• John Q Adams Secretary President House
    536 words
    John Quinsy Adams was born in Braintree Massachusetts. His other, Abigail Smith Adams and his father, John Adams (2 nd president of the United States of America) trained John Quinsy very well. At ten years old John Q. traveled with his father on diplomat missions to Europe. He learned French fluently there in a private school at Paris. After Studying French in Paris Adams studied at the University of Leiden. In 1782 through 1783 he was a secretary and interpreter of the French in Germany. After...
  • Zachary Taylor White House
    838 words
    Zachary Taylor was the twelfth President of the United States. He was a very interesting person. He was a crook, a gambler, a drunkard, and had a very short temper. One source claimed that seeing Zachary Taylor sober was something few people could claim to have done. A short time after Taylor was born in 1784, he was given the peculiar nickname muskrat head. The exact story behind this nickname has since been lost. Taylor was very sensitive when it came to his nickname. The sighting of this rep...
  • Grover Cleveland President Family First
    555 words
    Grover Cleveland Grover Cleveland, the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was born in Caldwell, New Jersey on March 18, 1837. He was the first Democratic President who served two terms that did not directly follow each other. He also was the first President who was elected after the Civil War. Grover Cleveland was born the son of a country minister whose name was Richard Fallen Cleveland. His mothers name was Ann Neal Cleveland, the daughter of a publisher. Grover Cl...
  • Bush Gore Vice President
    1,574 words
    . ASHINGTON -- The storm over his campaign finance practices has thrust Al Gore into what his advisers concede is by far the most perilous moment of his political career, leaving his aides scrambling to contain the damage. The growing nervousness results from the announcement last week that Janet Reno, the attorney general, is reviewing whether the vice president's fund-raising activities may have been improper for such a high-ranking official. The inquiry could lead to the appointment of a spec...
  • Whitewater Vs Watergate National Security
    2,068 words
    Whitewater vs. Watergate. Both are political sandals that have rocked the nation. As Watergate unraveled, many of Nixon's dirty tactics were learned, including assorted lists of enemies (a number of which became targets of IRS tax audits), wiretapping, political sabotage, burglary, blackballing, and smear campaigns. Similarly, as Whitewater unfolded, the scandal appeared to involve more than just an illegal loan. It touched on possible hush money paid to witnesses and includes the acquisition of...
  • President Cleveland Grover Term House
    1,032 words
    Grover Cleveland Stephan Grover Cleveland is the fifth of nine children born to Reverend Richard Fallen Cleveland and Ann Neal Cleveland. He was born on March 18 th of 1837 in Caldwell, New Jersey, although he was raised in Fayetteville, New York. The actual house in which he was born still stands today on 207 Bloomfield Avenue. He was named in honor of Stephan Grover, a minister at a local Presbyterian Church who Reverend Cleveland had recently taken over for. Life as the son of a minister was ...
  • Who Is Monica Lewinsky
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    Is Monica simply a hapless White House intern caught in the middle of a media created scandal started by Linda Tripp. Monica Lewinsky is a 24 year old graduate of Lewis and Clark University in Oregon. Daughter of a Democratic contributor she was easily able to get an intern position in the White Horse. Some of Lewinsky's friends have said that she only took the intern position to sleep with important people. If the recent news reports are true Monica Lewinsky got what she was looking for. Linda ...
  • Watergate Scandal White House
    785 words
    The Watergate scandal had everything. Nixon disgraced the presidency by lying to the country and abusing his power and his committees were involved in illegal acts and a big cover up, all leading to little side roads of corruption and lies. Watergate is by far one of the worst presidential scandals in the history of the United States. In the story of Watergate, five burglars were found breaking into democratic offices at the Watergate complex in Washington DC. The break-in was passed off as just...
  • The United States Of America Vs Richard M Nixon
    720 words
    The United States of America vs. Richard M. Nixon Issue In this case, the court is asked to decide if the president in the Watergate robberies and if he had the right to invoke Executive Privilege. Facts During the campaign of President Nixon's second term, a group of burglars working for the committee to re-elect the President broke into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate office-apartment complex in Washington DC, apparently in search of political intelligenc...
  • World Order Circle Power Washington
    2,165 words
    Occultists the world over believe that, once a symbol is created, it acquires power of its own, and more power is generated when such symbol (s) are created without the profane [uninitiated] knowing about it. And, the greatest power of all is created in the symbol (s) if the uninitiated NEVER discover that the symbol exists. In this article, we shall demonstrate positive proofs of conspiracy to achieve the ends of Freemasonry, i. e. , achieving the New World Order. And, these proofs exist right ...
