The version of 'The Wizard of Oz' I'm using and suggesting to use is the digitally remastered THX (R) 50 th Anniversary edition. I do not possess a DVD player yet so I cannot comment on how well it works but I have relieved letters from folks who have DVD and according to them there are no problems. The version of 'The Dark Side of the Moon' that is suggested by The Definitive List is the digitally remastered and repackaged DSOTM with the solid prism / triangle on the cover (seen above) rather than the hollow prism / triangle from the original cover of the album. Both covers by Storm Thor gerson / Hip gnosis (R) (Yes, there are different released versions of both mediums... The earlier version of TWo Oz works best with the original CD release of DSoTM. It's only a matter of a couple of seconds but it does make a slight difference in the first play through and it makes a difference in subsequent's as well.

Some earlier released versions of DSOTM can also be identified by the title sequence. The first song is supposed to be listed as 'Breate' -- of course -- but some over anxious person titled it instead, 'Breathe In The Air'. )? ~ The Setup ~? Firstly if you aren't familiar with Pink Floyd's 'The Dark Side of the Moon (c) ' then SHAME ON YOU! Jes kidd in'... For your penance you must get a copy of the CD even if you never do this synchronicity experiment and listen to it several times and read the lyrics along with it to acquaint yourself with possibly the greatest contemporary music album ever made! It will probably take you a few tries to get the sync lined up just right so be patient. First load the Dark Side of the Moon CD into your CD player and hit PLAY (>) and then immediately hit PAUSE (II) so it is cued up and ready to roll. Be sure also to set your CD player to continuous replay.

This in most CD players is done by hitting the 'REPEAT' button twice. Hitting it once will usually repeat only the presently playing track so hit the button two (2) times and it will replay the CD over and over. The CD will play roughly two and a quarter times through the entire length of the movie. Now start the video and fast forward past all the preview junk (about five minutes worth on the THX version) at the beginning and watch for the THX Digital logo to pop up. Now get the tape to the very beginning where the BLACK & WHITE MGM lion roars. After the BLACK &WHITE MGM Lion roars for the THIRD (3 rd) time IMMEDIATELY hit the play button on the CD player.

Be sure to turn down the sound on the TV because the dialogue and original soundtrack are not necessary for this experiment -- neither should they even be considered. 'The Dark Side of the Moon' will provide all the sound you need. For your most enjoyment make sure you get number one in the list below exactly right. Don't worry if you have to restart it a few times.

The effect is worth the trouble. I have discovered some problems with a few of the compact stereos with the CD player on the top as well as some older models of CD players in that they either do not have a 'repeat' function or the response is a bit delayed. Therefore your results AFTER the first play through will probably vary from this list. A few of those vair ances are mentioned in some places but it would be almost impossible to list all of the variations which can be found with the few CD players out there which have this handicap.

If you will just get the first one listed below correct and you will at least get the FIRST AND BEST play though just fine. Overview Despite all the synchronicities uncovered in the last several years, 'Dark Side of Oz' is, in my opinion, still the reigning queen. The first 34 minutes of DSoO are, by far, the longest and best stretch of pure film / album synchronicity entertainment I've had the pleasure to witness in my years in the business. Almost all the song transitions match up with scene transitions, and most of the lyrics of Dark Side of the Moon can be seen to resonate with simultaneous things happening in The Wizard of Oz movie as well in one way or another. Although you have similar bursts of energies in other sync hs, none appear nearly this sustained or consistent. 'Dark Side of Oz' is simply unique in this way.

Because of my rather esoteric interpretation of 'Dark Side of Oz,' which includes, among other things, a different curing point for the Oz half of the synchronicity and omission of the popular looping method for viewing (see below), I've now (09/25/00) decided to publish my own ' web ', arranged according to Dark Side of the Moon songs and with introductory, italicized lyrics (synced lyrics being underlined). While Shawn Hare has perhaps ' web ' of such matches, a collective effort, I think my own list is a good complement, giving the viewpoint of a single enthusiastic and studious fan instead of a hodgepodge of those most likely not as involved. What's this unique set up then? My set up for 'Dark Side of Oz,' which I think should at least become the standard through the Kansas part of the synchronicity, has three basic ingredients: 1) Use the popular 3 rd lion roar of MGM logo Leo the Lion introducing The Wizard of Oz to start your synchronicity. You can usually set it up fairly well by pausing your Dark Side of the Moon CD at track 1, starting The Wizard of Oz video, and un pausing Dark Side of the Moon right at the end of the 3 rd lion roar. To check this, make sure that: ? Dissolve to Director Mervyn LeRoy screen correlates with transition between 'Speak to Me' and 'Breathe.' ? Gulch first appears, on her bike, at beginning of the bells in 'Time.' ? Dissolve to the interior of Dorothy's farmhouse after Gulch's arrival begins with 1 st chord of 'Time.' All these transitions should match up exactly and precisely. However, the starting point in The Wizard of Oz that gives these line-ups may vary according to the pause release speed of individual CD players.

Also, according to several sources (although I haven't been able to check it myself), some of the older Dark Side of the Moon CDs that have an outlined prism instead of a solid one contain a couple extra seconds at the beginning of track 1. As long as you have the three line-ups above, however, your synchronicity should be right, at least through the Kansas part of the movie (see below). (2) Omit the popular looping method that involves setting the Dark Side of the Moon CD on repeat and letting it run an additional 1 1/2 times through the rest of the movie. In my opinion, 'Dark Side of Oz' properly ends with the Tinman's missing heart symbolically being filled by the ending heartbeat of Dark Side of the Moon, at the end of the first run-through that is. Any match ups that come after this -- and they are sparser in the 2 nd and 3 rd run-through's to be sure -- appear to be anti climatic in comparison. If you desire additional synchronicities beyond the 43 minutes of 'Dark Side of Oz,' try the ' web ' recommended on this site, all of which are excellent in their own ways.

