• West Wind Shelley Word Reader
    1,469 words
    In "Ode to the West Wind," Percy Bys she Shelley tries to gain transcendence, for he shows that his thoughts, like the "winged seeds" (7) are trapped. The West Wind acts as a driving force for change and rejuvenation in the human and natural world. Shelley views winter not just as last phase of vegetation but as the last phase of life in the individual, the imagination, civilization and religion. Being set in Autumn, Shelley observes the changing of the weather and its effects on the internal an...
  • Aristotle On Nature Great Chain
    490 words
    The Great Chain of Being Most of the concepts about the nature of living things in the early modern era were derived from the writings of Aristotle. Aristotle wrote about the concept of distinct types of organisms that could be distinguished from all the rest. Aristotle was interested in much more than the biological world, and attempted to build a theory of the world as a whole. As part of this theory, he believed that all of nature could be seen as a continuum of organization from lifeless mat...
  • Environmental Activism Natural World
    2,668 words
    1. The large mainstream environmentalism groups started to compromise too much with regulatory agencies and bureaus, starting with the Glen Canyon Dam project. This began an estrangement with the mainstreams that culminated in the rise of more militant groups like Earth First! Glen Canyon represented what was fundamentally wrong with the country's conservation policies: arrogant government officials motivated by a quasi religious zeal to industrialize the natural world, and a diffident bureaucra...
  • Natural World Leopold Mountain Deer
    1,026 words
    Realization of Nature's Significance In Thinking Like a Mountain, the author, Aldo Leopold, writes of the importance of wildlife preservation through examples of the symbiotic relationship of animals and plant-life with a mountain. He asks the reader to perceive the processes of a mountainous environment in an unusual way. Aldo Leopold wants the reader to "think" like a mountain instead of thinking of only the immediate, or as the hunter did. Taking away one feature of an ecosystem may eventuall...
  • The Sixth Extinction Leakey World Asteroid
    1,186 words
    So, what is the Sixth Extinction When is it coming and what is its cause It is happening now, and we, the human race are its cause explains Richard Leakey. This phenomenon Leakey argues, is easily comparable with the big five biological crisis' of geological history, except this one is not being caused by global temperature change, regression of sea level, or asteroid impact. It is being caused by one of Earth's inhabitants. According to Leakey, humanity is poised to become the greatest catastro...
  • Shelleys Ode To The West Wind Analysis
    1,479 words
    Shelley's 'Ode To the West Wind': Analysis In 'Ode to the West Wind,' Percy Bys she Shelley tries to gain transcendence, for he shows that his thoughts, like the 'winged seeds' (7) are trapped. The West Wind acts as a driving force for change and rejuvenation in the human and natural world. Shelley views winter not just as last phase of vegetation but as the last phase of life in the individual, the imagination, civilization and religion. Being set in Autumn, Shelley observes the changing of the...
  • Natural World Hawkeye Higher Movie
    791 words
    The last of the Mohicans In the movie Last of the Mohicans the character Hawkeye displays many characteristics that make him an American romantic hero. Throughout the entire movie he displays these characteristics. The most prominent of these being his closeness with nature. His sense of honor based not on society s rules but on some higher principal, his knowledge of people and of life based on deep, intuitive understanding, not on formal learning, and his quests for some higher truth in the na...
  • Edgar Allen Poe's The Murders In The Rue Morgue
    1,026 words
    Edgar Allen Poe's: 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' In Edgar Allen Poe's short story, 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue', a classic detective story is played out in a seedy Paris suburb. The story begins as the narrator meets Monsieur C. Auguste Dupin, a poor but well-read young man. As they become close friends, they live together in seclusion, departing only briefly each evening to take introspective strolls along the dark Paris streets. Soon both the reader and the narrator begin to see Dupin's i...
  • Natural World Nature Wordsworth Ovid
    1,681 words
    In both William Wordsworth's poems and David Malouf's novel, An Imaginary Life, it is evident how different times and cultures affect the quality and importance of the relationship humanity can have with the natural world. Themes that are explored in both texts include interaction with nature, the role of nature in childhood and adulthood, religion and the role of language. These all show the quality and importance of humanity's relationship with nature and how times and culture influence the re...
  • Transmigration Of The Soul Plato's Theory Of Human Knowledge
    881 words
    Plato contended that all true knowledge is recollection. He stated that we all have innate knowledge that tells us about the things we experience in our world. This knowledge, Plato believed, was gained when the soul resided in the invisible realm, the realm of The Forms and The Good. Plato's theory of The Forms argued that everything in the natural world is representative of the ideal of that form. For example, a table is representative of the ideal form Table. The form is the perfect ideal on ...
