• Pirates Of Penzance Critique
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    Pirates of Penzance - Critique The Pirates of Penzance was an opera performed by the Southwest Texas Opera Workshop. The Pirates of Penzance, composed by Gilbert & Sullivan, is a light-hearted parody of the traditional opera. This opera takes place somewhere in the British Virgin Islands. It is about a boy, Frederic, who is to be apprenticed by his nurse, Ruth, to become a pilot. Ruth mistakes the word pilot for pirate and apprentices him to a band of pirates. She, too, remains with them as a m...
  • Ulysses S Grant Maj Gen
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    ULYSSES S. GRANT " Grant: a biography' by William S. McFeely. Published by: Norton, Ww Copyright 1981 Ulysses Simpson Grant, (1822-1885), American general and 18 th President of the United States. Grant, the most capable of the Union generals during the Civil War, was a master strategist. He won the first major Union victories. President Abraham Lincoln staunchly defended him against critics and promoted him to command all Union forces. Grant accepted Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomatto...
  • Andrew Jackson President Died Carolina
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    Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson was born in the Wax haws near the border of North and South Carolina, on March 15, 1767. When Andrew Jackson was born, no one probably guessed that he would be the seventh president of the United States of America. He wasn't a "high class" person or had all the same credentials, but he became a war hero thus lifting him to his presidency. Andy Jackson was born the third child of Scotch-Irish parents. Jackson's father, also named Andrew, died as a result of a logging...
  • Major General James Wolfe
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    The history books should be re-written as to include Major-General James Wolfe as one of the founding fathers of our country. During the Seven years War he served as part of the British military and was the commander-in-chief of the British, American, and Highlander forces at the Battle of Quebec. His plan of attack up the Anse du Foulon to the Plains of Abraham was not only incredibly daring, but highly effective as it was this decisive move that allowed Wolfe's army to capture the city of Queb...
  • Atomic Bomb Manhattan Project
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    This was the basis for the atomic bomb. Throughout this research paper, I will trace the history of the atomic bomb. In addition, who was involved and why, what happened in this event, and explain the impact that it had on the world. After Einstein predicted, that mass could be converted into energy. This was confirmed experimentally by John D. Cockcroft and Ernest Walton. Physicists from 1939 onward conducted much research to find answers to questions as how many neutrons were emitted in each ...
  • The War At Gettysburg
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    The War at Gettysburg By Nick Jones Getting ThereOn the way to Gettysburg was tough. It was a long hard and tough journey getting there because there was no other way to get there for the army besides walking. It was so hard that some people died, and some got sick. The trip there was very long. Only about half all the people going there survived. The most of all people that died were Confederate men. The Population There was a lot of people involved in The War at Gettysburg. Major Joseph Hooke...
  • Andrew Jackson First President Rachel
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    There are many things that set Andrew Jackson apart from other presidents. His policies and personality set him apart from most. Although he was the seventh president, he was the first in many ways. Jackson was the first president to be born in a log cabin, and he was the first president to ride on a railroad train. Along with that, he was the only president to serve in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. Andrew Jackson was also the first to have a vice-president (John C. Calhoun) r...
  • Thomas Stonewall Jackson George Mcclellan
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    Thomas Stonewall Jackson was born in Clarksburg, Virginia, on January 21, 1824. After graduating 17 th in his class at the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He served in the Mexican War and won two brevets. While he was in Mexico, Jackson became a Presbyterian. A friend said that, 'He never smoked, he was a strict teetotaler and never touched a card.' In 1851, Jackson was recruited to teach at the Virginia Military Institute. His students called h...
  • Outline From May 31 June 12 1864
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    May 31 - June 12, 1864 In the overland campaign of 1864, Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant with the Army of the Potomac battled General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia for six weeks across central Virginia. At the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna and Totopotomoy Creek, Lee repeatedly stalled, but failed to stop, Grant's southward progress toward Richmond. The next logical military objective for Grant was the crossroads styled by locals Old Cold Harbor. May 31, 1864 After sp...
  • Offensive At St Mihiel
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    OFFENSIVE AT ST. MIHIEL The St. Mihiel Offensive began on September 12, 1918. It was the first operation of World War I performed and commanded solely by an American Army. The whole idea of the operation was to reduce the size of the German salient, a part of their battle line that jutted out towards allied territories. Though delayed at first by other occurring battles, the operation began on August 10, 1918 when the American First Army headquarters was set up. August 30, 1918, the First Army,...