(3) If possible, try the The Wizard of Oz movie version in pre-1989 videotapes, instead of ones released in 1989 or afterwards. The latter group includes the 50 th Anniversary, the remastered 1996 THX versions, and Two DVD, all apparently reflecting a faithful one-to-one correspondence with the original 1939 movie. In comparison, the pre-1989 VHS tapes contain several tiny omissions in relationship to the 1939 film, including 1 1/2 and 3 second cuts at the exact beginning and end of the Munchkinland scenes respectively. Odd as it may sound, these cuts appear to make 'Dark Side of Oz' run quite a bit better through the Oz part of the synchronicity in my own opinion, almost as if they correct refractions in DSoO that begin at Dorothy's entrance into Oz/Munchkinland.

This Kansas-Oz transition in the movie corresponds exactly to the end of side 1 on the original Dark Side of the Moon album, at the end of the song 'The Great Gig in the Sky.' If you have doubts about your version, here is a chart to help you. Tape Contains: You have: Small cuts? Black & White Kansas Pre-1989 recorded version Yes Sepia-toned Kansas 1989 recorded version or newer No Here is also a link to information concerning all ' web ' beginning in 1983 What if I can't find this variation tape (or don't want to bother with it)? The pre-1989 The Wizard of Oz videotapes are actually getting quite hard to find, and the 'Dark Side of the Rainbow' craze of 1997 plays no small part in these tapes' disappearance and / or premature wear. The good news is that their counterparts, the 50 th Anniversary/THX versions and newer, are essentially the same as the pre-1989 s through the Kansas half of the synchronicity... and they also obviously do a fair job through the Oz half as well (otherwise DSoO would have received a lot less fanfare! ). But, in my opinion, it spoils the fun quite a bit if you don't run the synchronicity with these 'refraction corrections' found at the beginning and end of the Munchkinland scenes in the pre-1989 s.

My judgement about this has been echoed by others who " ve looked at both versions of DSoO. Luckily, there is a way to approximate this effect when using the newer The Wizard of Oz tapes to watch 'Dark Side of Oz.' Simply mimic these cuts yourself by pausing Dark Side of the Moon at the end of 'Great Gig in the Sky' for about 1 1/2 seconds, and then again at the end of 'Us & Them' for about 3 seconds (the latter corresponds to the switch between Munchkinland and the Scarecrow's Cornfield). In theory, these pauses would make the 50 th/THX version and pre-1989 version run exactly the same through 'Dark Side of Oz' as far as timing goes. However, you " ll probably have to experiment a little bit to get it just right.

Theoretically you could then just tape this version using a two VCR set up, after getting the timing down. The best test to see if you " ve got the 1 st pause correct is if the first and last rounds of the phrase round and round and round in 'Us & Them' hit exactly on the two turns of Dorothy's ruby slippers (see last part of ' web ' for more on these slippers). There are also numerous other, more minor matches that work better in the songs 'Money' and 'Us & Them' using this 1 st pause. Until further notice, the best test for the 2 nd pause I have devised is Dorothy and the Scarecrow simultaneously pointing to Oz when the word moon is sung in the phrase dark side of the moon in 'Brain Damage' (this is the first of two times the album's title appears in its lyrics). This 2 nd pause appears to make the ending Tinman scenes quite a bit more entertaining... for example, amplifying the climactic conjunction of the Tinman's hollow chest being filled by Dark Side of the Moon's ending heartbeat, as well as making him subsequently seem to whisper the final cryptic sentences of the album to Dorothy ('There is no dark side of the moon really.

Matter of fact it's all dark.' ). What about these long lists of internal 'Dark Side of Oz' matches I've seen at various sites? As mentioned above, I've now created my own list of ' web ', arranged by individual Dark Side of the Moon songs. If you " re really into the synchronicity, I'd advise you to compare this list with Shawn Hare's ' web ', buffeted by numerous contributions from his 'Dark Side of Oz' pals around the Internet. An unknown aspect of 'Dark Side of Oz'? Tell more! My standard answer right now is that it's a secret project.

As stated in the introduction to this site, in the not too distant future I plan to reveal details about this proposed unknown aspect, which I call the 'Rainbow Sphere,' in a separate web site. What its long term effects will be on the synchronicity field I can't tell at this point, but my guess is that they may be somewhat significant. See also my 'Deeper Stuff' page for some additional ideas about this. 1) The first indicator that everything is going right is the change from 'Speak to Me' to 'Breathe' which coincides exactly with the fade-in appearance of the name of producer Mervyn LeRoy. Note: In the prologue the word 'Time' (one of the songs on the CD) is written with a capital letter even though it isn't at the start of the sentence. Also you will find the word 'Heart' capitalized in the middle of a sentence (a sound particular to 'The Dark Side of the Moon').

Note: (OO) As the camera is panning across the landscape and following the path of Dorothy, a large tree is seen and from the lower, main bough of the tree hangs a triangle. The position of it hanging and the horizontal slats of the fence lining up beside it is strangely similar to the cover of DSOTM. 2) 'Leave, but don't leave me... .' Auntie Em appears to say '... Leave... .' to Dorothy and then Dorothy turns to leave looking a bit down in the mouth.

3) Right after the words '... Look around... .' Dorothy looks around. 4) '...

Smiles you " ll give and tears you " ll cry... .' Two men above (Cowardly Lion and Tin Woodsman) are smiling and the man below (Scarecrow) is crying. This one is sort of not on time but worth the mention. 5) '...

All you touch... .' Dorothy touches the man (Cowardly Lion) holding a bucket on his arm. Note: 'All you touch and all you see is all your life will ever be' Dorothy's life will only really be all she touches and all she sees in her Kansas home because Oz exists only in her pretty little head. 6) '...

When at last the work is done... .' the man (Scarecrow) hits his finger with the hammer (to the beat of the drum no less) and is done with his work. 7) (Y) Right after '... Dig that hole... .' the farm hand (Scarecrow) points to the ground as if telling Dorothy to dig a hole. 8) '...

