• Volkswagen Heads East Eastern Europe
    1,431 words
    Volkswagen Heads East (or Skoda Heads West) Competition in the global auto industry has become increasingly fierce among the dozen surviving major manufacturers in the early 1990 s. With the dramatic successes of the Japanese leaders (Toyota, Nissan, and Honda), both the North American and European industries have become subject to intense rivalry among U. S. , Japanese, and European automakers. If we look at the Table 1, it shows the positions of major competitors in Western Europe during 1990...
  • Energy For 1999 Quadrillion Btu
    613 words
    Total world carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum, natural gas, and coal, and the flaring of natural gas increased from 5. 873 billion metric tons of carbon equivalent in 1990 to 6. 144 billion metric tons in 1999, or by 4. 6%. (Carbon dioxide emissions are measured in metric tons of carbon equivalent. Tons of carbon equivalent can be converted to tons of carbon dioxide gas by multiplying by 3. 667. One ton of carbon equivalent equals 3. 667 tons of carbon dioxide gas. ) Th...
  • Who Was To Blame For The Cold War
    1,626 words
    Who Was To Blame For The Cold War? The blame for the Cold War cannot be placed on one person -- it developed as a series of chain reactions as a struggle for supremacy. It can be argued that the Cold War was inevitable, and therefore no one's fault, due to the differences in the capitalist and communist ideologies. It was only the need for self-preservation that had caused the two countries to sink their differences temporarily during the Second World War. Yet many of the tensions that existed i...
  • United States Soviet Union Stalin
    966 words
    It is not difficult to lay blame to either the United States or the Soviet Union for the causes of the Cold War; the blame is to be put on the Soviet Union. Joseph Stalin was not looking to do what was best for the economy or the people. His ideas of being a dictator became bigger soon after the end of World War II. He immediately looked to take control over Eastern Europe. His reasons for doing so were not for economic gain but for becoming a major world dictator. There were many differences be...
  • Human Resource Management In Eastern Europe
    3,759 words
    1. INTRODUCTION 2 2. ENVIRONMENT 3 History 3 Political and economical context 4 Educational system 5 Cultural aspects 6 Business environment 7 3. EASTERN EUROPEAN HR PRACTICES 9 Recruitment 9 Compensation 9 4. EU ENLARGEMENT 11 5. AN EASTERN EUROPEAN HRM MODEL 13 6. CONCLUSIONS 15 Ideas for future research 16 7. BIBLIOGRAPHY 17 1. Introduction Many Western firms are rapidly investing in, or forming joint ventures with, firms in Eastern European countries. Despite the growth in Direct Foreign In...
  • Cola Wars Pepsi Coca Market
    1,150 words
    Cola Wars Stephen Brennan Accounting II Tue/Thur. 3-4: 30 The Wall Street Journal recently did an article on how the soft-drink battleground has now turned toward new overseas markets. While once the United States, Australia, Japan, and Western Europe were the dominant soft-drink markets, the growth has slowed down dramatically, but they are still important markets for Coca-Cola and Pepsi. However, Eastern Europe, Mexico, China, Saudi Arabia, and India have become the new 'hot spots.' Both Coca-...
  • Who Was To Blame For The Cold War
    2,893 words
    I GOT AN A STAR AT GCSE LEVEL FOR THIS ESSAY, ENGLISH SPELLING... HOPE U LIKE... Everyones opinion is different, some say one thing, some say another but the big question is, who was to blame for the Cold War The United States of America The Soviet Union Maybe it was inevitable and bound to happen, but maybe it was partly both of their faults. Could the Cold War have been prevented There are many points that can argue and back up all of the above opinions. I will be examining different sources a...
  • Post World War 2 Essay
    3,890 words
    The Cold War Throughout the course of the last decades the world has up until recently been embroiled in a philosophical political war period that has been labeled and known as the Cold War. It was the attempt between the two super powers, USA and U. S. S. R, to gain control of as much power as possibility in order to spread their influence. This undertaking on both sides led to a plethora of crisis, and various wars throughout the world, which were directly causes of their attempt for world sup...
  • Cold War United States
    983 words
    War is normally associated with destruction and death to end a conflict or some sort of disagreement but that is not always the case. After World War II the United States and the Soviet Union began a war that would span decades yet there would be no direct battle between the two nations. This time is called the Cold war because of its lack of battle between just the two nations. Even though it was never the soviets verse the Americans the Soviets often fought the Americans. What could have went ...
  • World War Ii Europe China Asia
    371 words
    World War II or the Second World War was a global conflict that began on 7 July 1937, in Asia and 1 September 1939, in Europe and lasted until 1945, involving the majority of the world's countries and every inhabited continent. Virtually all countries that participated in World War I were involved in World War II. It was the most extensive and expensive apocalyptic armed conflict in the history of the World. Attributed in varying degrees to the Treaty of Versailles, the Great Depression, nationa...
