Bruce Dawe was born in 1930, in Victoria. He grew up to be Australia's best selling and most popular poet. His successful poetry book 'Sometimes gladness's old over 100, 000 copies since its initial publication. Quite a lot of Dawe's poems express and analyze consumerism. Consumerism is present in the three poems 'Enter without so much as knocking', 'Televistas' and 'Breakthrough' In the poem 'Enter without so much as knocking' consumerism is a major issue throughout the text. The poem introduces a newly born child into the world.

The poem states .".. and he was really lucky because it didn't mean a thing to him then... ." (p 14) a child is so innocent, so unaware of the consumerism in the world around them. At first they are unaffected. Not noticing anything material, a child does not get involved in the obsession of owning and purchasing. As a child grows up they are introduced to consumerism, being brought up around it often makes consumerism seem normal to be all around you.

The more they observe the more they adapt. Finally when they have witnessed consumerism to an extent they themselves turn out to be .".. like every other godless money-hungry back-stabbing miserable so-and-so... ." (p 15) someone that when they die nobody misses them, nobody cares.

Bruce Dawe was born in 1930, in Victoria. He grew up to be Australia's best selling and most popular poet. His successful poetry book 'Sometimes gladness's old over 100, 000 copies since its initial publication. Quite a lot of Dawe's poems express and analyze consumerism. Consumerism is present in the three poems 'Enter without so much as knocking', 'Televistas' and 'Breakthrough' 'sometimes gladness " written by Bruce Dawe.