• The Ghost Dance White Man
    1,819 words
    The Ghost Dance The Ghost Dance was a very important custom performed by many Indians during the 1880's through the 1890's. During the 1890's, the Indian civilization started to die. The Ghost Dance was a dance that tried to bring back the dead and bring back the ways of the Indians. During those times the Indians were having a hard time dealing with all of the white men. The white men were trying to push the Indians out of their land. In these times, the white man had basic control over the res...
  • Black Robe Indians Call Owl
    370 words
    'I Heard The Owl Call My Name' and 'The Black Robe': The Indians Although the Indians in I Heard The Owl Call My Name, and in The Black Robe are primitive in the technological sense, they are neither simple or emotional people. The Indians in both texts could be classed as primitive people - if we take primitive to mean technologically underdeveloped. The level of technology possessed by the white man is far superior to that of the Indians, yet the Indians in The Black Robe are happy to accept a...
  • Native Americans White Man Red
    659 words
    The Native American Through time the concerns of a certain group can stay consistent. The legacy of common attitudes and goals of Native Americans of the last century have transcended to their present day descendents. The concerns of the last century Native Americans were that white men were infringing and stealing their land, while they were constantly trying to defend it. In their speeches of the last century, attitudes and the goals of Native Americans are reflected in present day writing. Th...
  • The White Mans Burden
    545 words
    The White Man's Burden In "The White Man's Burden" and in "The Recessional", Kipling outlines his idealistic concept of empire which is based on service and sacrifice. England sends some of their best man to defend and help India. The white man has the mission to civilize the Indians. It is their responsibility to culture them, to put them on the right path. They are there to make India a better place to live and bring the population up to date on the style of living. This journey will be hard, ...
  • South Africa Natives Paton Man
    1,334 words
    Social Protest Cry the Beloved Country was a book written to bring about change. Through out the book Alan Paton reveal the social injustices of South Africa. This whole book, although a fictional stories, is to protest of the ways of South Africa. Paton brings up the inequity of the natives' verses the whites; he makes points about education, superiority, and separation. Paton clearly showed that the white man is superiority to the black, he gives numerous examples throughout the novel. The wh...
  • Chief Tecumseh White Man
    552 words
    The demise of the Native Americans In my opinion, having only the education of experience, Chief Tecumseh was a very intelligent and insightful man. He realized, and refused to accept that the Native Americans were being stripped of their lives and lands through deception and violence. He then took it upon himself to bring an end to the injustices his people were being dealt. In his speech to the Osage Indian tribe, "We all belong to one family," Tecumseh acknowledged that the Native Americans h...
  • The Trail Of Tears
    623 words
    The Trail Of Tears Gloria Jahoda, the author of The Trail of Tears talks about how Indian populations dropped and how white people are the ones responsible for the drop of their population. The white men are not responsible for the drop of the Indian population. Johoda makes all Indians sound like defenseless children. Johoda is making excuses for Indians because Indians let the white man take over their lives and life style. Indians would do everything that was asked of them by the white man in...
  • White Man Mark Elders Young
    1,143 words
    The elders of the ancient Kwakiutl tribe in the book, I Heard The Owl Call My Name, by Margaret Craven, were naturally insecure with the ways of the white man, yet the tribal youth seemed eager to welcome the change in lifestyle. Mark, an Anglican minister, was sent by the Bishop to spread the ideas of the faith among the people of the Kwakiutl tribe in Kingcome. While performing his duties, he worked with the villagers on a day-to-day basis. He brought his way of life to the tribe and taught so...
  • Fools Crow White Man
    1,351 words
    Fool's Crow by James Welch is, among other things, a story of one boy's initiation into manhood, a tale that Joseph Campbell would call a 'hero's quest narrative.' At the beginning of the novel, White Man's Dog is eighteen years old but thinks he has little to show for himself, only three horses and no wives. Throughout the course of the book he goes through a step-by-step initiation ritual that leads him to manhood. First the hero must be separated from home and family. As a form of purificatio...
  • Fences White Man
    488 words
    Fences Troy Mason is a man who thinks he is a failure but finds it hard to admit. Troy is a middle age black garbage man who feels held back by the "white man." Why you got the white men driving and colored lifting?" (p. 9). the quotation mentioned is an example of how Troy feels he will never amount to anything because he is a black man in the "white man's world." Therefore, Troy limits his goals in life. Maintaining a job, having a roof over his head, and food on the table is Troy's idea of su...