Balanced on the biggest wave... .' Dorothy is balancing herself on the fence. 9) '... Race towards an early grave.' is said at the moment just before Dorothy falls off the fence rail. ['... Down in the pig-pen say in' 'keep on digging'...

.' Lyrics from 'Pigs (Three Different Ones) ' by Roger Waters on the 'Animals' CD]Note: '... Race towards an early grave... .' Perhaps a reference to Judy Garland's untimely death? Note: (E) Judy Garland died in 1969, the same year we put a man on the moon... 'I'll see you on the Dark Side of the Moon.' 10) (C) Song shifts from 'Breathe' to 'On the Run' at the same time (actually just slightly before) Dorothy falls off the fence. Note: (D) At the moment Dorothy falls off the fence rail and the switch to 'On the Run' occurs, the music in that song has an allure of danger as it matches to the mood of the scene and emotion of the other characters as they are concerned with Dorothy's well being and it matches the scene very well. 11) Auntie Em shows up and starts talking exactly at the same time as the woman's voice begins talking during 'On the Run'.

I wonder if anyone knows just what the heck that female voice is saying on the album. It sort of sounds like the overhead voice in an airport to me. I also wonder what kind of cookies Auntie Em has on that plate? 'I've got a clan of ginger-bread man. Here a man, there a man, lot's of ginger bread, man. Take a couple of you wish. They " re on the dish...

.' (' web 'with Pink Floyd from 'Bike') Note: (EE) The voice heard in the background of this portion is indeed someone in an airport (I don't know what the proper title of that person would be -- any help out there? ) and can be heard giving flight information. This audio footage was apparently taken from stock reels in the Abbey Rd Studios which Roger rifled through and felt useful. More information on this and the entire creative process of the DSOTM album which started as a free-form jam and developed into the slick and fabulous album we all know and love. For a song-by-song description and more see the March 1998 special edition of the British music magazine MOJO in which extensive interviews are given with band members as well as Alan Parsons for the 25 th Anniversary of 'The Dark Side of the Moon'.

I haven't read it myself but have a sneaky suspicion it may be the exact same interview I have on MP 3. If I had the room I'd add that interview to this web page but the thing is 33 MB! However I have included some valuable clips from the interview in MP 3 format which you may download and listen to by clicking ' web ' and then clicking on 'Planned or Coincidence?' . 12) (C) During the 'On the Run's equence as Dorothy is singing 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow', the effects sound sort of like helicopters and airplanes are flying overhead & Dorothy's gaze seems to follow one across the screen. Note: 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow', Well, we all know what is found on the infamous cover of DSOTM (a rainbow! ) and here Dorothy is singing about one. Also there are a few fun little rhythm sync hs during this piece such as Toto wagging his tail in time to the clicking sound effect and Dorothy pulling her head towards Toto's during another sound effect and swinging around to another, etc. And then the sort of rumbling sound at the end of the song that for some reason goes along with the sun piercing the clouds in the sky scene.

It gives the feel of a passing thunderstorm. Note: (II) Just before Dorothy begins to sing 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow's he is talking about a place where there is no trouble. She says '... You can't get there by boat or train, it's far, far away, BEHIND THE MOON... ' and of course that would be the DARK side of the moon! Note: (VV) 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow' as compared to the lyrics, '... Over the rainbow, he is crazy', from 'The Trial' on Pink Floyd's 'The Wall'.

'The Dark Side of the Moon' evolved into a concept album centering on the subject of madness, and being 'over the rainbow' is synonymous with going crazy. 13) (AA) At the end of 'On the Run' it looks like Toto is laughing at Dorothy. 14) The chimes in 'Time' go off at the appearance of Mrs Gulch (Wicked Witch of the West) on the bicycle and the chimes stop when she gets off the bike. >>>> 'I've got a bike. You can ride it if you like. It's got a basket, a bell that rings and things to make it look good...

.' (' web ' with Pink Floyd from 'Bike') 15) At the first bass chord of 'Time' the scene changes to inside Auntie Em's house -- really cool! 16) (C) Dorothy and the rest of the cast appear to move and react to the rhythm and mood in particular of the music. 17) '... You fritter and waste the hours in an off hand way... .' Seems to describe the kind of frittered away life that the old maid /witch, Mrs Gulch has if getting rid of poor little Toto is what it takes to make her day.

18) 'Kicking around on a piece of ground in your home town', This is said just a little before Toto jumps out of the basket and onto the ground where he kicks off to go back to Dorothy in his hometown. So it's not exact but worth the mention. 19) '... Waiting for someone or something to show you the way...

.' Toto pops up in the window (perhaps to show Dorothy the way? ). 20) (Q) '... Tired of lying in the sunshine... .' as Toto is lying on the bed with the sun shining in on him witt le fuzzy body. 21) '... You are young and life is long...

.' a reference to Dorothy's youth? 22) '... and there is time to kill today... .' There certainly is time to kill and Dorothy will be present at the death of not one but two people (witches). 23) '... Ten years have got behind you...

.' You see Dorothy's back. (Hence, you are behind Dorothy). 24) '... No one told you when to run... .' Dorothy is running away from home. 25) Guitar solo in 'Time' begins as scene changes (It's so cool when that happens).

26) During the guitar solo of 'Time' the words 'Past, Present and Future' are seen on the sign of Professor Marvel. 27) (D) 'And you run and you run to catch up with the sun but it's sinking; Racing around to come up behind you again!' First think about this: 'Time is a predator which stalks us all our lives.' -- ' web ': Generations... Now take a look above the door mantle as Dorothy enters Professor Marvel's wagon. What do we see but a skull... a reminder of time and the shortness thereof indeed. Kinda funky eh? 28) (X) + (BB) '...

to come up behind you again... .' as Professor Marvel is coming up behind Dorothy. 29) '... But you " re older... .' referring to Professor Marvel's old age? 30) '... Or half a page of scribbled lines...

.' referring to perhaps the photo that Professor Marvel sneaks out of Dorothy's basket? Ok so it's not scribbled lines, but it's a page. 31) '... Hanging on in quiet desperation... .' as Dorothy quietly and desperately listens to the words of Professor Marvel. 32) '... Home, home again...

