• Freedom And Reason In Kant
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    Freedom and Reason in Kant Alice Fur nari 24 /2/97 Morality, Kant says, cannot be regarded as a set of rules which prescribe the means necessary to the achievement of a given end; its rules must be obeyed without consideration of the consequences that will follow from doing so or not. A principle that presupposes a desired object as the determinant of the will cannot give rise to a moral law; that is, the morality of an act of will cannot be determined by the matter or content of the will for wh...
  • Kant's Formalism Theory Categorical Imperative
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    Kant's Formalism Theory The theories of Immanuel Kant, a German philosopher, have had an impact on the formulation and shaping of ethics today. Immanuel Kant graced this earth from 1724 to 1804. During his eighty year life time, he formulated many interesting ideas regarding ethical conduct and motivation. Kant is strictly a non-consequential ist philosopher, which means that he believes that a person's choices should have nothing to do with the desired outcome, but instead mankind simply goes a...
  • Kant Highest Good
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    Essay One: Immanuel Kant was a from Germany in the eighteenth century. He believed that the only test of whether a decision is right or wrong is whether it could be applied to everyone. Would it be all right for everyone to do what you are doing? If not, your decision is wrong. It would be wrong, for example, to make a promise with the intention of breaking it because if everyone did that, no one would believe anyone's promises. In ethics, Kant tried to show that doing one's duty consisted in fo...
  • Kant Vs Mill Moral Act
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    Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant was born, lived and passed away in his home town of Konigsberg. He lived from 1724 to 1804. He studied at the local university and later returned to tutor and lecture students. It wasn't until he met an English merchant by the name of Joseph Green that Kant learned of David Hume and began to develop his ideas of morals and values. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (1781) is believed by many to be his greatest work. Kant's was known mainly, however, for his moral code The...
  • Categorical Imperative Kant Morals Moral
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    Kant states (38, ) "act as if the maxim of thy action were to become by thy will a universal law of nature." This "categorical imperative" forms the basis of his book, Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals. Though at times his writing is confusing Kant lays out his logic as to what a categorical imperative is. Kant divides the book into three sections. The first explains the transition from everyday moral beliefs to the philosophy of those morals. The transition from popular moral...
  • Categorical Imperative Evidence Maxim Truth
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    Immanuel Kant was a de ontologist, who believed that right actions bind us, or where the right actions come from it, not from consequences. Kantian philosophy outlines the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative as a method for determining morality of actions. Kant also introduces the notion of the categorical imperative the principle that is followed by all rational and reasonable beings, it is an imperative that we learn a priori by analyzing the nature of morality. A priori is n...
  • Immanuel Kant Categorical Imperative
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    Kant is a de ontological philosopher; that is, in examining morality he says that the ends must not be looked at, only the means. Kant began by carefully drawing a pair of crucial distinctions among the judgments we do actually make. The first distinction separates a priori from a posterior i judgments by reference to the origin of our knowledge of them. A priori judgments are statements for which there is no appeal to experience in order to determine what is true and false. A posterior i judgme...
  • Kant The Universal Law Formation Of The Categorical Imperative
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    Kant: the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative Kantian philosophy outlines the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative as a method for determining morality of actions. This formula is a two part test. First, one creates a maxim and considers whether the maxim could be a universal law for all rational beings. Second, one determines whether rational beings would will it to be a universal law. Once it is clear that the maxim passes both prongs of the test, there are n...
  • Kantian Morality Morally Permissible
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    Kantian Morality Kant's theory of morality seems to function as the most feasible in determining one's duty in a moral situation. The basis for his theory is perhaps the most noble of any -- acting morally because doing so is morally right. His ideas, no matter how occasionally vague or overly rigid, work easily and efficiently in most situations. Some exceptions do exist, but the strength of those exceptions may be somewhat diminished by looking at the way the actual situations are presented an...
  • Deontological Ethics Categorical Imperative
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    Deontological Theory of Ethics Introduction When ethics is explored, and an inquiry into its origin and sources are explored to find definition and clarity around ethics, one initial discovery will be that two main views on ethical behavior emerge. One of those theories is the de ontological theory of ethics. Ethics and ethical decisions surround themselves around what is the goodness or badness of any particular choice or decision. When exploring ethics, it is necessary to explore what are the ...
