In William Golding's, The Lord of the Flies, an illegal killing took place. Unlawful homicides vary from First degree murder to Manslaughter. Second Degree, murder is a killing which is deliberate and planned in combination with felonies. When Piggy had gone to Castle Rock to retrieve his glasses, he ended fighting Jack. While the boys were disputing a rock was thrown at Piggy subsequently making him fall and die. Jack then proceeded to scream to Ralph that that's what he deserved, approving Piggy's murder.

The Jury should find Jack Merridew guilty of Second Degree Murder in the death of Piggy. Granted, Jack Merridew himself did not kill Piggy; however, he did plan to kill anyone who was in his way when stealing Piggy's glasses. "We " ll keep along the sands. Then if he comes, we " ll do our dance again" Jack had planned to kill Ralph, just like they killed Simon in their dance, if he meddled with his plans. Piggy just happened to be the one who interfered with Jack's plans. Jack's followers listened to what he said, and Roger rolled the rock at Piggy, killing him.

Jack never really cared for Piggy from the start. He wanted him out of his way so he could become chief; he was the only thing that kept Ralph in charge. Jack would have done anything for that position, and Piggy interfered, which resulted in his murder. Jack did plan to kill someone, and Piggy happened to be first.

In addition, Jack treated Piggy with extreme cruelty. Jack's brutal behavior toward Piggy exposed his evil side. This could be why he wanted to kill him, as they began arguing since they had first met. Jack also felt a desire for power; Piggy would never grant him this supremacy, which led to violence either physically or verbally. After Jack let the fire go out, Piggy reprimanded him leading to frustration in Jack; "This from Piggy, and the wails of agreement from some of the hunters, drove Jack to violence. The bolting look came into his blue eyes.

He took a step, and able at last to hit someone, stuck his fist into Piggy's stomach " Jack could have hit anyone else but struck Piggy, showing his deep hatred for him. All Jack needed was the opportunity to kill Piggy, and he would have taken it just like when he punched him in the stomach. Jack's wicked behavior led to malicious treatment toward Piggy. Furthermore, after the unlawful killing of Piggy Jack acted as if it never happened. He had no emotion towards his death. "See? See? That's what you " ll get! I mean that! There isn't a tribe for you any more! The conch is gone-" Those were his first words after Piggy was murdered showing that he had no sentimental value to him, and all he cares about is himself.

Jack wanted the chief position so badly that he would have done anything for it, anything. In fact, Jack stayed so calm that it actually seems like the murder was pre-planned. Therefore allowing Jack the time to undergo any emotions before the killing took place; which would explain why he was so insensitive. Jack was not bothered by Piggy's murder. Therefore, Jack Merridew should be found guilty of Second Degree Murder. Jack planned to kill any interference, which was Piggy.

He treated him with extreme cruelty, through punching him in the stomach. Finally, Jack supported Piggy's murder by telling Ralph that he got what he deserved. In The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, Jack is guilty in the murder of Piggy.