• Thomas Jefferson English Honours 12
    869 words
    Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) Thomas Jefferson was the author of the Declaration of Independence, a principle leader in the American Revolution, and the third president of the United States of America. Jefferson was also regarded as a great thinker and diplomat, and was a renowned contributor to the foundation of the country. Jefferson was well educated, an active committeeman, a skillful draftsman and had a wide range of knowledge of English history and political philosophy. His wisdom in variou...
  • Liberalism In Early American Literature
    1,114 words
    Liberalism is the foundation of America. This ideology is found in the country's early fledgling literature and in the very document that made America free. Both the selected works of Phyllis Wheatley and Thomas Jefferson are actively working for the ideology of liberalism, which is a political ideology that is against any system that threatens the freedom of the individual and his natural rights and prevents the individual from becoming all the individual can be, specifically the importance of ...
  • Scientific Revolution Nature Human Galileo
    1,974 words
    The Scientific Revolution and the Age of Enlightenment The Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century, which was initiated by the Renaissance, greatly advanced the movement toward modernity. No longer was there a medieval view of the universe, but instead scientific method of understanding. It was then thought that "rigorous and systematic observation and experimentation were the essential means of unlocking nature's secrets" (Western Civilization, 276). Western thinkers increasingly felt ...
  • Rousseau Social Contract Natural Rights Man
    1,550 words
    The social pact comes down to this; "Each one of us puts into the community his person and all his powers under the supreme direction of the general will; and as a body, we incorporate every member as an indivisible part of the whole (Rousseau: 61) ." The general will can itself direct the forces of the state with the intention of the whole's primary goal - which is the common good. The general will does not allow private opinions to prevail. The union of the people, in its passive role is known...
  • The Philosophies Of Georg Hegel And Herbert Spencer
    1,276 words
    The Philosophies of Georg Hegel and Herbert Spencer The Philosophy of Georg Wilhelm Hegel (1770-1801) Metaphysics Georg Wilhelm Hegel aspired to find a philosophy that would embody all human experiences with the integration of not only science, but also religion, history, art, politics and beyond. Hegel's metaphysical theory of absolute idealism claimed that reality was the absolute truth of all logic, spirit, and rational ideas encompassing all human experience and knowledge. He believed that i...
  • Declaration Of Independence Today
    2,090 words
    A Latin statement commonly used in the Middle Ages to define the purpose of government reads: proper jura, non po testas prater jura. This succinct statement translates to mean, "service to and for the sake of rights, not a power exercised beyond or outside of rights." This age-old definition of what gains a government should work toward, coupled with a belief in the importance of universal rights, provided in essence the backbone of the American Declaration of Independence. However, Thomas Jeff...
  • The Partys Denial Of A Persons Natural Rights
    1,002 words
    The novel 1984 touches on many disturbing aspects about the denial of a person's natural rights. In today's society people are granted certain rights which the government or anyone else can not take away. These rights are the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. In the novel 1984 the government which the people of Oceania live under has taken away all of the rights of people, including natural rights. The right to life has been taken away in the sense that a persons life is the ...
  • Hobbes And Locke On Natural Rights
    1,344 words
    According to the natural right theory, the state of nature is the original condition of human beings in regard to any common authority. In the state of nature, according to Thomas Hobbes, each individual has a right to everything, even the body / life of the other. The state of nature can lead to the state of moral chaos. Moral chaos produces physical chaos or war, thus the state of war, the war of all against all. The reason this is because no one has any connection to the other, everyone has t...
  • Thomas Paine And Common Sense
    1,082 words
    In early 1776 the sentiment surrounding the idea of revolution was evenly divided in Britain's colonies in America. The feelings were split evenly between those for a revolt, those opposing it and those who were neutral. In January 1776 Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense. The ideas and theories expressed in the pamphlet were very compelling and thorough. Compelling enough to sway much of the undecided colonists to agree that revolt is the necessary course of action. Paine states in the introduction...
  • Brook Farm Nature Emerson Transcendental
    2,235 words
    Transcendentalism For the transcendentalist, the "I" transcends the corporeal and yet nature is the embodiment of the transcendence and, or, the means to achieving transcendence, which gives way to a belief that the physical "I" is at the root of all transcendence. In practical terms, the transcendentalist is occupied with the natural over the synthetic (though it is doubtful that either Kant or Emerson would have couched it in those terms) and determines value as it relates to the individual. A...
  • Enlightenment 2 French Revolution
    1,686 words
    Why is the Enlightenment a Significant Event It was an intellectual movement in thinking, which moved society's thinking away from religious thinking, dominated by the Church, to rational thought dominated by science The Enlightenment (or 'Age of Reason') is a term used to describe the philosophical, scientific, and rational attitudes, the freedom from superstition, and the belief in religious tolerance of much of 18 th-century Europe. People believe the start of the Enlightenment period was bet...
  • Is Feminism Harmful Natural Law
    1,930 words
    PART B- IS FEMINISM A HARMFUL IDEOLOGY Describe two central moral issues. In Issue 4, "Is Feminism a Harmful Ideology" I believe that the two central moral issues to this debate are as follows: (1) Is it immoral to infringe upon individual liberty (even if some other good can come of it) (2) Is it immoral to discriminate based on sex (even if there are innate differences, which are relevant to the situation) What makes these distinctly moral issues, as opposed to legal, religious, or socio-polit...
  • French Revolution Third Estate
    1,109 words
    Sources Essay #1 Abbe de Sieyes, Olympe de Gouges, and Edmund Burke were all concerned about the future of France. Each of the authors, though, had three different, and distinct perspectives regarding the Revolution. Abbe de Sieyes conveyed the vitality of the third estate; Olympe de Gouges took a stand for the parity of women; and Edmund Burke advocated the incorporation of conservatism instead of a revolution. Sieyes and Gouges were for the revolution, while Burke was against it. Sieyes repres...
  • The Puritan Revolt And The Glorious Revolution
    1,443 words
    In the 17 th century, England was marked by two revolutions known as the English Revolution or the Puritan Revolt and the Glorious Revolution. The Puritan Revolt was a conflict between the English monarch and the Parliamentarians, which resulted in the establishment of a republican commonwealth (! ^0 English Civil War! In 1688, the Glorious Revolution broke out, an event that culminated in the removal of King James II and the establishment of Parliament power over the monarch (! ^0 The Glorious ...
  • Natural Rights Liberalism Liberal Freedom
    2,184 words
    In order to examine the core elements of liberalism and discuss the conservative criticisms of liberalism I must address the key topics of the essay. I need to know what exactly being a liberal or conservative is all about and therefore must examine their political ideologies and history. I will also address their main goals, beliefs, values and key thinkers and the differences between the two. Firstly, I must establish what exactly is a political ideology. John Rawls and Robert Nozik were the f...