  • Americans Who At One Point Fdr Roosevelt Franklin
    583 words
    During its years of existence, The United States of America had seen 42 presidents governing its citizens and created policies, amendment and laws which they have lived by. But in 1933, a man with views and a character different than his predecessors won the trust of millions of Americans who at one point had no hopes, and a future seemed unclear. His name was Franklin D. Roosevelt, a man whose willingness to build the economy of his country as the most powerful nation, brought admiration not on...
  • The Watergate Affair White House
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    The Watergate Affair This analysis of the news media coverage will focus on the Watergate affair which originally began on June 17, 1972 with the break-in of the Democratic National Committee Headquarters at the prestigious Watergate office complex in Washington D. C... I will primarily concentrate on the negative impact that media coverage had to the publics eye. This media coverage, although justified and appropriate for the situation, ultimately destroyed the credibility of Nixon's administra...
  • Woodward White House
    705 words
    All the president's men By: Nancy Richard Nixon's first term as president was always be connected with the Watergate scandal and the President investigations. This scandal has been etched in the minds of millions and is still being recalled today when faced with the present day scandal of our current President. In the book, All the President's Men, written by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, they recount, illustrate, and analyze this period of time and their work on reporting and revealing these...
  • Meetings Cheney Enron Energy Company
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    SENATE MAJORITY LEADER Tom Daschle called Cheney's stance "unfortunate." The American people have a right to know what the facts are," Daschle said on CBS's "Face the Nation." I think the administration needs to open up, to be willing to be forthcoming with all the information regarding these circumstances." At issue are meetings Cheney or members of his energy task force held with officials of energy firms, including the now-collapsed Enron Corp. , while the energy policy was being formed last ...
  • The Election White House
    1,347 words
    Five weeks after Election Day, George W. Bush at last laid claim to the presidency Wednesday night with a pledge to "seize this moment" and deliver reconciliation and unity to a nation divided. Al Gore exited the tortuously close race, exhorting the nation to put aside partisan rancor and support its new chief executive. "I was not elected to serve one party, but to serve one nation," the nation's soon-to-be 43 rd president told Americans in remarks prepared for a nationally televised address fr...
  • Watergate Thesis Exploring The Roles Of Dean Li
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    Watergate The illegal actions sanctioned by G. Gordon Liddy and John Dean led to the prosecution of the Nixon administration s link to the Watergate break-in by special prosecutors Archibald Cox and Leon Jaworski. The Watergate saga is a compelling story of a failed government that in two years went from: the implausible to the unthinkable-the first resignation in history of a U. S. president. Despite some alarms, institutions held steady, law was upheld, and a chastened republic survived. It w...
  • Watergate White House
    659 words
    WATERGATE Watergate is the popular name for the political scandal and constitutional crisis that began with the arrest (June 17, 1972) of five burglars who broke into DEMOCRATIC National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office building in Washington, D. C. It ended with the resignation (Aug. 9, 1974) of President Richard M. NIXON. The burglars and two co-plotters-G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt-were indicted (September 1972) on charges of burglary, conspiracy, and wiretapping. Four mo...
  • The Watergate Scandal White House
    795 words
    On June 17, 1972, five intruders were arrested at Washington's Watergate hotel and apartment complex inside the office of the Democratic National Committee. The indictment of the burglars and the subsequent investigation of the break-in unraveled a web of political spying and sabotage, bribery, and the illegal use of campaign funds. The disclosure of these activities, and the administration's cover-up, resulted in the indictments of some 40 government officials and the resignation of the preside...
  • Architecture Of Nineteenth Century Washington D C
    726 words
    The architect Leopold Eidlitz once said "American architecture is the art of covering one thing with another thing to imitate a third thing, which if genuine would not be desirable" (guide pg. 42). The architects who designed Washington D. C. were true to this. Neoclassical, Greek Revival, Roman Revival, Georgian, Gothic Revival, and Egyptian architectural styles were all used in the creation of the city in the 1800's. The image of Classical order came to be strongly associated with public buil...
  • The Watergate Affair White House
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    The Watergate affair was the most significant scandal in United States governmental history. Watergate is defined as a scandal involving abuse of power by public officials, violation of the public trust, and attempted obstruction of justice. The Watergate scandal is named after the building complex in Washington D. C. , which was the site of the illegal activities that took place in 1972. In this essay I will explain what Watergate was, a few of the key players (many too numerous to mention), an...