.' as Professor Marvel tells Dorothy that she needs to go back home. 33) (G) '... Hear the softly spoken magic spell... .' as Dorothy is leaving the 'magic' wagon of Professor Marvel. 34) Song changes to 'The Great Gig In the Sky' the moment Dorothy reaches down and grabs her bag. This begins what is probably my favourite scene in the whole sync h with the tornado and all.

35) (voice says) '... And I am not frightened of dying... .' as the tornado heads towards a house. Note: (U) At the scene of the tornado there is a sound (slide guitar) strangely reminiscent of the old air raid sirens during wartime -- perhaps warning of impending doom via twister (and we ain't talking about a Milton-Bradley (R) game either)? 36) The drums kick in as a tree is uprooted by the winds of the tornado. Note: Right after the tree is uprooted, the singer begins her operatic style wailing which keeps time with the mood and intensity of the tornado scene. Nifty rhythm sync hs are seen during this piece such as the door flying off its hinges and the piece of furniture or appliance falling over on the porch as Dorothy enters the house, etc.

Note: (QQ) During this turbulent scene, the vocals of Claire Torrey at times match the emotional gestures of Dorothy especially when she is screaming in hopes that her folks in the underground storm shelter will let her in. 37) After Dorothy gets bonked on the head with the window Claire Torrey's wailing calms down and Dorothy begins dreaming. Note: The song playing during the entire tornado scene and especially while the house is up in the air via the tornado is 'The Great Gig in the Sky'. Get it? Note: (PP) During the song 'The Great Gig In The Sky' the instrument being played in the foreground is a Hammond B 3 Organ which uses a 'Leslie's speaker. Coincidently, the Leslie speaker makes the sound that it does by spinning inside it's box, using the 'Doppler Effect' to make it sound so cool.

So we have a spinning speaker inside an organ playing music to a tornado scene. Funkadelic man! ? 38) The 'cha-ching!' of 'Money' is heard as Dorothy steps out into colourful, and wealthy looking Much kin Land. Money would be associated with colour and better living as is apparent to Dorothy. 39) (V) 'New car, caviar, four star daydream; I think I'll buy me a football team' Now granted that what an Englishman like Roger would call 'football' is what we in the States call 'soccer' but bear with me a second and notice that the yellow brick road bears a striking resemblance to the spiraling helmet symbol of the Ram's (Los Angeles, Anaheim or St Louis depending on what time you are in). 40) (A) 'Don't give me that do-goody-good bullS Son are walk / skipping to the Wizard, they do so to the drum score at the beginning of 'Time'... really cool! 74) '...

And there is time to kill today... .' as the Wicked Witch seeks to kill Dorothy with the deadly Poppies. 75) '... Shorter of breath and one day closer to death... .' as Dorothy and Cowardly Lion appear to be dead. 76) During this segment the little cries from Clair Torrey seem to go along with the sad hopelessness that Scarecrow is experiencing with Dorothy and Cowardly Lion asleep or dead in the Poppy.

77) (G) '... Home, home again... .' As Tin Woodsman is once at home in being frozen in his rusted state from the snow just as he was when Dorothy found him in the first place. 78) (DD) 'Far away across the field... .' As the 'Fearless Foursome' are in a poppy field and can see the Emerald City across it. 79) '...

Calls the faithful to their knees... .' as Scarecrow falls to his knee upon exiting the poppy field. 80) (NN) '... To hear the softly spoken magic spell.' Right after the magic spell is breathed by Glinda which has awakened Dorothy and Cowardly Lion from their deadly slumber. 81) 'Cha - ching!' when the message SURRENDER DOROTHY is seen in the sky written in the Wicked Witch's smoke. 82) (GG) 'Money' is playing while in the Emerald City -- a reference to the colour of money (American at least) and to the higher standard of living (once again as in Munchkinland) than that Dorothy is accustomed.

Note: During the scene where the 'Fearless Four' (and Toto too) are entering the Temple of the Wizard of Oz there is 'religious's ounding music playing. In fact the working title to this portion of the album was called the 'religious track' by the members of the band while recording DSOTM. 83) (G) 'Black and blue... .' The Wizard is seen in the midst of the smoke and in this instance the smoke appears blue. 84) '... round and round...

.' as we read the sign pointing to the home of the Wicked Witch that says 'If I were you I'd turn back'. Maybe they should turn 'round (? ). 85) (B) 'Listen son, said the man with the gun... .' Scarecrow is carrying a gun.

86) '... Down and out... .' the flying monkeys swoop down to capture Dorothy, and then fly out of the woods with her in their hands. 87) '... With... without...

.' Dorothy is with the flying monkeys, but Tin Woodsman, Cowardly Lion and Scarecrow are without Dorothy... And who " ll deny she's what the fighting's all about? 88) '... You raise the blade... You make the change... .' as the blade of the Lance is raised by Scarecrow, Lion and Tin Woodsman after they have changed into the uniforms of the three unlucky witch's guardsmen. 89) '...

All that you hate and all you mistrust... .' during which the face of the wicked witch is seen. Certainly a mistrustful face if ever there was one. 90) (J) '... And everyone you fight... .' as Tin Woodsman drops the chandelier on the Guardsmen.

? Third Play-Through of CD? 91) (voice says)... .' Live for today, gone tomorrow... .' as the Wizard hands Tin Woodsman his clockwork heart, and then we hear a strange noise that sounds like a rusted metal hinge. Perhaps a prophetic utterance of Tin Woodsman's ultimate demise? Note: (E) During this 'rewards's scene when Cowardly Lion receives his badge of courage, it sounds like military helicopters and war planes flying about. (sort of) Note: (SS) After Scarecrow is handed his 'Doctorate of Thinkology' he says 'The sum of the square roots of any two sides of an isosceles TRIANGLE is equal to the square root of the remaining side.' Of course the triangle being a recurring theme in this synchronicity as well as the image we find on the cover of DSOTM.

