• Frederic Henry Meursault One Meaning
    4,887 words
    Once we knew that literature was about life and criticism was about fiction-and everything was simple. Now we know that fiction is about other fiction, is criticism in fact, or metaphor. And we know that criticism is about the impossibility of anything being about life, really, or even about fiction, or finally about anything. Criticism has taken the very idea of "aboutness" away from us. It has taught us that language is tautological, if it is not nonsense, and to the extent that it is about a...
  • A Farewell To Arms Style
    604 words
    A Farewell to Arms: Style Critics usually describe Hemingway's style as simple, spare, and journalistic. These are all good words; they all apply. Perhaps because of his training as a newspaperman, Hemingway is a master of the declarative, subject-verb-object sentence. His writing has been likened to a boxer's punches -- combinations of lefts and rights coming at us without pause. Take the following passage: We were all cooked. The thing was not to recognize it. The last country to realize they...
  • Hemingway Indian Camp
    2,124 words
    Ernest Hemingway pulled from his past present experiences to develop his own thoughts concerning death, relationships, and lies. He then mixed these ideas, along with a familiar setting, to create a masterpiece. One such masterpiece written early in Hemingway's career is the short story, "Indian Camp."Indian Camp" was originally published in the collection of "in Our Time" in 1925. A brief summary reveals that the main character, a teenager by the name of Nick, travels across a lake to an Indian...
  • Hemingway Wrote A Book
    644 words
    Autobiography on Hemingway Earnest Hemingway Earnest Miller Hemingway was bor in in Oak Park Illinois. After graduating from high school, he got a job at a paper called 'Kansas City Star'. Hemingway continually tried to enter the military, but his defective eye, hindered this task. Hemingway had managed to get a job driving an American Red Cross ambulance. During this expedition, he was injured and hospitalized. Hemingway had an affinity for a particular nurse at that hospital, her name was Agne...
  • Hemingway Farewell To Arms
    1,433 words
    Ernest Hemingway was an American writer. He was born in 1899 in Oak Park, Illinois. He committed suicide in 1961 in Ketchum, Idaho (Burgess 17). Even today Hemingway is one of the most recognized authors in the world. Hemingway's experiences during World War I are directly shown in many of his works. His general outlook on life is reflected in the adventures of his characters. It is clear that Hemingway had a desire to be part of the war even though, due to bad vision he was unable to enlist in...
  • A Farewell To Arms
    987 words
    "A writer's job is to tell the truth" - Ernest Hemingway. This quote means that it is a writer's job to convey some sort of truth or accuracy to the reader. I agree. This is shown in the novel, A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway through the setting and characterization in the novel. It is also shown in the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee through the themes and setting of the novel. In the war novel, A Farewell to Arms, Ernest Hemingway demonstrates that it is a writer's job to ...
  • The Connection Between Ernest Hemingway And Nature
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    Ignorance is bliss. True happiness lies in simplicity. We have all heard these sayings at one point or another in our lives. Apparently, the same held true for Ernest Hemingway, as he appears to have taken them to heart. Ernest Hemingway s perception of that which was beautiful was always that which was simple. And what could possibly be any simpler than nature itself It lacks the clutter and complexity of men and technology always prattling about and disrupting things. Nature is simple, violen...
  • Ernest M Hemingway Farewell To Arms
    770 words
    Ernest M. Hemingway Do you ever ask yourself what makes life meaningful For American novelist and short-story writer Ernest Hemingway, it was courage. The characters in his works might not win, but they always live and die bravely. Hemingway told it how it was and didn't hold anything back. Hemingway is well known for his novels of war, big game hunting, fishing, and bullfighting. One of his most famous works, "The Old Man and the Sea," describes an old fisherman's fight to keep a giant fish he ...
  • A Lover Of Life Obsessed With Death
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    A Lover of Life, Obsessed with Death "Never confuse movement with action," one of Ernest Hemingway's most profound thoughts, was quoted once by Marlene Dietrich. She went on to say, "In those five words, he gave me a whole philosophy" (Bookshelf '98 NP). As one of the most brilliant and influential writers of his time, Ernest Hemingway touched the lives of many, including Ms. Dietrich, through his writing, logic, and disposition. Throughout his life he turned what was experience, and sometimes p...
  • A Nobel Writing Style Reviewed
    996 words
    Earnest Hemmingway is an accomplished author with a large audience. While short novels like The Old Man and the Sea have intrigued many, his war stories have won him a Nobel Prize. Hemmingway possesses a writing style all his own, his ability to write descriptively is unparalleled. His use of similar themes, symbolism, irony, and similar main characters is very profound. Hemmingways use of theme makes his writing style significant. In The Old Man and the Sea Santiago went through a lot of troubl...
