. During an interview with Mr.

John Glass, a member on the Public Affairs Council for the Church, when asked where he or his family went for their missionary work and was quite surprised to hear "I went to Melbourne but my son went to Canada", a bit too far away for me to be spreading the good word. John and his wife Marlene spoke very passionately about their beliefs and were very open to comparisons with other religions. In comparison to the Catholic religion there is an upside for all those sinners out there- they have no hell. When standing before God in judgment he will not send you to hell instead, he will give you a lower form of Glory. This means that you will be further away from his greatness. The young Mormon men explain this to people when asked.

There are three main questions that Mormons wish to find the answers to, they are called The Man's Search for Happiness- Why are we here? Where did we come from? Where will we go after death? Their Church believes that life is an eternal journey. Before birth or pre-birth they supposedly live in a form of heaven with family and friends until birth, when their pre-birth memory is taken from them to learn knew things as human. When they live out their life and die, all memory that was taken from them in pre-birth is then restored to live as they did before birth. The Mormon Church seeks to find those answers to truly be one with God. After attending a service at the Eight Mile plains church I concluded that I would never transfer to be a Mormon, as the service I went to was the shortest one of three. On Sundays there are three services The Sacrament Reading, Education (Sunday school etc.

) and a meeting or get together of young men and women. The meeting of young people goes for approximately 3 hrs, which I thought about attending but decided not to as I had a few other things to do with my time like homework and SOR assignments. On entering the church I noted no symbols to represent God or that it was a church. This is strange because, as a Catholic, I am used to representations of Jesus Christ on the cross and his resurrection all over the walls. I think Mormons have no representations because of the way in which they pray and express their testimony to the church. Everybody was well-dressed and greeted, with great gusto, my parents and I, probably hoping to get a few new members.

The young men played a big part in the church as they administered communion. Communion was simply fresh bread torn into little pieces and water. They firstly came round with fresh bread and went from row to row offering it to everyone. Then the water came in little cups on very shiny silver tray. During this there was praying from the congregation that sounded like the quiet hum of a vacuum cleaner. Towards the end of the ceremony people out of the congregation get a chance to tell everyone else their stories of how God has helped or touched them.

They also started with the phrase "Dear brothers and sisters." This religion is bordering on being a Pentecostal religion in the way that these people seemed very moved by the speaker telling the story. I was amazed at the number of people who performed testimonies, and with such emotion. Although it was interesting I have no intention of becoming a Mormon, as I would find the missionary work just not to be me.