• Substance Abuse Increasing In Inner City Minorities
    1,149 words
    Substance Abuse Increasing in Inner-City Minorities Substance abuse is an ever increasing epidemic facing America's inner-city minorities. There are several different drugs that are gaining popularity amongst inner-city youths 1. Juice, that is marijuana soaked in embalming fluid is starting to show up in more and more inner east coast cities 2. Crack or rock cocaine is by far one of the most addicting drugs out there, it's been engulfing America's inner-cities since the early 80's 3. Heroin, is...
  • The Caucasian Chalk Circle By Bertolt Brecht
    877 words
    The Caucasian Chalk Circle The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Brecht uses epic theatre to bring forth an idea or meaning for the audience to consider while entertaining the audience. Epic theatre involves the use of alienation techniques to distance the viewer from the story but still concentrate on the overall meaning. The person who just views the story would likely take it as fantasy and not reach the true depth of the play. Brecht shocks the viewer by making the events and actions in the play "st...
  • The Caucasian Chalk Circle
    859 words
    The Caucasian Chalk Circle The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Brecht uses epic theatre to bring forth an idea or meaning for the audience to consider while entertaining the audience. Epic theatre involves the use of alienation techniques to distance the viewer from the story but still concentrate on the overall meaning. The person who just views the story would likely take it as fantasy and not reach the true depth of the play. Brecht shocks the viewer by making the events and actions in the play 'st...
  • Lower Class Victorian Dracula Lucy
    1,846 words
    The Victorian men and women conveyed in Bram Stoker's Dracula are pure and virtuous members of the upper and middle class. However, hiding behind this composed and civilized conception of England lies a dark and turbulent underbelly. This underbelly is the lumpenproletariat, whom Karl Marx defined as 'the lowest and most degraded section of the proletariat; the 'down and outs' who make no contribution to the workers cause'. Victorian culture discriminated against these vagrants, who were seen no...
  • The Fall Of Western Roman Empire
    1,879 words
    The fall of the Roman Empire is generally perceived to have culminated through one single, though profound, event: the sack of the great city of Rome. The event itself, where the glory of Rome and all it represented came crashing down, is often perceived to be the marking stone for the end of Antiquity and the beginning of the Middle Ages. However, the actual "fall" of the empire consists of more than just the invasion of Rome by the Goths, and the causes of this collapse, and what it represente...
  • Mrs Elton Emma Harriet Time
    1,413 words
    Emma Essay on the social activities& balls, their importance & enjoy ability throughout the novel etc. Throughout the novel, we see many ways in which social events & activities revolve around the central characters & the theme of status & marriage. Emma takes part in all of the activities throughout the novel, as she is the one trying to use these activities to match-make & lead others. We see Emma taking part in all of these events whether balls, painting or walking. These are ...
  • Relations Between Social Classes Of The 17th Century
    2,392 words
    Disparity and Concord: Relations Between the Social Classes of the 17 th Century A traditional way of thinking about separate and distinct social classes includes the assumption that there will be a strained relationship between the two; in which mutual feelings of mistrust and fear will be present due to the inherent inequality and ignorance that exists between the groups. During the 17 th century, this sense of disparity between the classes was certainly felt and acknowledged, but it was not a...
  • Gilber And Kohl Class Education Classes
    1,189 words
    In medieval England, people were divided not by race or sex, but rather class. From the noble men and women at the top to the peasants at the bottom, each was bound to the class in which they were born into. To change your fate was something unheard of in those times. The founding fathers of the United States of America saw a vision of a nation where all men are created equal. This vision saw a constant interchanging class system. Today, the US sticks by this ability to break free from the mold...