92) (JJ) Just as Glinda appears in her bubble the lyrics to the song 'Time' are sung. It's not necessarily a thematic synchronicity but rather a dramatic one with no 'hidden meaning'. 93) (WW) '... Waiting for someone or something to show you the way...

.' Glinda is there to show Dorothy the way back home. ? 94) '... Home, home again... .' after Dorothy has awakened back in her home in Kansas.

95) (P) '... Calls the faithful to their knees... .' as Auntie Em comes to Dorothy with water and is on bent knee. 96) (Z) '... To hear the softly spoken magic spell.' and then Dorothy speaks the magic spell that brought her back home which is 'There's no place like home'. MYSTERY MUSIC? ? ? (HH) Chris Hart reminded me of the music at the end of DSOTM CD.

After you hear 'There is no dark side of the moon really. As a matter of fact it's all dark... .' you can faintly hear some music playing. Strangely enough it's an orchestral version of The Beatles' 'Ticket to Ride'. I know that the members of both Pink Floyd and The Beatles recorded at Abbey Roads Studios and that they at times contributed to each other in one fashion or another and that certainly at times tapes would have been erased and reused. I just can't figure out what the heck an orchestral (it sounds more like MUZAK [elevator music] to me) rendition of 'Ticket to Ride' would even be for.

Does anyone have a clue? If so it would be nice to know. Meanwhile for your convenience ol' Chris recorded the mystery music so you don't have to mess around with reducing the bass on your stereo to avoid blowing your speakers from the heartbeats. Video/Audio Synchronicity vs. Jungian Synchronicity The term synchronicity has an older source than its current use as a byword for dissimilar video and audio match ups. It was originally coined by Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961) to describe a conjunction of two unrelated events, usually occurring at the same time, that appear to create a transcendent meaning beyond the events themselves. Because Jungian synchronicities have no basis in our normal perception of things, they seem magical or supernatural in origin, like personal messages sent to us by some unknown and unseen agent.

Along with many other so-called pseudo scientific ideas, Jungian synchronicity gained popularity in the 1960 s, especially promoted through the book The Roots of Coincidence by acclaimed British novelist Arthur Koestler. More recently, a number of learned scholars have written on the subject, including F. David Peat's Synchronicity: the Bridge Between Matter and Mind and The Philosopher's Stone, and Allan Combs and Mark Holland's Synchronicity: Science, Myth, and the Trickster. These books connect synchronicity to such diverse fields as new physics, chaos math, and classical mythology. A good page with links to Jungian synchronicity sites is ' web '.

The use of the term synchronicity to describe matches between dissimilar film and audio components is an interesting new spin on the word. While some of the most popular and profound video / audio synchronicities can perhaps be fitted under the broader rubric of Jungian synchronicity, most are probably purely of chance origin, their internal matching's illustrating, for example, the well known concept of color ball clustering in gum machines. In addition, there is a slight chance (very slight, in my opinion) that some synchronicities, including the two most glorified examples of 'Dark Side of Oz' and '2001-Echoes,' may have been created on purpose by the involved musical groups. Hypothetically, this would make the two components (or 'events') of a film / album synchronicity intentionally related, and the resulting effect not in the Jungian sense, but causal, or defined by ordinary cause and effect. Furthermore, we have the problem of well defined internal synchronicities within many video / audio synchronicities. There are quite a few of these in 'Dark Side of Oz,' a powerful example being the loud start of bells in Dark Side of the Moon exactly as the character of Miss Gulch is introduced in The Wizard of Oz.

These types of internal synchronicities appear closer in spirit to Jung's usual employment of two simultaneous, pointillistic events for his synchronicities. In contrast, the two components of any video / audio synchronicity are a long sequence of events combining to make a certain movie or album -- like points along a line. Yet despite the difficulties, it must be admitted that 'synchronicity's till seems a quite appropriate label for these sometimes very odd video / audio match ups. Alluding to this same problem in his Synchronicity Arkive, webmaster Mike Johnston summarizes by saying, 'the term seems to describe the emotional state evoked better than anything else.' And it must be admitted this magical feeling, the evocation of wonder and awe, is, after all, the heart of the matter, the fun of it all. Why Pink Floyd? The two most popular synchronicities, 'Dark Side of Oz' and '2001-Echoes,' both use the music of Pink Floyd for their audio components.

The majority of other established synchronicities, such as ones featured in this web site and in The Synchronicity Arkive, also employ Pink Floyd albums. One explanation has it that the band's uniquely slow, fluid style lends itself more easily to soundtrack alternatives than other types of music. Others say Floyd fans, who tend to be a progressive and experimental lot, naturally gravitate toward these types of oddities and thus are predisposed to find them... a type of reading between the lines, if you will. While certainly seeing merit to these theories, my own feeling is that, at the heart of it, something else may be afoot here. To begin with, it seems interesting to me that that the audio components of what are generally considered the two best synchronicities, 'Dark Side of Oz' and '2001-Echoes,' are also commonly called the two best Pink Floyd opuses as a whole, created at the very peak of the group's musical career.

Both the song 'Echoes,' making up side two of the Meddle album, and Dark Side of the Moon as a whole, the next studio album after Meddle, are most commonly identified with this peak. While this proximity may, on the surface, seem to lend credence to some type of Floyd ian intent theory -- having, at its core, the group's purposeful creation of these synchronicities during the general period of 1971-73 -- the presence of two other powerful synchronicities also featured on this site that use the very same two audio components ('Contact-Echoes' and 'Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine') seems to greatly diminish this possibility in and of itself. In short, one really good sync h, outside all other evidence, may point to conscious creation; two really good sync hs overlapping the same piece of music, just by itself, makes this scenario much less likely. Add to this the ample ' web ' of other non-Oz inspirations for the music of Dark Side of the Moon, for example, and the case for intent seems pretty well closed in my opinion.

