• Kant's Formalism Theory Categorical Imperative
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    Kant's Formalism Theory The theories of Immanuel Kant, a German philosopher, have had an impact on the formulation and shaping of ethics today. Immanuel Kant graced this earth from 1724 to 1804. During his eighty year life time, he formulated many interesting ideas regarding ethical conduct and motivation. Kant is strictly a non-consequential ist philosopher, which means that he believes that a person's choices should have nothing to do with the desired outcome, but instead mankind simply goes a...
  • Hume Vs Kant Causality
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    Hume vs. Kant: Causality Hume's ultimate goal in his philosophic endeavors was to undermine abstruse Philosophy. By focusing on the aspect of reason, Hume shows there are limitations to philosophy. Since he did not know the limits, he proposed to use reason to the best of his ability, but when he came to a boundary, that was the limit. He conjectured that we must study reason to find out what is beyond the capability of reason. Hume began his first examination if the mind by classifying its con...
  • Kant Highest Good
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    Essay One: Immanuel Kant was a from Germany in the eighteenth century. He believed that the only test of whether a decision is right or wrong is whether it could be applied to everyone. Would it be all right for everyone to do what you are doing? If not, your decision is wrong. It would be wrong, for example, to make a promise with the intention of breaking it because if everyone did that, no one would believe anyone's promises. In ethics, Kant tried to show that doing one's duty consisted in fo...
  • Immanuel Kant Vs Joshua Wegner
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    Joshua Wegner Philosophy 101 12/07/00 Trentacoste Immanuel Kant vs. Joshua Wegner THE RIGHT TO PUNISH: RETRIBUTIVISM As a society we all accept the fact that if you do something wrong you must be held responsible for your actions and pay the consequences. We all accept the concept of punishment, even though we are aware that we, ourselves, could one day be subjected to answer for our actions. While we may all be in favor of punishment in general, it is often debated upon how or why we punish a c...
  • Categorical Imperative Kant Morals Moral
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    Kant states (38, ) "act as if the maxim of thy action were to become by thy will a universal law of nature." This "categorical imperative" forms the basis of his book, Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals. Though at times his writing is confusing Kant lays out his logic as to what a categorical imperative is. Kant divides the book into three sections. The first explains the transition from everyday moral beliefs to the philosophy of those morals. The transition from popular moral...
  • Causes And Effects Kant World Reason
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    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) spent all of his life in Knigsberg, a small German town on the Baltic Sea in East Prussia. (After World War II, Germany's border was pushed west, so Knigsberg is now called Kaliningrad and is part of Russia. ) At the age of fifty-five, Kant appeared to be a washout. He had taught at Knigsberg University for over twenty years, yet had not published any works of significance. During the last twenty-five years of his life, however, Kant left a mark on the history of philos...
  • Kant Perpetual Peace
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    Can't find it here? Try Collegiate Care Immanuel Kant By: Yon na Yelverton Immanuel Kant was a man before his time. His philosophies, as outlined in Perpetual Peace, paved the way for modern political relations. Unbeknownst to his day and age, his insights were a revelation. They were seeds planted and left unseen for 120 years. As a first and second image theorist, Kant mixes his liberal and realist views to paint a picture of 'perpetual peace.' His essay outlines the actions that nations shoul...
  • Kant Categorical Imperative
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    Immanuel Kant, a supporter of capital punishment, offered us of the most complicated, if not ambiguous, views on the subject. In fact, he would " ve ironically disagreed with its modern proponents. Those who advocate capital punishment today often do so for utilitarian reasons. For example, the death sentence would protect society by not only preventing a from committing the same crime again, it would also deter others by setting an example. Kant would " ve argued the rights of the condemned are...
  • Kantian Cosmopolitan Politics Universal History
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    Question: In his essay "Idea for a Universal History with Cosmopolitan Purpose" Kant argues that the greatest problem for the human species is "that of attaining a civil society which can administer justice universally." Discuss how Kant argues for this claim and what his proposal is for achieving it historically You may supplement your answer by briefly outlining one contemporary version of Kant's proposal... Do you think Kant's proposal has at all been approximated in modernity? (Word count 18...
  • Emmanuel Kant's Ethics Acting According To Duty
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    As we discussed in class on Monday night, Kant's main argument in the first section was dedicated to developing his belief that a rational beings have the capacity to reason and through this reason comes a beings ability to know what is right or wrong. Also, Kant revealed that a beings also have an inherent desire to keep themselves save physically and strive for happiness. Yet, these desires or needs can be fulfilled with pure instinct and that reason does not need to be used in order to reach ...