  • Eastern Europe Stalin War Soviet
    2,184 words
    Before we can examine and understand the decisions made at these three conferences and their affects thereafter, we must first understand the situation in Europe as the 2 nd World War was drawing to a close and the intentions and foreign policies of both the Allies and particularly the USSR. When fighting in Europe ended in May 1945, the USSR occupied most of Eastern Europe, including: the Baltic States, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and the eastern portion of Germany. The Big Three, which inc...
  • Islam 2 North Africa
    629 words
    The Diffusion of the Islam in North Africa/Southwest Asia The North Africa/Southwest Asia realm has spread itself from the Atlantic shores of Morocco to the mountains of Afghanistan. Sometimes this part of the world is referred to as the Arab world. This realm is one the richest in the world of historical and cultural point of view. It has been the origin of three of four religions; Christianity, Islam and Judaism. The Islam is the major religion in the 'Arab World', but along with it Christiani...
  • Eastern Europe Unification Gdr Germany
    1,697 words
    Which Major Domestic And International Factors Made German Unification Possible There were four major groups which played a large role in the unification of Germany in 1990 and whose actions made this unification a possibility. The first of these was the Soviet Union. and in particular President Gorbachev, whose actions in the USSR set the scene for the end of the Cold War and made reunification a possibility. Second, the SED, the communist government in the GDR, which essentially failed to reac...
  • Europe S Renaissance Versus Asian Meltdown
    1,613 words
    Europe s Renaissance Versus Asian Meltdown The origins of Asian Problems Major setbacks in Asia occurred after remarkable success-stories of many countries in the region. Average annual GDP growth came close to 10% per year for 30 consecutive years for the Asian Tiger economies. During the last decade their share in the world exports has grown to 20% of the total, in 1996 they bought about 19% of the US exports and they received a half of total capital inflows to developing countries. Over a dec...
  • Problems Resulting From The Fall Of Communism
    848 words
    The collapse of communism in Eastern Europe and in The Soviet Union has presented an array of new opportunities but also problems for much of this region. Although, with this collapse the opportunity arises to establish a democratic government and a market economy exists, the process has shown to be a slow one. With the attempt to restore civil liberties and the hope of enjoying the standard of living similar to that of Western Europe, communist parties are still in existence (under new names an...
  • End Of Soviet Domination
    1,227 words
    1. Describe and analyze three reasons for the end of soviet domination over Eastern Europe. On New Year's Eve, 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialists Republics was dissolved, sixty-nine years after its founding. By the end of October 1990, all fifteen Soviet republics had already declared their sovereignty. The fall of communism can ironically be described as the "domino theory." Starting with Mikhail Gorbachev's effort to transform soviet society, non-communist governments spread from Poland and ...
  • The Causes Of The Cold War
    833 words
    Many young historians ask themselves how did the Cold War start? I for one am wondering. But, I suppose the answer to that is quite simple, not straight foreword, but simple. The steps leading up to the Cold War are not as quite as chronological as they were in WWII, when Hitler broke the Treaty Of Versailles, however, the pieces of the puzzle do fit together, and they do make a complete picture. In 1943 and 1945 two conferences were held between President Roosevelt of USA, Prime Minister Church...
  • The Cold War Eastern Europe
    1,278 words
    During the post-war years of 1945-1949, the USSR adopted a policy of "sovietization" and set about its expansion into Eastern Europe, by creating Moscow-friendly satellite states. The USSR saw this as a purely defensive action, while the West saw this as evidence of Russia's expansionist nature. Hence, Soviet Union's move into Eastern Europe was much cause of the conflict between the West and Russia. One of the motivating forces behind Stalin's expansionist policy into Europe was that of oversea...
  • Nato Expansion And The Future Of European Security
    1,368 words
    A more assertive Foreign Minister and a more nationalist Duma are now in power in Moscow. Both face serious challenges in pursuit of two principal foreign policy goals articulated by the new Foreign Minister, Yevgeny Primakov: Defending Russia's national interests and developing ties with the United States. One of Russia's primary challenges comes from Washington's drive to expand NATO into Eastern Europe. With good reason, Moscow strongly opposes expansion of the Atlantic alliance. In principle...
  • Eastern Europe Stalin Soviet War
    439 words
    The Soviet Union had fought alongside America and Britain, to defeat Nazi Germany, Italy and Japan in the Second World War. At the end of the war, devastation was wide-spread. The Soviet Union was terribly affected by war, ruined by war. Total Soviet casualties doubled those of any other nation. Millions were homeless, without husbands, without an economy to get them back on their feet. Now that the war had ceased, the USSR and United States had no reason to co-operate as they had previously. I...