  • Colonialism In Things Fall Apart
    693 words
    This essay is about the effect of Colonialism seen in the book Things Fall Apart. Through out the whole book you can see different impressions on the tribe, many other people, and the relationships between the white man and the black man. 'Does the white man understand our custom about land?' 'How can he when he does not even speak our tongue? But he says that our customs are bad; and our own brothers who have taken up his religion also say that our customs are bad. How do you think we can fight...
  • Ceremony 2 White Man
    616 words
    Ceremony Throughout Ceremony, the author, Leslie Silko, displays the internal struggle that the American Indians faced at that time in history. She displays this struggle between good and evil in several parts of the book. One is the myth explaining the org in of the white man. As common in Indian cultures they create a myth to explain why the white people came to them. The author begins to show the Indians feeling of hopelessness by showing in the myth, on pages 132 - 138, that there was no way...
  • White Man Society Life People
    953 words
    Taking a glimpse into the lives of natives from the Ibo society in Africa, including villages such as Umuofia, the high regard which is held for traditions is quite evident. It was a way of life. Religion was something that was taken very seriously, regarded as sacred; it helped define many of their customs. These customs were undoubtedly understood throughout the village, and followed without question. With this kind of structured society the specific outcome for any turn of events was made cle...
  • Little Big Man White Jack Human
    1,081 words
    Living Two Lives My heart soars like a hawk. Little Big Man was a man of many traits, of many backgrounds. At a young age his life as he knew it came a drastic halt when he and his family we attacked by Indians. He was drug from the tattered wagon by a human being and put on his horse. The Indian had taken Jack back to the others, and not long after, he fell into the tribe like he was one of the human beings. His Aunt had escaped during the night, leading jack to believe that she would return f...
  • White Man Indians Time Savage
    1,427 words
    The Conflict of the Un-Civilized The Native Americans were viewed, by the settlers, as a savage and uncivilized race; however, due to the ruthlessness towards the Indians and later the blacks, the settlers proved themselves more savage than either race. First the terms savage and civilized must be properly defined. Civilized and civilization refer to two different aspects. Civilized refers to a person or persons that are characterized by taste, refinement or restraint (Merriam-Webster's). Civili...
  • Tony White Man
    455 words
    In Tony's Story, Leslie Marm on Silko uses Leon, Tony, and Teofilo to explain the genuine reality of the cop. The genuine reality of the cop is it is an "it," standing for evil that brings drought to the Indian people. Leon does not realize the genuine reality because he has become "white." He asks if he can remember how to do the Corn Dance. "He grabbed my hand and held it tight like a white man." The wine he was drinking broke, "and the paper sack floated in the wine and pieces of glass." To f...
  • Langston Hughes An Analysis
    1,042 words
    Langston Hughes is regarded as one of the "most eloquent of American poets to have sung the wounds of political injustice." While some of his poetry can be classified as non-racial most of it can be categorized as literature of protest. Hughes background and personal beliefs were quite influential in his writing and it is reflected in his tremendous discontent for the "white man's world." Three of his works that that display this feeling and similar theme include "The Negro Speaks of Rivers,"Por...
  • Movie Review On Bowling For Columbine
    311 words
    Michael Moore's movie "Bowling for Columbine" uses the shooting rampage at Columbine High school as a touchstone. Moore sets out to examine why Americans have such a fascination with guns, shooting, and, as a result, killing. He gives many good supporting reasons why gun violence is so high in America. The one I am going to criticize is his view that the reason gun violence is so high has something to do with the legacy of slavery. Instead of zooming in on proving this, Moore puts most of his fo...
  • White Man Malcolm America Black
    3,421 words
    Malcolm X was a very important figure for the black race in America during his time. Fighting against racism, oppression and segregation, he was one of America's leaders for African American democracy and black liberation in the United States. During Malcolm's pilgrimage to the holy City of Mecca, his views of the white race drastically changed within a few months. With the society of America and the orthodox Muslim religion of Islam as his guide, Malcolm had two completely opposite views of whi...
  • Dear John Wayne Manifest Destiny And America's Cowboy
    284 words
    In Louise Erdrich's poem "Dear John Wayne," she describes the glorification of the white man's extortion of land and life from an Indian perspective. Laying on the hood of a Pontiac in a drive-in movie, a group of Indians watches the face of America's favorite cowboy as he defeats "the Sioux or some other Plains bunch." Their American made car, named after the Ottawa Indian Chief Pontiac, sits in the dark lot in a white man's world. As the movie ends, they realize the bleak reality of their exis...