  • Hemingway Life And Work
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    Ernest Miller Hemingway was born on July 21, 1899, in Oak Park, Illinois. His father, Dr. Clarence Edmonds Hemingway, was the owner of a prosperous real estate business and imparted to Ernest the importance of appearances, especially in public. Dr. Hemingway invented surgical forceps for which he would not accept money. He believed that one should not profit from something important for the good of mankind. Ernest's father, a man of high ideals, was very strict and censored the books he allowed...
  • Farewell To Arms Paper
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    Hemmingway has a unique style of writing. It works on multiple levels. A person could read Farewell to Arms and enjoy it as a tragic love story. Hemmingway's concise writing style allows a literal interpretation. At the same time a reader could get involved with the various symbols that he has placed in the novel. In a way everything he has can be used as a symbol depending on a person's biases. This is what makes Hemmingway's writing even more unique. He can have what seems to be a straightfor...
  • Hemingway On War Farewell To Arms
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    One common strand that runs through all of the stories are the effects of the war upon its participants. Nick Adams of "In out time" seeks to escape the harsh environment of war by enveloping himself in nature, most notably in "The Big Two-Hearted River." In the opening scene of "The Big Two-Hearted River" Nick is upset over the destruction of the town of Sene y. The town, which Nick said was not there, was burned and destroyed. After seeing the destruction of the land Nick looks to the serenity...
  • Existential Themes In Hemingway's ' A Farewell To Arms'
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    Existentialist Themes in Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms The philosophy of Existentialism demands much from its students; it requires one to view their life as a series of decisions and consequential repercussions in a world of alienation and meaninglessness, death being the only certainty. The great American author Ernest Hemingway also makes similar demands of his readers. He strips away the frills of descriptive writing, leaving only the bare bones of the story, often with no traces of hope or...
  • Farewell To Arms Frederick Life Catherine
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    A Farewell To Arms: A Critic's Review Farewell To Arms: A Critic's Review A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a typical love story. A Romeo and his Juliet placed against the odds. In this novel, Romeo is Frederick Henry, and Juliet is Catherine Barkley. Their love affair must survive the obstacles of World War I. The background of war-torn Italy adds to the tragedy of the love story. The war affects the emotions and values of each character. The love between Catherine and Frederick must...
  • A Farewell To Arms
    1,203 words
    Ernest Hemingway A Farwell To Arms Ernest Hemingway intended this book for a mature audience. Considering the way he describes the horrors of the book. Ernest Hemingway's novel A Farewell to Arms uses nature to structure the novel and provide symbols that replace human emotions. Nature serves as a basic structure for the plot and the actions that occur. It also emerges as a source of symbols that replace human sentiment or feelings. Characters die and there is no mention of sadness or pain. Ins...
  • A Farewell To Arms
    710 words
    A Farewell to Arms A Farewell to Arms, written by Ernest Hemingway, was a typical love story: a Romeo and Juliet placed against the odds. In this novel, Romeo was Frederick Henry and Juliet was Catherine Barkley. Their love had to survive the obstacles of World War I. The background of war-torn Italy added to the tragedy of the love story. The war affected the emotions and values of each character. The love between Catherine and Frederick had to withstand long separations, life-threatening situa...
  • A Farewell To Arms
    1,252 words
    A FAREWELL TO ARMS Do you agree that Farewell to Arms is as successful in the portrayal of fear and suffering as when he writes of courage and comradeship? The four themes of fear, suffering, courage and comradeship are prominent issues which are raised in the novel Farewell to Arms. The protagonist, Frederick Henry faces fear when he is injured where he admits his own fear. He shows courage without second thought when he helps injured men coming from the front. Individual suffering is shown thr...
  • A Farewell To Arms
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    In the beginning Frederic Henry, a young American ambulance driver with the Italian army in World War I, meets a beautiful English nurse named Catherine Barkley near the front between Italy and Austria-Hungary. At first Henry wants to seduce her, but when he is wounded and sent to the American hospital where Catherine works, he actually begins to love her. After his convalescence in the hospital, Henry returns to the war front. During a retreat, the Italians start to fall apart. Henry shoots an ...
  • All Quiet On The Western Front 2 2
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    Any and all events in one's life may change a person profoundly, but the effect may not always be as expected. For instance, situations of despair may cause feelings of depression and uncertainty to develop in an individual, as would likely be expected. However, those same situations could ultimately lead to a sense of fulfilment or enlightenment. In the novels All Quiet On The Western Front by Erich Remarque, The Wars by Timothy Findely, and A Farewell To Arms by Ernest Hemmingway, the varying ...