If we rule out intent for the most popular film / album synchronicities, what is left in terms of present explanatory options are two: chance... and Jungian synchronicity. These are the options also outlined in Mike Johnston's Synchronicity Arkive, the original and still the most popular portal to the film / album synchronicity field in general. Admittedly, even given all the odd match ups found in this field (all the perfect scene shifts in 'Dark Side of Oz,' for example), one cannot really dispel pure chance as the sole reason for any of these types of phenomena presently. At the bottom of it, there are simply too many stretches in any film / album coupling, even in the lofty 'Dark Side of Oz,' where the video and audio components don't match up that well. One possible way out of this dilemma in trying to detect some kind of Jungian synchronicity in odd film / album juxtapositions is to attempt to distill a type of meaning from some of the more profound examples.

As Jung said about traditional synchronicities, although the oddity of the juxtapositions is the most immediately noticeable thing about them, their long terms value hinges upon implied meanings or interpretations, since this is what ties them into his core concept of the individuation process (the psychic growth of the individual over an entire lifetime). In this way, one can perhaps follow up the emotional impact created by film / album oddities with a more mental approach, delving into the possible whys and wherefores of the surreal juxtapositions. Why do these matches stick out above others? What is their relationship to others in the same overall film / album synchronicity? Perhaps in this way the posed question 'Why Pink Floyd?' , in relation to film / album synchronicities as a whole, can lead us into something beyond direct intent and pure chance, or better, between these two extremes. I personally believe the entire 'Dark Side of Oz' complex, including what is its generally unknown but potentially significant aspect in the 'Rainbow Sphere,' may represent a fairly powerful nexus of Jungian style synchronicities, synchronicities very different from the traditional sort. This is because they are, by their very nature, serial in effect, that is, they incorporate many 'little's synchronicities within one overarching phenomena. One can perhaps even see the other ultimate synchronicities of this site arranged around this central 'Dark Side of Oz' complex like accompaniments at a royal court, much like L.

Frank Baum's central country of Oz is surrounded on all sides by supporting fairylands. When the extent of the 'Dark Side of Oz' phenomenon becomes better known, there is a good possibility, in my opinion, that this basic type of arrangement will be illuminated and verified, however odd the idea seems now. Round and Round and Round While I feel it is impossible within present limitations of the film / album synchronicity field to delve too deeply into any possible overall meaning for any synchronicity or group of synchronicities, I would here like to at least attempt a limited exercise in this direction, if only to set some type of pre decent. Let's take as our test subject the phrase 'round and round and round' from the Dark Side of the Moon line 'And in the end it's only round and round and round,' found in the song 'Us and Them.' This line is probably a purposeful allusion on the part of Pink Floyd to the famous Beatles' lyric from Abbey Road, 'And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make,' in essence, the last verse of the Fab Four's career and a summation of their idealistic philosophy. This phrase can also be seen as a microcosm of Dark Side of the Moon itself, with its framework waxing and waning heartbeats that do indeed go round and round when end is recycled back to beginning.

'Round and round and round' is oddly highlighted in the two synchronicities associated with Dark Side of the Moon featured in this site. In 'Dark Side of Oz,' we have the first and last 'rounds' of this phrase falling exactly on two turns of Dorothy's ruby slippers, when they first appear on her feet in The Wizard of Oz. In 'Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine' the phrase is again powerfully highlighted by the turning of a bright red object, this time an abstract rotating cube during the 'Northern Song's equence of the Yellow Submarine movie. Furthering the idea of synchronicity-as-meaning, let's now ask: could there be a possible meaning why the phrase 'round and round and round' is so powerfully highlighted in 'Dark Side of Oz' and 'Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine?' Interestingly, a type of answer to this question can be sketched out, entered through a closer examination of Dorothy's ruby slippers connected with the phrase in 'Dark Side of Oz.' When the slippers first appear on Dorothy's feet in Munchkinland, she has literally just been put into the shoes of a wicked witch (East not West...

but the West wants them! ). The expression 'putting oneself in another's shoes' means you see from another's perspective, understand their motives and actions. This can be seen as a type of empathy which deflates focused negativity, removing one from an emotionally engaging situation. We can theorize Dorothy is magically placed in these shoes to learn this lesson, and she is ultimately allowed to return home only through an understanding of their symbolic power. As Paul Nathanson points out in his book Over the Rainbow: The Wizard of Oz as a Secular Myth of America, Dorothy has, in the movie, already trivialized what seems to be sound advice from farmhand Hunk (the Scarecrow) about how to handle her problems with the witch's Kansas double, Miss Gulch ('When you come home, don't go by Miss Gulch's place. Then Toto won't get in her garden, and you won't get in no trouble...

.' ). She also shows aggressive rage towards Gulch, for example, calling her a wicked witch and shoving her basket at a point where tact is perhaps most needed. The problem appears to be by hating hate, Dorothy descends to the same level as the thing hated; in essence Dorothy and Gulch have emotionally attached themselves to each other, becoming one and the same in this way. The missing ingredient for both is empathy, the ability to step back from an engaging situation and connect with higher thoughts and feelings. Only then can Dorothy see the correct action to take. (Hunk's advise perhaps? ) As the Star Wars trilogy taught us through its Darth Vader character -- a villain, like the Oz witch, covered from head to foot in black -- even the worst of evils has its psychological causes.