  • Kant And Hobbs Reasoning Experience Bill
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    Historical Background to Kant In order to understand Kant's position, we must understand the philosophical background that he was reacting to. First, I will present a brief overview of his predecessor's positions with a brief statement of Kant's objections, then I will return to a more detailed exposition of Kant's arguments. There are two major historical movements in the early modern period of philosophy that had a significant impact on Kant: Empiricism and Rationalism. Kant argues that both t...
  • Kant Metaphysical Exposition Of Space
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    Kant: Explain and asses what you think to be the best argument Kant gives as his "Metaphysical Exposition of Space" (B 37-40) that space cannot be either and actual entity (Newtonian concept) or any independent relation among real things (Leibnizian concept be on). In other words, is he successful in arguing that space must be (at least) a form of intuition? Do any of his arguments further show that space must be ONLY a form of intuition and not ALSO something Newtonian or Leibnizian? In his Met...
  • Kant And Morality Universal Law
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    Kant and Morality Kant had a different ethical system which was based on reason. According to Kant reason was the fundamental authority in determining morality. All humans possess the ability to reason, and out of this ability comes two basic commands: the hypothetical imperative and the categorical imperative. In focusing on the categorical imperative, in this essay I will reveal the underlying relationship between reason and duty. The categorical imperative suggests that a course of action mu...
  • Kant's Categorical Imperative Applied
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    Kant describes the categorical imperative as "expressed by an ought and thereby indicate the relation of an objective law of reason to a will that is not necessarily determined by this law because of its subjective constitution." In other words, a categorical imperative is a command of morality that applies everywhere at all times no matter what, without exception. Kant describes two forms of imperatives, hypothetical and categorical. Kant defines the hypothetical imperative as "an action is goo...
  • Morality Send Me This Paper
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    Philosophy Papers Same Day Delivery! Only $9. 95/page + FREE Bibliography! ! ! Papers On More Philosophers & Philosophies Page 3 of 36 Previous Next Immanuel Kant's 'Critique Of Pure Reason'[ send me this paper ]A 5 page paper that provides an analysis of Kant's work and focuses on the ideal of pure reason as a central development. No additional sources cited. Filename: Kantreas. wpsImmanuel Kant's Concept of Good Will Analyzed[ send me this paper ]A 5 page paper which examines German philosophe...
  • Categorical Imperative Kant Moral One
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    The Categorical Imperative Of Immanuel Kant's Philosophy What would you do if you saw a little old lady with a cane walking slowly across a busy street without remembering to look both ways? Most people would answer that they would run out into the street to save her. However, why would these people do this? The rescuer may have not had any relation whatsoever to the little old lady, yet they still decide to risk their life for her. Was it because of basic, natural instinct? Did the rescuer just...
  • Analytical Statement Kant Hume Priori
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    The Central Pragmatics of Kant's Synthetic Device: Why Hume Didn't have a chance Scottish Skeptic David Hume inspired Immanuel Kant, of the East Prussian town of Konigsberg, to awaken from his dogmatic slumbers, thought to be the sleep of the most adequate reason. David Hume wrote his first book, A Treatise of Human Nature, in native Britain proposing that all knowledge is based on individual experience or habit and that our morality is subject only to our emotions. This shook Kant's "manifold" ...
  • Kant Principle Priori Possibility
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    Most of the difficulty I have with the Prolegomena so far is simply due to the wording of sentences, and I'm not sure if that's because of differences between translations or if this is representative of a deeper problem I'm having with the subtlety of Kant's philosophy in general. For example, in Kant's introduction (sorry, I can't find the page) he asks, "How are synthetic propositions a priori possible?" I wonder if this is the same as the question, "How are synthetic a priori propositions po...
  • Critique Of Kant's Perpetual Peace
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    When looking at Kant's notable work, Perpetual Peace, there are many discrepancies as to whether he displays a realist or liberalist doctrine throughout his methodical explanation as to the ways of attaining perpetual peace. In order to properly determine which viewpoint Kant basis the majority of his theories upon, it is imperative that we summarize his argument, identifying both the realist and liberalist aspects of his work, and, from this, determine whether or not his analysis is concurrent ...
  • Biography Of Immanuel Kant
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    A Biography for Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Immanuel Kant was born in Konigsberg, Russia on April 22 nd 1724. From a young age he attended a school devoted to the tenets of Pietism (a 17 th century evangelical movement) devoted on bible study and personal religious experience. His Mother had no education and devoted her life to God and her family, his father supported her on the little wages he earned from making saddles. In 1740, at the age of sixteen, he enrolled in the University of Koningsberg...