  • Kant And Morality Universal Law
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    Kant and Morality Kant had a different ethical system which was based on reason. According to Kant reason was the fundamental authority in determining morality. All humans possess the ability to reason, and out of this ability comes two basic commands: the hypothetical imperative and the categorical imperative. In focusing on the categorical imperative, in this essay I will reveal the underlying relationship between reason and duty. The categorical imperative suggests that a course of action mu...
  • Kant's Categorical Imperative Applied
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    Kant describes the categorical imperative as "expressed by an ought and thereby indicate the relation of an objective law of reason to a will that is not necessarily determined by this law because of its subjective constitution." In other words, a categorical imperative is a command of morality that applies everywhere at all times no matter what, without exception. Kant describes two forms of imperatives, hypothetical and categorical. Kant defines the hypothetical imperative as "an action is goo...
  • Objections To The First Formulation Of Kant's Categorical Imperative
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    Deontology is the ethical view that some actions are morally forbidden or permitted regardless of consequences. One of the most influential de ontological philosophers in history is Immanuel Kant who developed the idea of the Categorical Imperative. Kant believed that the only thing of intrinsic moral worth is a good will. Kant says in his work Morality and Rationality "The good will is not good because of what it effects or accomplishes or because of it's adequacy to achieve some proposed end; ...
  • Categorical Imperative Schindler Jews Kant
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    When a Jewish girl living in Krakow under false papers visits Schindler, she asks that he hire her parents to work in his factory. He is infuriated with the girl and she runs from him, fearing her life and liberty. Schindler expresses his rage at Stern, whom he accuses of harboring Jews in the 'haven' of a factory. Schindler is not angry at the idea of his factory as a haven, but the fact that such activities are illegal. However, as the atrocities of the Nazis become more apparent, Schindler be...
  • Kant And Categorical Imperatives
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    In order to evaluate one's actions whether they are moral or not, we use many moral dilemmas. One of them is Kant's categorical imperative. This essay presents Kant's project of categorical imperative. Then, I will explain that rulers should appeal to Kant's categorical imperative when making foreign policy decision. In order to support my point of view, I will give importance to the reasons of why rulers appeal to categorical imperative when making foreign policy, so I have two reasons for this...
  • Categorical Imperative Kant Moral One
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    The Categorical Imperative Of Immanuel Kant's Philosophy What would you do if you saw a little old lady with a cane walking slowly across a busy street without remembering to look both ways? Most people would answer that they would run out into the street to save her. However, why would these people do this? The rescuer may have not had any relation whatsoever to the little old lady, yet they still decide to risk their life for her. Was it because of basic, natural instinct? Did the rescuer just...
  • Kant's Fundamental Principles Of The Metaphysics Of Moral
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    Kant's Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Moral The central concept of Kant's Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals is the categorical imperative. "The conception of an objective principle, in so far as it is obligatory for a will, is called a command (of reason), and the formula of the command is called an Imperative." (Abbott, 30) An imperative is something that a will ought or shall do because the will is obligated to actin the manner in which it conforms with moral la...
  • Kant The Universal Law Formation Of The Categorical Imperative
    1,539 words
    Kant: the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative Kantian philosophy outlines the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative as a method for determining morality of actions. This formula is a two part test. First, one creates a maxim and considers whether the maxim could be a universal law for all rational beings. Second, one determines whether rational beings would will it to be a universal law. Once it is clear that the maxim passes both prongs of the test, there are n...
  • The Categorical Imperative Applied To A False Promise
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    The Categorical Imperative Applied to a False Promise In the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant seeks to establish the supreme principle of morality (Kant. 392), the categorical imperative, to act as a standard to which actions can be evaluated for their moral worth. Kant believes that actions motivated by personal experience, whether through observation, indoctrination or some other capacity, lack moral worth because such actions are not determined by the conception of moral law. Wh...
  • An Overview Of Immanuel Kant
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    An overview of Immanuel Kant By Scott Haywood Philosophy 101 Harold McSwain, Ph. D. The exploration into Immanuel Kant? s thought is one of, insight, perception, and open-mindedness. His work in the field of philosophy and intellectual development spanned over thirty-five years. He wrote on virtually all philosophical topics but his love was in the branch of metaphysics. His role in the evolvement of modern thought is vast and profound. Immanuel Kant was born, lived, and died in Konigsberg, Eas...