Abstract Work teams are firmly established in management theory and practice as dynamic engines of productivity and innovation. Around the globe, firms are mobilizing teams to create and seize market opportunities. Diversity on teams has been shown to be positively associated with performance if process challenges are addressed. Diverse teams have been shown to generate a greater variety of ideas, draw on greater store tacit knowledge, make better decisions, and more effectively accomplish complex tasks than individuals.

How can the global corporation - the emblem of business in the 21 st century - translate its mission statement into individual action? One answer is via a new breed of teams. These new teams comprise people from different time zones, geographical areas, and cultural affiliations - people whose values, motivations, expectations and behaviors differ. At their best, such teams are able to transcend time, distance, and cultural barriers - hence their name. They are the bridges between a company's vision of itself as a global entity, and the realization of that vision. Understanding differences; diverse teams are superior to monocultural ones in terms of business performance. They are more creative, innovative, flexible, and productive, but only if handled sensitively.

This means accepting and valuing individual and group differences, in a climate of mutual respect and equality. Individuals, however, do not always conform to group stereotypes. Indeed, people often have more than one group with which they identify. One of the tasks of a global business is to develop and maintain among members a strong sense of, and commitment to, the team and its goals. This is difficult enough among companies in the inner cities and suburban areas. When the factors of time, distance, and other cultures are introduced, each team member operates in two co-existing realities.

Project managers have very little direct power, so they have to use other influencing strategies to achieve their goals. These strategies include logic, bargaining, and building a common vision of the team. They also need to cover feedback, both positive and negative. Most companies become increasingly adept at style-switching, changing the ways they communicate to suit different types of people and situations. Personality differences are just as important as cultural ones. Companies believe that the vast majority of people in business want to do a good job.

In a world in which companies are increasingly global, understanding cultures differences has become a prerequisite for sustainable development. Cultural differences should never be used as an excuse for poor organizational management, however. Decision-maker must differentiate between from and content. Being sensitive to different styles and preferences will never do away with the need for good management and leadership. REFERENCE Nayman, M.

(2003). Synergy from Diversity. Retrieved October 4, 2003 Website: web > Abstract Work teams are firmly established in management theory and practice as dynamic engines of productivity and innovation. Around the globe, firms are mobilizing teams to create and seize market opportunities. Diversity on teams has been shown to be positively associated with performance if process challenges are addressed. Diverse teams have been shown to generate a greater variety of ideas, draw on greater store tacit knowledge, make better decisions, and more effectively accomplish complex tasks than individuals.

How can the global corporation - the emblem of business in the 21 st century - translate its mission statement into individual action? One answer is via a new breed of teams. These new teams comprise people from different time zones, geographical areas, and cultural affiliations - people whose values, motivations, expectations and behaviors differ. At their best, such teams are able to transcend time, distance, and cultural barriers - hence their name. They are the bridges between a company's vision of itself as a global entity, and the realization of that vision. Understanding differences; diverse teams are superior to monocultural ones in terms of business performance.

They are more creative, innovative, flexible, and productive, but only if handled sensitively. This means accepting and valuing individual and group differences, in a climate of mutual respect and equality. Individuals, however, do not always conform to group stereotypes. Indeed, people often have more than one group with which they identify. One of the tasks of a global business is to develop and maintain among members a strong sense of, and commitment to, the team and its goals.

This is difficult enough among companies in the inner cities and suburban areas. When the factors of time, distance, and other cultures are introduced, each team member operates in two co-existing realities. Project managers have very little direct power, so they have to use other influencing strategies to achieve their goals. These strategies include logic, bargaining, and building a common vision of the team. They also need to cover feedback, both positive and negative.

Most companies become increasingly adept at style-switching, changing the ways they communicate to suit different types of people and situations. Personality differences are just as important as cultural ones. Companies believe that the vast majority of people in business want to do a good job. In a world in which companies are increasingly global, understanding cultures differences has become a prerequisite for sustainable development.

Cultural differences should never be used as an excuse for poor organizational management, however. Decision-maker must differentiate between from and content. Being sensitive to different styles and preferences will never do away with the need for good management and leadership. REFERENCE Nayman, M. (2003). Synergy from Diversity.

Retrieved October 4, 2003 Website: web.