  • The Epic Battle Of Shiloh
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    The Epic Battle of Shiloh By: Brian SemichMr. Gavin HIST 2030 05 Abstract (Summary of Report) The First Day April 6, 1862 With the loss of Forts Henry and Donelson in February, General Johnston withdrew his Confederate forces into west Tennessee, northern Mississippi and Alabama to reorganize. In early March, General Halleck responded by ordering General Grant to move his Union Army of West Tennessee on an invasion up the Tennessee River. Occupying Pittsburg Landing, Grant had no thought of a Co...
  • Civil War Battles Major General
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    The Major Battles of the Civil War No other war seems to hold our focus like the Civil War. Scholars have chosen to make it their life's work, authors have written reams about it, and we all feel some kind of connection to the Civil War. This paper was created to highlight some of the major battles that took place during that conflict. Major battles usually marked a drastic change in the momentum from one side to the other or led to massive losses of troops. These battles and their results all p...
  • Andrew Jackson Tennessee People Issues
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    Andrew Jackson, the seventh president of the United States, was born the Wax haw territory, lying between North and South Carolina on March 15, 1767. Jackson was the third child of Scotch-Irish parents. His father died as the result of a logging accident just a few weeks before Andrew was born. Jackson's mother, Elizabeth Hutchison Jackson, was regarded as a very independent woman. After her husband's death, she raised her three sons at the home of one of her relatives. 1 The Declaration of Inde...
  • Union Troops Fredericksburg Burnside General
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    On November 7 th of 1862, President Lincoln had had enough of General McClellan's incompetence. He relived him of his command and turned it over to General Ambrose Burnside. Burnside planned to take Richmond, the confederate capitol, by Fredericksburg. After getting his plan approved, his army of 115, 000 went to Fredericksburg and arrived on November 11 th. The Confederate camp in Fredericksburg had only a few thousand defenders. But Burnside could not attack because the pontoon bridge equipmen...
  • Benedict Arnold British Quebec Andr
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    'The Dark Eagle'; refers to the hero of Saratoga, Benedict Arnold, who went from highly regarded hero, to the most hated man in the Colonies in a matter of days. In the book: Benedict Arnold: The Dark Eagle, Brian Richard Boylan, analyzes the historical figure not critically, but objectively. He examines the forces that possibly could have driven Benedict Arnold to turn his back on the country that he fought for so dearly. Boylan also points out that the man who Arnold did most of his negotiatio...
  • Major General Corps Federal Lee
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    On the warm morning of July 1 st, 1863, a small Union cavalry brigade encountered two brigades of advancing confederate troops. With breech loading carbines, the Union troops were capable of getting off eight shots per minute to the Confederate's three. Despite smaller numbers, the Union's technology held the Confederates at bay. Quickly both sides called for reinforcements, and the Battle picked up. The first day was fought fiercely at high cost to those present, but was nothing compared to wha...
  • Battle Of The Wilderness
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    The Battle of the Wilderness Imagine, wrote a North Carolina officer named W. A. Smith, a great, dismal forest containing... the worst kind of thicket of second-growth trees... so thick with small pines and scrub oak, cedar, dogwood and other growth common to the country... [that] one could see barely ten paces (qtd. in Kennedy 203). This description is of the area known as the Wilderness, where over 135 years ago, one of the greatest Civil War battles occurred. The Battle of the Wilderness was...
  • The Civil War Union Army Battle
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    The Civil War was the most convulsive and significant war in American history. After the Constitution was adopted by all of the States in 1789, uniting the States into one nation, differences between the States had been worked out through compromises. By 1861 these differences between the Northern States, which included the Western States, and the Southern States had become so great that compromise would no longer work. Therefore, a conflict started within our nation that was called the Civil Wa...
  • Battle Of Gettysburg Major General
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    Gettysburg was the Army of the Potomac's only great victory on the battlefield. Antietam, certainly a strategic victory, showed Robert E. Lee's unstoppable killing machine was indeed stoppable. And the Army of the Potomac did eventually force Lee's Army of Northern Virginia from its impregnable Petersburg trenches. But Lee's surrender at Appomattox Courthouse finally came when the Rebel army was so weakened that surrender was almost a foregone conclusion. Such Union victories as the ones at Say...