• Years War Religion Church Catholic
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    Ever since the dawn of the 16 th Century, much of the European countries were controlled or greatly affected by reining religions. Throughout much of history, the dominating Roman Catholic Church was the major cause of battles and wars. This was especially a causing factor of the Thirty-Years War in Western Europe. Many rulers used religion as an excuse to disturb the peace and take control of another country. During those times, religions were used as force. Whenever the Emperor or Empress of a...
  • The Hundred Years' War
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    The Hundred Years War was a long, complicated war with its roots in political struggles, the want of Kings and the people of their nations to expand territory, and to take territory that they believe is theirs. This war lasted more than a century, from 1337-1453, and was a actually a series of wars broken only temporarily by treaties doomed to fail. The English king controlled much of France, particularly in the fertile South. These lands had come under control of the English when Eleanor of Aqu...
  • Japan Years War
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    In the year 710, the first permanent Japanese capital was established in Nara, a city modelled after the Chinese capital. Large Buddhist monasteries were built in the new capital. The monasteries quickly gained such strong political influence that, in order to protect the position of the emperor and central government, the capital was moved to Naga oka in 784, and finally to Heian (Kyoto) in 794 where it should remain for over one thousand years. One characteristic of the Nara and Heian periods ...
  • Mother Courage War People Play
    1,606 words
    MOTHER COURAGE The education system has always tried to figure out new ways of teaching certain matters of interest, like history, where there are many points to be discuss that can be left out by authors. Text books do not fill everything that should be filled, and it is impossible to do so because there are too many things to tell and not enough space to write. There is also the fact that every professor wants to give his or her own approach to the topic, and sometimes there is not one source ...
  • Consequences Of The 30 Years War
    647 words
    Consequences of the 30 Years War- Essay From the change of warfare, to the vast changes in government and dominance, the Thirty Years War had clearly resulted in many changes and effected many areas of life. These changes occur politically, religiously, socially and economically. As the most destructive event in German history, the Thirty Years War started as a conflict between the Protestants and Roman Catholics, yet ended up as a fight for political power. The war was divided up into 4 phases,...
  • The Thirty Years' War
    795 words
    The Thirty Years' War THE HAPSBURG S DEMISE On October 24, 1648 in Munster a treaty was signed that ended one of the most bloody wars in European history. This war, a war of religion, involved most of Western Europe, especially the Holy Roman Empire. The Thirty Years War marked the decline socially, politically, and economically of the Hapsburgs and the rise of France as the chief power in Europe. As a result of the Thirty Years War, the Hapsburgs lost their standing as the wealthiest dynasty in...
  • Seven Years War Britain Colonies Colonists
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    The Seven Years War proved to be a crossroads in the history of British colonial rule in America. Britain was victorious, but after defeating her French foes (along with their Indian allies), Britain was left to contemplate the ramifications of a war that would leave her relationship with her American colonies altered forever. This change would eventually lead to conflict between the colonies and Britain, and ultimately the Declaration of American Independence. In order to understand how the rel...
  • Thirty Years War Ferdinand Germany Catholic
    4,927 words
    Philip, Spanish kings. Philip I (the Handsome), 1478-1506, king of Castile (1506), was the son of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I and Mary of Burgundy. He inherited Burgundy and the Low Countries from his mother and was titular joint ruler of Castile with his wife, Joanna. But her father ruled these lands as his regent, so he contested (1504) Ferdinand's regency and assumed (1506) joint rule of Castile with his wife. Philip's early death, however, and his wife's deteriorating mental condition al...
  • Henry Iv Hundred Years
    2,132 words
    Book Review: Henry V William Shakespeare was born on April 23, 1546. He was the third child to Mary and John Shakespeare and lived in the small, provincial town of Stratford-upon-Avon. He most likely attended the King's New School, of which usually employed Oxford graduates and was generally well respect. After petty school, modern day pre-school, Shakespeare was moved to a higher level of learning in Grammar School. Here his literary foundation was set in motion as he studied the great artists ...
  • The Seven Years War
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    The Seven Years War " Pluto t mou rir que faillir' ('Rather dying than failing') and "UBIQUE! QUO FAS ET GLORIA DUCUNT' "Everywhere! Where Right and Glory Lead." The Seven Years war, or the French and Indian war to Americans, was arguably the first true world. The Seven years war was a worldwide war fought in Europe, North America, and India between. It was France, Austria, Russia, Saxony, Sweden, and (after 1762) Spain on the one side and Prussia, Great Britain, and Hanover on the other (the Am...
  • Voltaires Candide Seven Years
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    Voltaire's most classic work, Candide, is a satiric assault on most everything that was prevalent in society during the author's lifetime. The entire novel can be regarded as a bleak story where every character compares life stories to see whose life is worse. Just when the novel cannot get anymore morbid or depressing, it does, to a much greater degree. While Candide is generally considered a universal denunciation, it is optimism that Voltaire is attacking to the greatest degree. However, the...
  • The Development Of The Cannon And Gun Powder
    682 words
    The developments of gunpowder and the cannon were the most important advances during the Middle Ages. If it weren't for these inventions, who knows how we would be fighting today, possibly still the wars of Ancient Rome. The development of gunpowder meant that soon the use of knights would be useless because of the projectile that could easily knock a knight off his horse, rendering him helpless. The gunpowder enabled this projectile. The development of the cannon goes hand-in-hand with the gunp...
  • Edward's War Front Line
    2,433 words
    King Edward III's military tactics were the sole reason for the English victory at Crecy in 1346. Not only that, he was the reason for English success overall in the early stages of The Hundred Years War. The war was started because of a feudal dynastic struggle over the Duchy of Aquitaine, and also the French throne. The first major battle was dominated by Edward, it took place at Sluys in 1340. It was a naval battle, that despite his inexperience as an admiral, Edward took the reigns and led h...
  • Brecht De Pizan Similar Views Different Methods
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    Bert olt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children and Christine de Pizan's Deeds of Arms and of Chivalry are associated in relation to European war history. Both authors' writings reflect similar ideas that war is righteous and honorable. They also recognize its financial importance in their societies, and don't see reason for the war to cease. However Brecht touched on the more negative aspects such as famine through concentrating on civilian life, while de Pizan focuses on more optimistic view...
  • Decline Of The Middle Ages
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    One of humanity's darkest hours, the decline of the middle ages was a truly horrific time in history. Such a lamented time, though, was not brought to its worst point overnight. Several factors, the most prominent being the bubonic plague, actually combined to bring mankind to an all time low. During the middle ages, religion played a major role in the lives of everyday people. The last book of the bible, the book of Revelation, prompted multitudes of people to believe the world was coming to an...
  • Brief Overview Of The Hundred Years War
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    How long did the Hundred Years War last? The answer is actually a surprising 116 years. The Hundred Years war is the name given to the series of on and off warfare fought between the kings of England and France, from 1337 to 1453. The war consisted of sieges, raids, sea and land battles, and long periods truce ("Hundred Years War", 222). The war shaped the way the time period ended and the way western Europe looks today. The events of the Hundred Years War created a framework for the way we look...
  • 30 Years War Kavita 30
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    Kavita Ma kadi European History: Thirty Years War The Thirty Years War is said to be "the last and most destructive of the wars of religion.' (Kagan. The Western Heritage. Pg. 408) There were many occurrences in the years preceding the war that unavoidably caused the fighting. There was conflict between the Catholics and the Protestants and the Calvinists and the Lutherans, who all believed in sacrificing for their religious beliefs and expansion of their political control. This caused strife be...