The short story, "The Horse Dealer's Daughter," by D. H. Lawrence is about Mabel Perv in and her three brothers who are left with debts to pay after their father's death. Once the horses are sold Mabel's brothers decide where their lives would lead them and advice her to seek the home of her sister. Realizing their rejection and acknowledging an uncertain future, she visits the graves of her mother and father.

Feeling depressed and helpless, Mabel walks into a mucky pond not cognizant of Jack Fergusson's presence. Fighting his fear of water, Jack saves Mabel from an attempted suicide and has become a part of Mabel's plan to remain where she wants to be. She decides to take advantage of the situation by expressing her love and convincing Jack that he loves her as well. Mabel's love, in this story by D. H.

Lawrence, is her escape from having to leave her town and live with her sister in a less desirable fashion. She uses love as a means of obtaining the comfortable lifestyle that she once lived. She can once again have luxuries in life now that she will be marrying a doctor. Just as in the previous story, James Joyce's short story "Araby" also suggests love as an escape. In this short story, the young boy's existence surrounds a dreary and harsh environment. He lives with an uncle who drinks and an aunt who suffers from the heartache of an unhappy marriage.

The boy's friend Mangan has a sister who he is infatuated with to the extent of following her every move. He is so empowered by his feelings for her, he decides to go to Araby and buy Mangan's sister a gift. On the day of the bazaar, his uncle forgets to be home on time to give the boy money and therefore causes him to be late. Upon his arrival, the bazaar is almost completely closed when a woman asks half-heartedly, if he needed help. Replying no thank you, the boy becomes disenchanted with the idea of love being an escape from his horrible existence. He realizes that love will not always help his unhappiness.

The boy feels he is destined to be unhappy.