What is Foreign Policy? When constructing the US foreign policy, the President and Congress must consider multiple issues. For example, the national security, regional interest, geo-strategic importance of the area, strength of the economy, availability of resources, previous agreements, and ideology are the basis for the structure of the foreign policy. The reaction of the American people is also taken into consideration when developing the foreign policy. National, state, or regional interests, concerns of political parties or interest groups, public opinion, and the need for personal security and economic prosperity are all focused on greatly while forming the US policy. The foreign policy is implemented by using instruments, culture, diplomacy, military, and economy, in order to create harmony- rewarding a country for good behavior. The same instruments, culture, diplomacy, military, and economy, are used to deal with conflict- influence a country to change.

All of this was found in the assignment "Factors for Formulating Foreign Policy" and "Instruments of Foreign Policy." As we took notes, we learned the structure and mechanics of how the US foreign policy is developed and implemented. Following the 1970, there were many reactions, both good choices and bad choices, the US took in response to major crises. When the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan, the US was very opposed to this, and refused to send its Olympic athletes to Moscow for the 1980 summer Olympics. In 1982, the US wanted to put new and more accurate missiles in Western Europe, while some Europeans opposed it.

1. 1 What is Foreign Policy Analyze the significant issues of the United States foreign policy and the role of national interests, values, and principles. The significant issues of the United States foreign policy are anything that may affect our relations with a foreign country. The factors the US governments considers in terms of national interests are as follows: national security, regional interests, geostrategic importance of the area, strength of the economy, availability of resources, previous agreements, and ideology. The reaction of the American people is of great significance.

National, state, and regional interests, concerns of political parties and interest groups, public opinion, and the need for personal security and economic prosperity are all taken in consideration when forming the US foreign policy. Last, but not least, the background knowledge we have about countries that are directly or indirectly involved is of great significance. Their histories and cultures, geostrategic importance, security and economic needs as well as assets, alliances with other nations, and probable responses to the policy are the main background knowledge needed to successfully make the US foreign policy. The "Factors for Formulating Foreign Policy" worksheet helped to grasp the understanding of the significant issues of the US foreign policy, as well as the role of national interest, values, and principles. 3. 1 9/ 11/ 01 Analyze major United States foreign policy and responses to major crises since the early 1970's The Monroe Doctrine, Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, Marshall Plan, Truman Doctrine, and the Policy of Containment were all significant United States foreign policies.

The Monroe Doctrine basically stated to Europe that they were to stay out of the affairs of the Americas. The US didn't want them to get colonized and the US sent out an indirect threat stating they will stick up for any country. The Roosevelt Corollary wanted to maintain stability. It was similar to the Monroe Doctrine, whereas they wanted Latin America to be confident that the US would back them up. The US was adamant about Europe not being over there. The Marshall plan took action following WWII.

The Doctrine stated that what happened in Germany should never happen again, because if it does, the US will step in. If Europe agreed to this, the US would help restore and rebuild their country. The Truman Doctrine was stating the US would be the "global peacekeeper." That the US would make sure all governments have freedoms of choice. In addition, we would send aid to Greece and Turkey to fight communism.

Containment basically meant the US would NOT let the Soviet Union expand, they were to remain contained. What is Foreign Policy? Following the 1970, there were many reactions, both good choices and bad choices, the US took in response to major crises. When the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan, the US was very opposed to this, and refused to send its Olympic athletes to Moscow for the 1980 summer Olympics. In 1982, the US wanted to put new and more accurate missiles in Western Europe, while some Europeans opposed it. The US reacted with diplomatic reasoning, and persuaded Europe to allow it.

In 2002/ 2003, Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein wouldn't allow weapons inspectors search any of his presidential palaces. Therefore the US thought he might be hiding biological and chemical weapons from inspectors, so the US started a full-blown war. All this information was found in "The History Behind US Foreign Policy" and "United States Foreign Policy Scenarios" worksheets. Following the 1970, there were many reactions, both good choices and bad choices, the US took in response to major crises. When the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan, the US was very opposed to this, and refused to send its Olympic athletes to Moscow for the 1980 summer Olympics. In 1982, the US wanted to put new and more accurate missiles in Western Europe, while some Europeans opposed it 2.

2 & 2. 3 A Delicate Balance: Creating Policy in a Complex World Describe the interdependent relationship of the US with other countries and with international organizations The US is involved in all of the international organizations (International Red Cross, International Monetary Fund, United Nations, and The World Bank. ) The International Red Cross helps to alleviate human suffering wherever it may be found, to protect life and health, and ensure respect for all humans, while working to prevent disease. The Monetary Fund is used to safeguard financial and monetary stability and provide financial backing for reviving and expanding international trade. The United Nations is used to maintain international peace and security, to develop friendly relations among nations, to cooperate in solving international problems and for promoting respect for human rights. It is the center for harmonizing the actions of nations.

Finally, the World Bank is used to mobilize and allocate capital resources for reconstruction of war torn states and the expansion of world production and trade. This was all found in the worksheet entitled "International Organizations." What Is Foreign Policy? The Monroe Doctrine, Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, Marshall Plan, Truman Doctrine, and the Policy of Containment were all significant United States foreign policies. The Monroe Doctrine basically stated to Europe that they were to stay out of the affairs of the Americas. The US didn't want them to get colonized and the US sent out an indirect threat stating they will stick up for any country. The Roosevelt Corollary wanted to maintain stability. It was similar to the Monroe Doctrine, whereas they wanted Latin America to be confident that the US would back them up.

The US was adamant about Europe not being over there. The Marshall plan took action following WWII. The Doctrine stated that what happened in Germany should never happen again, because if it does, the US will step in. If Europe agreed to this, the US would help restore and rebuild their country. The Truman Doctrine was stating the US would be the "global peacekeeper." That the US would make sure all governments have freedoms of choice. In addition, we would send aid to Greece and Turkey to fight communism.

Containment basically meant the US would NOT let the Soviet Union expand, they were to remain contained.