Moreover, it can befall any of us, given the proper circumstances. Dorothy must realize that all elements of Oz, whether good or bad, are unconscious aspects of herself, possibilities of herself, just as Star Wars' Luke Skywalker has to face the real possibility of becoming just like Darth Vader in Yoda's Cave (strong with the dark side of the force). For Dorothy, Oz is a similar dream-like stage exposing the moral contradictions hidden in her real life Kansas existence. It turns out in our rudimentary synchronicity experiment here that the empathy symbolized by Oz's ruby slippers, and their accenting in 'Dark Side of Oz' and, vicariously, 'Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine,' can be associated with the idea that everyone and everything in God's green creation shares a common spiritual bond, and that the highest 'up' is ultimately connected to the lowest 'down.' If this is true, then, as Pink Floyd sang over 25 years ago, in the end everything is only round and round and round! 2001-Echoes The most lauded synchronicity outside 'Dark Side of Oz' is one commonly called '2001-Echoes' or 'JaBtI-Echoes.' This synchronicity is created by playing the last section of director Stanley Kubrick's masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey, separately titled 'Jupiter and Beyond the Infinite' -- or JaBtI for short -- with Pink Floyd's psychedelic powerhouse 'Echoes' from their 1971 album Meddle (Floyd's studio album before Dark Side of the Moon). The set-up is very simple: pause 2001 just before the title frame for 'Jupiter & Beyond the Infinite,' pause Meddle at the beginning of 'Echoes,' and un pause both audio and video at the same time. If you do it right, & it's a little hard to goof up on this one if you really try, the beginning of the title frame corresponds exactly with the first 'ping' of 'Echoes.' Also, 'Echoes' and the 2001 movie as a whole should end at exactly the same time using this set-up (creepy huh? ! ).

As far as I know, unlike the components of 'Dark Side of Oz,' there are no variant versions of 2001 or 'Echoes' to complicate matters here. To find out more about this synchronicity visit the 'JaBtI-Echoes' page from Mike Johnston's ' web '. Contact-Echoes Another great synchronicity, and almost a bookend complement to '2001-Echoes,' is a more unknown one called 'Contact-Echoes.' It was discovered by Shawn Hare, who runs one of the best 'Dark Side of Oz's ites. 'Contact-Echoes's ynchronizes the 'second machine's ection near the end of popular 1997 science fiction movie Contact with Floyd's 'Echoes.' This is the part of the movie where lead character Ellie Arrowy, played by Jodie Foster, appears to make contact with beings from the Vega star system. Again the set-up is simple. Un pause 'Echoes' just before Ellie is reunited with her boyfriend Palmer Joss in Japan, right when the door 1 st opens to her quarters after the scene switch (the previous scene is where she is given the suicide pill by site scientists).

You can get some more information about this synchronicity, including a brief analysis, from Shawn's ' web '. In my own opinion, a correct understanding of 'Contact-Echoes' could help elevate the study of video / audio synchronicities to a new level. For one thing (and this is an aspect Shawn really likes), it is the first really profound synchronicity that has no possible chance of being created on purpose by Pink Floyd (Contact being a quite recent movie, unlike The Wizard of Oz or 2001). But it is the comparison with '2001-Echoes' that really interests me. As I have described to Shawn, together their involved components form an almost perfect triangle of relationships.

In connection with this, it almost seems to act as some kind of a causal bridge between '2001-Echoes' and 'Dark Side of Oz,' strange as that may sound! Click ' web ' to read my in-depth analysis of 'Contact-Echoes.' Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine One other synchronicity I want to discuss here is what I call 'Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine,' my own personal find. It synchronizes Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon with the 1969 Beatles animated film Yellow Submarine. While not as strong overall as 'Dark Side of Oz,' which uses the same sound source, it still contains some quite remarkable stretches. And it is one of the few synchronicities in my experience that actually works very well using the repeat mode on a CD player, at least for the first 10 minutes or so of this 2 nd play through. The set up, however, is just a touch tricky.

Pause Dark Side of the Moon at track 1, as you would with 'Dark Side of the Rainbow.' Play Yellow Submarine. At the first frame of the actual movie, (when 'Once Upon A Time... .' appears), reset the timer to 0: 00 and run ahead to about 3: 00. This should be at the point where the Blue Meanies first begin zapping Pepper landers and turning them into statues. When the first Pepper lander is zapped, turning the must ashed figure gray, wait until the scene changes again just a second later -- to a giant Sgt. Pepper head which also subsequently gets zapped and sinks into the ground -- and immediately reset the timer to 0: 00.

Now run Yellow Submarine back about 10 seconds or so, hit play, and un pause Dark Side of the Moon when the VCR timer hits 0: 00. A good test to see if you got it right is if the sculpted word 'KNOW' changes to 'NOW' at the transition between the songs 'Speak to Me' and 'Breathe.' Another test further along is when the Liverpool smokestacks should go off with the previously discussed bells in 'Time' Again, as with the very similar Gulch-bells synchronicity in DSoO, this match-up should be precise! If you want to simply watch the 2 nd run through of 'Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine,' un pause Dark Side of the Moon, again at beginning of track 1, right when Ringo clasps the Nowhere Man's hand (to take him somewhere) at the end of the Nowhere land scenes. Stop the synchronicity when reaching Pepper land or shortly thereafter. 'Dark Side of the Yellow Submarine' offers a great alternative to 'Dark Side of Oz,' and is, in my opinion, much more entertaining than simply watching the 2 nd and 3 rd run-through's of the latter. Be patient through the couple of dead parts, for the live ones are well worth it! This is absolutely awesome! ! ! The visual and the audio mix coupled with, and this is very important, the amazing correlation between the lyrical content of '2112' with the storyline from 'Willy Wonka... .' is profound.

And I'm not just talking about the song '2112' proper; the mix remains in tact throughout the five (5) remaining songs on the album. All in all, thus far at least, 39 minutes that will leave you reeling. To get the sync perfect, follow these instructions carefully: 1. ) Obviously, you need Rush's '2112' CD and 'Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory' on video or DVD. 2. ) Set the Rush CD up first by pushing play then pause so that the song is all cued up and ready to go.

3. ) Make sure the volume on your television is turned down, not muted (unless you want closed-captioned dialogue). 4. ) Then fast-forward the film from the beginning... on my tape, this is where the Warner Brothers logo fades completely to black just before the first frame of swirly chocolate comes to light...

to the scene where Willy Wonka is exiting the factory in the morning to greet the guests (exact time coming soon). This is approximately 44 minutes and 50 seconds from the beginning. Willy is walking with a faux limp and cane... as he walks the cane gets stuck upright in the sidewalk, but he continues walking... you " ll see that he grasps the air TWICE as if reaching for his cane... the split second he finishes his 2 nd grasp of air, start '2112'.

