• Dickinson Vs Whitman Poetry Emily Walt
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    Dickinson vs. Whitman After receiving five years of schooling, Walt Whitman spent four years learning the printing trade; Emily Dickinson returned home after receiving schooling to be with her family and never really had a job. Walt Whitman spent most of his time observing people and New York City. Dickinson rarely left her house and she didn't associate with many people other than her family. In this essay I will be comparing Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman. Emily Dickinson's life differs gre...
  • Walt Whitman War Civil Taps
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    walt whitman A World of Politics Thesis: Walt Whitman was a man who used his thoughts on political issues concerning the Civil War within his writings because of many experiences he had encountered. Whenever ever the term "political writing" comes up, most people would think of Walt Whitman. Walt Whitman was one of the most popular political writers of all times. "Nearly everyone agrees that Walt Whitman is America 's greatest poet" (Unger 331). "Whitman's ideas and attitudes were chiefly those ...
  • Walt Whitman 3 Man Democracy God
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    Mysticism, Democracy, Individuality&Personality The 1881 publication of the Leaves of Grass contained more than twenty-four poems, which were reasonably filled with ten or more diversified types of themes. Walt Whitman the author and compiler of this exceptional work changed the status of poetry writing through his utilization of thought and expression in the publication of the Leaves of Grass. Ralph Waldo Emerson, a collogue and admirer of Walt once spoke this of him '... Whitman, that Sir, is ...
  • American Influences Of Walt Whitman
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    American Influences of Walt Whitman In his poems and life, Walt Whitman celebrated the human spirit and the human body. He sang the praises of democracy and marveled at the technological advances of his era. His direct poetic style shocked many of his contemporaries. This style, for which Whitman is famous, is in direct relation to several major American cultural developments. The development of American dictionaries, the growth of baseball, the evolution of Native American policy, and the deve...
  • Walt Whitman Wrote Grass Whitmans
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    Walt Whitman An American poet, whose work boldly asserts the worth of the individual and the oneness of all humanity. Walt Whitmans defiant break with traditional poetic concerns and style exerted a major influence on American thought and literature. He is something that no other country could have produced. He is utterly lawless, and in consequence passes for being a great original genius. His produce is unlike anything else that has ever appeared in literature, and that is enough for those qua...
  • A True Patriot Walt Whitman
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    A True Patriot: Walt Whitman When one talks of great American Poets, if the person has any since of intelligence, then they can in now way fail to mention Walt Whitman. Whitman is a great American poet, So great, that Ralph Waldo Emerson said that he was an "American Shakespeare" (Tucker 247). While the debate still goes on about that comment, there is no debate about the greatness of Whitman. Walt Whitman was born in West Hills, NY on May 31, 1819 on Long Island. He was the second of nine child...
  • Walt Whitman Published Grass Time
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    Sophie OshmanMrs. DubrowPeriod 7 May 4 th, 2004 Walt Whitman Walt Whitman, born in 1819 to a family in Long Island, lived a very humble life before becoming a well known writer. He grew up in a community full of Quakers and followed religion very strictly as a child. Whitman loved reading the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson because he thought he related to Emerson's ideas and theologies which closely corresponded to his own. At the age of 35, Whitman published his first book, Leaves of Grass, which...
  • Walt Whitman Equal People Death
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    Walt Whiteman though himself out to be the poet of American democracy. His poetry described an america where the future had already begun. Whitman believed every individual had as much dignity, and importance as anyone else. No job was considered to small or insubordinate. He believed that in order to reach their full potential, people had to break down the barriers that separated them from others and from parts of their own being. He encouraged things that made people less embarrassed and mr o...
  • Walt Whitman Grass Leaves Song
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    Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was a follower of the two Transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. He believed in Emerson and Thoreau's Transcendentalist beliefs. Whitman believed that individualism stems from listening to one's inner voice and that one's life is guided by one's intuition. The Transcendentalist centered on the divinity of each individual; but this divinity could be self-discovered only if the person had the independence of mind to do so. Whitman lent himself to t...
  • Walt Woman's Biography Love Poems Whitman
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    Walt Whitman was a nineteenth century poet, who successfully introduced a new kind of poetry to American public. Walt Whitman, influenced by his love of his country and by the time period, wrote poetry about America during the mid to late 1800 s. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819. He was born in West Hills, Long Island, New York, which was near Huntington, New York. He was the second child in the family. He had eight brothers and sisters. His father was working as a carpenter and his mother...
