• Feminism In Christian Ethics
    544 words
    In Feminism And Christian Ethics, Lisa Sole Cahill argues that feminist ethics has much to offer Catholicism. For one, the main issues that concern feminist ethics are basically the same ones that make up Catholic identity. That is, how women and men define themselves in society, what means are available to them for attaining their ends- in short inter personal and social relations. Second, the founding principles that guide feminist ethics are rooted in the tradition of natural law, a tradition...
  • Analysis Of Thrasymachus Justice Unjust Man
    1,497 words
    Analysis of Thrasymachus Throughout "The Republic" there exist different characters that each holds a unique importance towards the development of certain philosophies, in this case, the meaning of "justice." Thrasymachus is such a character, which could be considered a cynic by some; he plays an imperative role in the quest for the meaning of justice in the first book of "The Republic." While Cephalus and his son Polemarchus are unsuccessful in providing Socrates with an adequate definition of ...
  • Statesman Vs Politician George Washington
    656 words
    When talking about a person who is trying to run for election in our country, two terms get thrown around loosely, a politician and a statesman. However, there is a difference between the two. A Politician is a leader engaged in civil administration whose main objective is to get elected. Human affairs are not that important to him, he just wants the title. A Statesman however takes interest in human affairs and works for the common good to help people. (web) George Washington can be defined as ...
  • Political Parties Labor Party
    2,243 words
    The Labor Party The labor Party is made up of men and women who do and do not have jobs. They believe themselves to be the keepers of the American dream, providing opportunity and justice. They believe that every American has the right to a decent paying job and a good place to live, that by joining the union there should be no fear of getting fired, to free, quality public education for themselves and their children, to universal access to publicly fund, comprehensive, quality health care for a...
  • President Bush Power Machiavelli Nuclear
    1,443 words
    George Bush and Niccolo Machiavelli are two very influential political figures that share some similar ideals. Machiavelli's work was never intended to be applied to republics, or a democratic government. The advice written in The Prince would have likely been applied in the time of absolute government, when countries were ruled by one leader. It is a work which, as Machiavelli himself says that his philosophy is only applied to principalities, or what we call dictatorships in modern times. Elec...
  • Aristotle Middle Class
    1,020 words
    Atirtotle's Politics Aristotle's Politics is a timeless examination of government structure and human nature that explains his ideas on how a utopian state can be achieved. In this work, Aristotle examines ubiquitous issues such as government structure, education, crime, property ownership, the honesty of occupations, and population control. He states in Book IV, Chapter Eleven .".. the best form of political association is one where power is vested in the middle class, and secondly, that good g...
  • Common Good Welfare Person Social
    604 words
    Is Welfare in Keeping with the Norms of Social Justice In order to answer this question we must first begin with the starting point of all Catholic Social Teaching; the dignity of the human person. All social action, and activities, between individuals, lesser organizations, and the governing body must seek the common good of all society and of the individual person. The common good is that objective moral standard which takes into account the whole of man and woman in their material and spiritu...
  • Middle Class Government Good Aristotle
    1,017 words
    Atirtotle's Politics Aristotle's Politics is a timeless examination of government structure and human nature that explains his ideas on how a utopian state can be achieved. In this work, Aristotle examines ubiquitous issues such as government structure, education, crime, property ownership, the honesty of occupations, and population control. He states in Book IV, Chapter Eleven '... the best form of political association is one where power is vested in the middle class, and secondly, that good g...
  • The Miracle Man Kent State
    1,506 words
    Rousseau vs. self-interest and progress In The Social Contract, Rousseau asserts the idea of the people's General Will being the ideal governing force of the state. This idea is essentially the total alienation of each individual to the entire community, thus constructing the Sovereign. The collective body rules in the common interest, acting without individual bias or selfish concerns, to decide the laws that the Sovereign itself is to follow. However rightly intended, this concept is flawed b...
  • Aristotle Middle Class
    1,198 words
    In our fast paced technologically advanced society today, our governments have evolved into supposedly well oiled machines effectively managing budgets, jails, milit aries, as well as many other programs. Unfortunately, many of these governments are not as well organized, as they could be. Democratic countries like France, Germany, and even the United States have some very serious shortcomings to the way their governments are managed. These problems occur, many times at a very basic level, rathe...
