• Generational Conflict Peter Charlene Language
    1,259 words
    "Bringing Down the House" featuring Steve Martin and Queen Latifah is a clever comedy that creatively showcases the sociolinguistic phenomena covered in this course. The film is about a tax attorney named Peter, played by Martin, who stumbles into an online lawyer chat room and meets Charlene, played by Latifah. The two chat frequently, mostly about court cases, and eventually decide to meet in person. When the day finally comes, Peter is greeted at the door with who he thought would be a middle...
  • Ebonics Standard English
    824 words
    EBONICS Ebonics, also known as Black English, is a nonstandard dialect spoken in many homes in the inner cities of America. This nonstandard language is often looked upon as low-class or lazy talk. This is not the case, however. Due to consistencies found in the dialect, there seems to be an order. It has been found that, when learning English, African-Americans adapted the language using some of the structure and rules of their own native tongue. This Black English has carried on through slaver...
  • Oppressive Force Standard English
    955 words
    "Oppressive Forces " Amy Tan's "Mother Tongue" and James Baldwin's "If Black English Isn't a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is?" discusses the power in language and how it is defined as a tool for communication but is used to shape people's perception of others. Both Tan and Baldwin state that language is used as an oppressive force that doesn't properly acknowledge minorities and the lack of proficiency in "standard" English doesn't allow them to participate with society equally. Within Baldwin's...
  • Ebonics African American
    3,063 words
    Ebonics The United States is filled with many different ethnicities, cultures, customs, languages, etc. Supposedly, our public schools are equipped with classes, teachers, curriculums and materials in order to educate that part of the student population whose first language is something other than the English language. Bilingual classes, transitional classes, ESL classes are just a few of the programs that have been developed to instruct non-English speaking students in order for them to acquire...
  • Ebonics Black English
    1,232 words
    Ebonics, or Black English, was recently a controversial topic in the United States, when the Oakland School District school board attempted to classify ebonics as a completely different language from Standard American English (SAE). There was further controversy when the school board stated that ebonics was genetic. This report will explain Ebonics and its origin, as well as the Oakland school board case. There are over 20 million blacks in the United States today. It is hard to tell exactly how...
  • Jordan's Jargon Standard English
    1,509 words
    June Jordan is a profound writer and spokesperson for Black Americans. Her views on the dialect called Black English, however, are quite arrogant and egotistical. Granted, the acknowledgment of other dialects in the United States is beneficial. Her views that it should be taught as separate English and possibly recognized as another standard English language, is far too impractical and selfish. Much like white teenagers have their own jargon, Black English is just another informal way of communi...
  • Ebonics In Schools African American
    1,106 words
    Ebonics in Schools Many black individuals have played their part in America's history. Hast he Oakland School gone too far by wanting to teach a black slang language in school. In this paper, you will see the peoples, teachers, and the student " so pinion as well as the Senate. A lot of people are speaking out on the subject, especially actors. Arsenic Hall replied to reporters "When I heard somebody from Oakland say the word genetic, on TV, I ran into the kitchen so I didn't have to be mad at a...
  • Standardization Of The English Language
    1,783 words
    Standardization of the English Language There are several important events before 1500 that when listed together show a series of steps in the struggle for English language supremacy. These steps are mainly governmental, legal and official events that pushed English usage. In 1356 The Sheriff's Court in London and Middlesex were conducted in English for the first time. When Parliament opened in 1362 the Statute of Pleading was issued declaring English as a language of the courts as well as of Pa...
  • Standard English United States
    1,391 words
    Jessica Green 3-1-99 English 1 A-04 Essay #2 Final Draft I myself have never used my language to really shape my identity. I was born in the United States and English is the national language. Call me ignorant or selfish but I believe if you come here you should learn English. I do not care if you speak your language at home or with friends, but if you expect everyone to cater to you, you must be crazy. You knew the national language when you arrived. The United States provides bilingual classe...
  • Black English Language African Slaves
    1,574 words
    The history of Black English in the United States is complex and even today only partly understood. Black English is also referred to as Black language, African American Vernacular English, Black English Vernacular or Vernacular Black English, Ebonics, African American English, "the language of soul," and "the shuffling speech of slavery." There has been much controversy over the history of Black English and how it came about. Many linguists trace the development of Black English back to the tim...
  • Standard English Language Ideology People
    2,456 words
    With the fast-paced globalization and technological development, the world is stepping into the era of informational ism. It is characterized by the advances in computing technology and the global network of telecommunications, in which English is! SS selected!" as the lingua franca (common communicative language). Subsequently, the demand for learning English as the second language (ESL) or the foreign language (EFL) keeps growing into the past few decades. English is turning to an internationa...
  • The Who What And Where Of Standard English
    668 words
    The Who, What, and How of Standard English What is Standard English? It is the variety of English that is generally acknowledged as the model for the speech and writing of educated speakers. People who speak Standard English are often understood by people who speak different dialects. In recent years, however, the term has more often been used to distinguish the speech and writing of middle-class educated speakers' from the speech of other groups who use non-standard English. One example ...