? Syncs begin occuring immediately... here's the list as of 9/7/99. In the last day and a half, I've gone through this thing FIVE times and I know that there are still many more than what's listed here... As the swirly, s pacy noises of the 'Overture' passage of the song begins, Willy does his somersault and the crowd goes nuts... Various musical passages and 'phases' coincide with body and facial movements on screen. Here's a few examples: .

Greeting of the guests at the gate is pretty interesting... Shouting amongst the actors goes nicely with the various instruments. Watch the scene where the 'hat & coat racks' grab the guests garb... As Willy draws back the curtain to reveal the poster board sized contract the kids must sign to get in, Alex's guitar solo near the end of 'Overture' kicks in...

Charlie is signing the contract as the first words of the song are uttered: 'And the meek shall inherit the earth... .' . Then 'Temples Of Syrinx' begins exactly when the contract signing is over and the entourage makes their way to the hallway... The lyrics 'One for all and all for one, we work together common son... .' are sung while everyone are pushing and shoving inside the 'miniature' hallway... 'Temples Of Syrinx' ends...

.' Discovery' begins exactly when the large door is open into the candy paradise. Needless to say, the waterfall sounds on the song, coupled once again with the lyrics, is an amazing display when see in this light... Actions, music, and lyrics continue to coincide: . Willy's cane action is in sync with the acoustic guitar.

As the lyrics 'What can this strange device be, when I touch it it gives forth a sound' are sang, Willy touches the little gunslinger's hair and strokes it, then: . As the lyrics 'It's got wires that vibrate and give music' are uttered, Willy plucks a hair from the boy's head and let's it flutter to the ground... As the entourage makes their way to the bottom of the steps, Willy bows and the guests disperse into the paradise exactly the moment the guitar picks up its tempo... The lyrics '... and notes that fall gently like rain... .' coincide exactly with Willy shaking a tree with his cane and gumballs fall...

During both the 'Presentation' and 'Oracle: The Dream' passages of the song, the lyrics sing of the ancient history of the story, while at the same time on screen, Willy relates the tale of the Oompah Loompahs ('Presentation') and the Oompah Loompahs exit into the underground... 'Oracle: The Dream' ends... .'s oliloquy' begins exactly as the boat on the river appears from out of a tunnel. Willy and the guests climb aboard and slowly start floating... 'Soliloquy' ends...

.' The Grand Finale' begins exactly as the boat enters the tunnel. If you are already familiar with '2112' (assuming that everyone reading this is already familiar with Willy), you know that the fast tempo of the music here is made infinitely more intense by the trippe show that appears in the tunnel! ! ! . As the music becomes increasingly more intense, building to its bombastic conclusion, Willy's face becomes 'WILDER' (sorry, I had to do it! )... the light show in the tunnel is especially in sync with the music! The synthetic voice at the end says 'Attention all planets of the solar federation...

.' four (4) times... then: . Right as the words 'We have assumed control' are uttered for the first (1 st) time, the strange and trippe boat ride suddenly ends. The song's remaining few seconds grinds to halt. You will simply be exhausted, but press on... Here's an interesting side note about the last lines of the song: 'Attention all planets of the solar federation' is said a total of THREE times...

There are seven (7) words in that line Seven times Three (7 x 3) equals = 21 'We have assumed control' is said a total of THREE times... There are four (4) words in that line Four times Three (4 x 3) equals = 12 2112 HOWEVER, the fun doesn't stop there! ! . As 'A Passage To Bangkok' begins, the first words of the song are 'Our first stop is in Bogata'... coincides pretty nicely with the passengers exiting the boat! . 'A Passage To Bangkok' is about visiting 'ports of call' (Lebanon, Afghanistan, Katmandu, just to name a few) in search of the best quality marijuana. It's ironic to hear lyrics like 'Wreathed in smoke...

.' and 'Smoke rings fill the air... .' with the smoke coming from various machines inside the laboratory. Pay attention to the smoke rings coming from one particular machine... 'The Twilight Zone' plays during the Everlasting Gobstopper scene. If you recall, Mr. Slug worth was supposedly wanting the children to betray Wonka and give him one of these candies...

the opening stanza of the tune: A pleasant faced man steps up to greet you, He smiles and says he's pleased to meet you, Beneath his hat the strangeness lies Take it off, he's got three eyes Truth is false and logic lost Now the fourth dimension is crossed. In fact, and I don't mean to be so over-the-top mystically speaking, but the chorus of 'The Twilight Zone' is for the entire Willy Wonka's 2112 experience: You have entered the Twilight Zone Beyond this world strange things are known Use the key, unlock the door See what your fate might have in store Come explore your dream's creation Enter this world of imagination. 'Lessons' plays while Violet is taught one when she chews the magic 'dinner' gum and turns into a blueberry. The Oompah Loompahs then sing their own 'lesson's ong... 'Lessons' ends right as Charlie & Grandpa Joe start floating from drinking 'fizzy lifting' drinks. The song 'Tears' then begins and it is unbelievably beautiful to hear while the Charlie & Grandpa float to the ceiling.

Notice the lyrical and chorus-to-stanza changes in sync with the rise to the top, then: . As the scene changes from the fizzy lifting drink room, the next shot we see is a close-up of Willy's face with his eyes in a happy, upward stare... the final words of 'Tears' here are sang at this precise moment: Would it touch you deeper Than tears that fall from eyes That know why? . The final song on the CD, 'Something For Nothing', plays during Veruca's tirade over wanting a golden egg laying goose. Alex's guitar solo in the middle is awesome enough by itself, but when you hear it during Veruca's assault on the laboratory, it's unreal... then Geddy's voice kicks in exactly when she begins singing again! Both she and her father fall down the 'reject' chute...

then the song (and consequently, the CD) ends close to when the Oompa Loompahs finish their 'lesson's ong. All in all, ladies and gentlemen, you are in for a fantastic treat when you watch this sync. If you wish to read more about how I came up with the idea, click ' web '. Otherwise, happy viewing! !