  • Justice In The Republic
    1,001 words
    Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote "One man's justice is another's injustice." This statement quite adequately describes the relation between definitions of justice presented by Polemarchus and Thrasymachus in Book I of the Republic. Polemarchus initially asserts that justice is "to give to each what is owed" (Republic 331 d), a definition he picked up from Simonides. Then, through the unrelenting questioning of Socrates, Polemarchus' definition evolves into "doing good to friends and harm to enemie...
  • Machiavelli Vs Islamic Political Thought
    2,520 words
    Machiavelli vs Islamic Political Thought Niccolo Machiavelli was a political realist. He thought there were certain skills and characteristics needed to become a political ruler. In his work, The Prince, Machiavelli gives advice on how to be a successful prince, or ruler. "Successful" is partly based on how powerful a ruler was during his lifetime (reign), but largely based on how much the prince affected the lives, through laws or societal norms, of future generations. Machiavelli was mainly i...
  • Rousseau On Civil Religion
    1,662 words
    Religion is a component of almost every society. Knowing this, one might look at the function it serves. For Jean-Jacques Rousseau, religion, specifically a civil religion established by the Sovereign, is an instrument of politics that serves a motivating function. In a new society people are unable to understand the purpose of the law. Therefore, civil religion motivates people to obey the law because they fear some divine being. For a developed society, civil religion motivates people to main...
  • Classical Republican Rights Individual Good
    586 words
    The Founding Fathers views on government were influenced by both the classical republican and the natural rights philosophers. The two groups of philosophers held very different views on how a government should run. The classical republicans believed that the individual should sacrifice his or her personal freedoms in order to gain the greater good. The natural rights philosophers, on the other hand, held that a persons individual freedoms out to be preserved at all costs. The two greatest examp...
  • Political Philosophy Common Good
    2,875 words
    Political philosophy are the theories and ideas of those who believe that they have an answer to the questions that politics raise in society. The questions that these political philosophers set out to answer range from describing what the state of nature is to what type of regimes are necessary to tame and organize the nature of man. The ideas that they come up with are not all that original. Plato, an early political philosopher and student of Socrates, set out to come up with a society that w...
  • Aquinas On Kingship Common Good
    812 words
    On Kingship Chapter 12 In this chapter, Aquinas focused on the duties and responsibilities of a king. He thinks that, nature shows us how to act with reason; and the best way to learn the duties of a king is focusing on the examples of government that can be found in nature. He means, to learn something, first its substance that is nature, should be observed. According to Aquinas, nature consists both a universal and particular form of government. God is the ruler of the universal government and...
  • Consent Of The Rule Man Good Aristotle
    2,021 words
    The Wise Ruling the Unwise: Seeking the Consent of the Masses The most difficult thing for a regime to achieve is that of acquiring the best ruler, with the consent of the ruled. Aristotle acknowledges this in his works The Politics, and Caius Marci us Coriolanus faces this difficult task in the Shakespeare play The Tragedy of Coriolanus. We even see this same difficult task arise in contemporary politics, as the masses are wooed one way or the other with sound bites, and talk show appearances, ...
  • Is Morality A Matter Of Comparative Politics
    998 words
    As physical items such as fire, contain substances that determines how they will behave, so do people. A persons 'essence' or character will determine how they will react regarding their morals. In this time of violence, terrorism and corruption it is no wonder that the question of morality is raised. It is obvious in this day and age, that morality is a puzzle in comparative politics, and although, culture and ethnicity is a key factor in comparing governments, the role of morality seems to hav...
  • The Good Samaritan Law Or Bad
    1,530 words
    The definition of good and bad can be divided into the good and the bad. Every person lives by their own ideals of what is "good" and what they think is "bad." One ideal example of the moral vs. immoral viewpoint is outlined by the Good Samaritan Law. This law offers immunity from liability for a person if they choose to assist another in an emergency. In order for me to have come to the decision that the law ought to require people to be Good Samaritans, there were many important factors and ph...