  • Critique Of Robert Frost
    925 words
    Marion Montgomery, "Robert Frost and His Use of Barriers: Man vs. Nature Toward God," Englewood Cliffs, NJ; Prentice-Hall, Inc. , 1962. Reprinted by permission of The South Atlantic Quarterly. Robert Frost is considered by the casual reader to be a poet of nature like that of a Wordsworth. In a sense, his poetry is about nature, yet with strong underlying tones of the drama of man in nature. Frost himself stated, "I guess I'm not a nature poet," I have only written two without a human being in ...
  • Art Of The Ages
    733 words
    The main focus of art from the Early Middle Ages to the Renaissance period involved fundamental changes in the way individuals viewed their world. A central element of the Renaissance was the rediscovery of ancient world of Greece and Rome. The ancient classics of philosophy, literature, and science inspired the development of empirical methods to pursue studies in these fields. As Europeans became increasingly aware of classical knowledge some like Galileo began to build on that knowledge actua...
  • Biosphere Politics Natural World
    600 words
    Jeremy Rifkin is an immensely persuasive writer and a fine synthesizer of cutting-edge ideas. Over the years he's taken on touchy subjects like the beef industry, energy consumption, green economics, and the future of work. As the president and founder of the Foundation on Economic Trends, he's also been active in shaping public policy on a variety of ecological and technological issues. In this book, he explores how the last five centuries of human history have shaped our relationship to the na...
  • Deep Ecology And Religion
    1,211 words
    Through this portion of class readings and discussions, we have sought deeper meaning and understanding of philosophies of individuals and organizations that revolve around the fundamental aspects and notions of deep ecology and eco-activism. These associations offer more views and attitudes on how an individual and society can create and maintain a kinship and positive influence with the natural environment. Like deep ecologist's view on the metaphysical relationship of man and nature. Eco-acti...
  • Environmental Activism Natural World
    1,373 words
    ... stewardship as that implies dominance. Instead we believe, as did Aldo Leopold, that we should be plain citizens of the land community'. This meant no permanent human habitation (with minor exceptions); no use of mechanized equipment or vehicles; no roads; no logging, mining, water diversion, industrial activity, agriculture, or grazing; no use of artificial chemical substances; no suppression of wildfires; no overflights by aircraft; no priority given to the safety and convenience of human ...
  • Wildlife Extinction Rate For Living Species The Ozone
    879 words
    The "cry of the wild" can still be heard across this great land. I have heard the bugle of an elk on the Great Plains... the shrill of a bald eagle along the banks of the mightily Mississippi... the roar of a brown eagle bear on windswept tundra... and the gobble of a wild turkey among western foothills. Amazing beauty can still be found in the natural landscapes of this great land. I have seen through televisions, articles, books, and newspapers the towering forests... pristine waters... rich ...
  • Seamus Heaney Portrayal Of Natural World
    1,239 words
    Referring to 'Blackberry Picking' and 'Death of a Naturalist', Discuss Heaney's portrayal of the natural world and his relationship to it Heaney uses the natural world and his relationship with it in order to express how as a result of age his views on the natural world have changed. Initially, Heaney was positive and hopeful regarding the world around him 'Best of all'. Through knowledge, teaching and education this judgement has been clouded leaving him to see the world as disappointing and th...
  • Camparitive Essay Of Blade Runner And Brave New World
    802 words
    There are vast similarities and differences in the futuristic dystopias explored in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Although composed half a century apart, both arose in contexts of rapid technological change and evolving / changing social mores. Both texts reveal the effect of human interference with natural processes and environments. But the most significant contrast is in their views of the intrinsic worth of humans. After WWI the world plunged into disillus...
  • Alienation Marx Work World Alienated
    863 words
    Alienation The Marxist concept in which I felt most comfortable discussing is alienation. Alienation may be described as a condition in which men are dominated by forces of their own creation, which confront them as alien powers. The notion is important to all of Marx's earlier philosophical writings and still informs his later work. Man becomes foreign or alienated to the world he is living in because he basically can not control the material possessions of his own life. Man in a capitalistic s...
  • Environmental Activism 1 Natural World
    2,669 words
    1. The large mainstream environmentalism groups started to compromise too much with regulatory agencies and bureaus, starting with the Glen Canyon Dam project. This began an estrangement with the mainstreams that culminated in the rise of more militant groups like Earth First! Glen Canyon represented what was fundamentally wrong with the country's conservation policies: arrogant government officials motivated by a quasi religious zeal to industrialize the natural world, and a diffident bureaucra...