• Kyoto Greenhouse Gas
    1,095 words
    Kyoto? As the amount of greenhouse gas emissions increases a plan of action has been introduced, know as the 'Kyoto Protocol.' As of July 2002 seventy-six of earth's one-hundred ninety countries have agreed to cut their emissions under the 'Kyoto Protocol.' However, only Japan has set some goals, that currently seem unattainable. Alberta, and many of the people and businesses in Alberta are opposed the the protocol which Canada has chosen to accept. Climate change is a serious, global, long-term...
  • Learning Without Dimensions Knowledge Work
    1,365 words
    LEARNING WITHOUT DIMENSIONS In their essay, respectively, The Age of Social Transformation by Drucker and The New Humanities: Readings for the Twenty-First Century, Miller and Spellmeyer outline and discuss on some improvements on the contemporary education. Education in the United States has always been mainly in service by the public. Should or would education still be given by the public or other non-profit organizations is the question the twenty-first century has to decide. In the twentieth...
  • Free Trade Labor Wto Seattle
    3,089 words
    The last time the World Trade Organization had a major meeting, it was in Singapore, and now we know why. Singapore, of course, is the city-state that accords near-perfect freedom to banks and corporations while jailing political activists and caning messy tenants and people who chew gum in public. When WTO ministers gathered in Singapore in 1997, their business was unimpeded by any outside agitators. (Or, for that matter, any internal dissidents: Advocates for worker rights or environmental sta...
  • Problems Of Modernization In Developing Nations
    630 words
    Problems of Modernization in Developing Nations The economic situation which exists in the developing world today, is the result of the relationship between the modern, and developing nations of the world. Modernized nations benefited from this relationship because it gave them access to natural resources. However, because of this relationship, many developing nations now suffer from severe problems. These nations a reattempting to change the situation in which they struggle. A political cartoo...
  • Globalization Developing Nations
    1,157 words
    In my research paper I will address the question, "How does globalization effect the onset and outcome of the revolutionary process" This subject area provides a very fertile area of research for two important reasons. The first is that many of the traditional revolutionary theories tend to focus highly on the "government / rebel " dichotomy. But it is my contention that focus on this distinction prevents a holistic understanding of the way that revolutions occur in modern times. In the current ...
  • Comparison Of Ethiopia And Mali
    1,863 words
    A Brief Overview of the History of Ethiopia Ethiopia is one of the most unique among African countries for maintaining its freedom from colonial rule, with the short exception of an occupation by the Italians from 1936-1941. A socialist state was established in 1974 with the overthrow of Emperor Selassie, who had been in control since 1930. A junta or group of military officers called the Der was responsible for the coup. Yet, this corrupt administration has lead only to warfare and wide scale p...
  • Big Oil's View On Global Warming
    691 words
    Big Oils Proposals Proposal 1 Representatives of major corporations that will be affected by the Kyoto Protocol should play a major role in the procedures: Justification: Many corporations that will be affected by decisions made during the procedures are some of the most powerful decision makers in the world. the policies that these corporations adopt influence the decisions made by governments on a global scale. In fact, many of their annual incomes are larger than the GDPs of some countries. W...
  • Role Of Imf And World Bank
    1,435 words
    Introduction The world's major international financial institutions represent paradoxical ideals in their quest to satisfy the needs of both developed and developing nations. These institutions are chartered with helping poor nations but are criticized for their neo-colonial policies. Member nations are all considered equal, but contributions make some more equal than others. Mostly, these organizations are managed by rich nations that usurp the autonomy of developing nations in the pursuit of f...
  • World Trade Center United States
    1,754 words
    With the beginning of a seemingly endless war on terrorism, and a shaky United States economy, now hardly seems the time to examine our general policy towards all other nations, and developing nations in particular. The wreckage of the World Trade Center is still smoldering, and our troops are marching on Kabul as I write. Nationalism is at a height only previously experienced during the World Wars. Every other car you see on the highway has "Old Glory" proudly flying in their window or on their...
  • Child Labor Children Labour Iqbal
    1,881 words
    Child Labour Child Labour In the past few years, a great deal of attention has been drawn to the global problem of child labour. Virtually everyone is guilty of participating in this abusive practice through the purchase of goods made in across the globe, usually in poor, developing nations. This issue has been around for a great length of time but has come to the forefront recently because of reports that link well known American companies like Wal-Mart and Nike to the exploitation of children....
  • World Bank Urges Lower Trade Barriers
    508 words
    New York Times Date of Article: 04/14/03 Article by: The Associated Press The article states that the World Bank is urging well-off countries to lower their trade barriers. According to the World Bank, global poverty can be cut in half by 2015 if rich countries will lower their trade barriers and also increase foreign aid. The article also speaks of the need for developing countries to invest heavily in education, and that education, coupled with lower trade barriers in developed countries is th...
  • The Development Of A Global University
    616 words
    All nations should help support the development of a global university designed to engage students in the process of solving the world's most persistent social problems The term 'global's ignifies something substantial for the entire world. The need of a global body is uttermost important to solve social problems. The social problems need not be global for their general world significance, but for the threat they pose. The point of view of the speaker can be agreed with since the persiste...