  • Walt Whitman War Drums Bugles
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    Walt Whitman Walt Whitman wasn't a very big fan of war. He thought everything about it was negative. We can see this in his poetry. In "Beat! Beat! Drums!" , he expresses his feelings toward war using symbolism. The drums and the bugles are examples of two symbols. He is using these objects as representing war. Whitman starts off each stanza with the same line every time. "Beat! Beat! drums! - blow! bugles! blow!" He uses this symbolism of war to show the effects it has on the world. The drums ...
  • Supermarket In California And Constantly Risking Absurdity
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    "A Supermarket in California" and "Constantly Risking Absurdity" Allen Ginsberg's poem "A Supermarket in California" and Lawrence Ferlinghetti's poem "Constantly Risking Absurdity" describe the struggle within to find beauty and self worth. Where Allen Ginsberg is lost in the market, desperately trying to find inspiration from Walt Whitman, Lawrence Ferlinghetti portrays the image of the poet frantically trying to balance on a high wire, risking not only absurdity, but also death. Both of these ...
  • What Whitman Walt Read Poems
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    Walt Whitman Walt Whitman, a famous American poet, was born on May 31, 1819 in the West Hills of Long Island, New York. His mothers name was Lois ia Van Vel sor, of Dutch descent. , and amazingly could not read very well, if at all. His dad was an English carpenter who probably could not read his sons poetry. His parents family consisted of nine children, four of whom had disabilities. His start in literature came when, at the age of 12, he was withdrawn from school to work as a printer. At thi...
  • Walt Whitman Death Bird Love
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    Palomo 1 Michael Palomo American Literature Professor Sanchez May 9, 2000 Walt Whitman: An American Poet The ability to pinpoint the birth or beginning of the poet lifestyle is rare. It is rare for the observer as it is for the writer. The Walt Whitman poem Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking is looked at by most as just that. It is a documentation, of sorts, of his own paradigm shift. The realities of the world have therein matured his conceptual frameworks. In line 147 we read "Now in a moment...
  • Langston Hughes Walt Whitman
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    Poetry in Motion - Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was a poet that lived from 1902-1967. He was a very distinguished poet of the Harlem Renaissance, the great out pouring of african-american art. The poetry of Langston Hughes is very different, yet it held the reader's attention. As a poet, he defines his role as a poet. Hughes has a very unconventional style, subject content, and language, though he gives his intended messages in the same way as the poets of the past have done. Langston Hughes ...
  • Emily Dickinson And Walt Whitman
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    Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman both discussed the themes of love and death, in the different styles of poetry, which newly distinguished the romantic Era. Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman are two of literature's greatest innovators, they each changed the face of American literature. They are considered one of literature's greatest pair of opposites. Whitman and Dickinson's writing are described as decades ahead of its time. They were poetic pioneers because of the new ideas they used in their ...
  • Arthur Rimbaud Walt Whitman
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    Walt Whitman, William Blake, and Arthur Rimbaud are three nineteenth century poets who shared styles, philosophies, and views of the world. They were writers searching for enlightenment and understanding of the world in which they lived; a world held in contempt for the injustices and inhumanities suffered by or because of it's people. Many of these authors' works would embody a clear disdain for ideals that went against those Whitman, Blake, and Rimbaud held so dear. They told their stories tho...
  • American Poets Compare Walt Whitman
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    Compare and contrast the work of at least two poets on the theme of American society and its values. Walt Whitman (1819-92) wrote, The chief reason for the being of the United States of America is to bring about the common good will of all mankind, the solidarity of the world (Leaves of Grass). Walt Whitman, one of the most influential poets to come out of America was a true patriot. This loyalty to his country is clear in his poetry which continually praises the United States, and was born out ...
  • American Sign Language Emily
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    Emily Dickinson and Uncle Walt Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman are two of literature's greatest innovators, they each changed the face of American literature. they are also considered one of literature's greatest pair of opposites. Dickinson is a timid wreck loose. While Whitman was very open and sociable, Whitman shares the ideas of William Cullen Bryant, everyone and everything is somehow linked by a higher bond. Both Whitman and Dickinson were decades ahead of their time, sharing only the un...
  • Walt Whitman Lincoln President 2000
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    The Lincoln Assasination's Impact On Walt Whitman The Lincoln Assasination's Impact On Walt Whitman On the night of the awful tragedy an unreal action occurred in the box at the theater. Watching was the greatest man of his time in the glory of the most stupendous success story in our history. He was the idolized chief of a nation already mighty, and a symbol to all of the grandeur of a great nation. Quick death was to come on the central figure of that company — the central figure of the ...