• Because I Could Not Stop For Death
    943 words
    Emily Dickinson's two poems, 'Because I Could Not Stop For Death' and 'I Heard A Fly Buzz-When I Died,' revolve around one central theme, death. Though the two do centralize around the theme of death they both have slightly different messages or beliefs about what is to come after death. By discussing both of the poems and interpreting their meanings, the reader can gain a fuller understanding of the message Dickinson is trying to send to her audience and a greater feel for what may lie ahead in...
  • Intellectual Beauty Power Stanza Shelley
    1,214 words
    In Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, Shelley describes his realisation of the power of human intellect. In seven carefully-constructed stanzas, he outlines the qualities of this power and the e ect it has had on him, using the essential themes of Romantic poetry with references to nature and the self. In the first stanza, the concept of the unseen Power the mind is put forward, and Shelley states his position on the subject. Throughout the stanza, extensive use is made of profluent similes. As summe...
  • Abab Format Poem Stanza Person
    967 words
    This poem was very hard to make an argument for to tell what it means. The poem deals with the idea of depression, hurt, weighted choices, and death. It is the most uplifting of poems, but I don t think Emily Dickinson was trying to make it that way. She uses the idea of winter to represent darkness, the comparison of the weight of a choice the heft of Cathedral tunes. She uses a line, which states that there are internal differences to represent emotional not physical problems. She also say s ...
  • African American Dunbar Americans Stanza
    1,213 words
    Throughout African American history, African Americans have used poems as a way of describing the African American condition in America. One poet who was widely known for using poetry to describe the condition of African Americans in America was Paul Laurence Dunbar. Paul Laurence Dunbar was one of the most prolific poets of his time. Paul Laurence Dunbar used vivid, descriptive and symbolic language to portray images in his poetry of the senseless prejudices and racism that African Americans fa...
  • Explanation Of The Poem From Snowbound
    431 words
    Explanation of the poem from Snowbound The main theme of Snowbound is that no-matter what happens, family will be there to help and comfort. This theme is demonstrated widely throughout the poem and even more so in the last stanza of this excerpt. Another, less prominent, theme of Snowbound is the meaning and involvement of God in the lives of people. The first stanza describes the moment before the storm. "A chill no coat, however stout, Of homespun stuff could quite shut out," This stanza begi...
  • To His Coy Mistress By Andrew Marvell
    1,142 words
    In 'To His Coy Mistress,' Andrew Marvell presents a speaker who appeals to his love through persuasion. The speaker uses an appeal to reason as his main tool, but he also appeals to his mistress through emotion and character to garner a response. Each stanza utilizes a different method of appeal that relies on diction and punctuation. In the first stanza, the speaker appeals to character, in the second emotion, and in the third reason. By using different methods of appeal, the speaker hopes to w...
  • Eleanor Rigby Stanza Father Loneliness
    390 words
    Eleanor Rigby Loneliness is a reoccurring theme in all types of literature. 'Eleanor Rigby,' ; by John Lennon and Paul McCartney is a fine example of the theme of loneliness in poetry. The two characters in 'Eleanor Rigby'; are compared by their loneliness through the extensive use of symbols. The poem begins with the refrain, 'Ah, look at all the lonely people.' ; The same refrain is used to end the poem, making a complete circle. This creates, for the reader, a sense of loneliness about the po...
  • The Stolen Child Three Stanza
    815 words
    The Stolen Child "The Stolen Child", a poem by W. B. Yeats, can be analyzed on several levels. The poem is about a group of faeries that lure a child away from his home "to the waters and the wild" (chorus). On a more primary level the reader can see connections made between the fairy world and freedom as well as a societal return to innocence. On a deeper and second level the reader can infer Yeats' desire to see a unified Ireland of simpler times. The poem uses vivid imagery to establish both...
  • Hymn To Intellectual Beauty
    1,206 words
    In "Hymn to Intellectual Beauty", Shelley describes his realisation of the power of human intellect. In seven carefully-constructed stanzas, he outlines the qualities of this power and the e ect it has had on him, using the essential themes of Romantic poetry with references to nature and the self. In the first stanza, the concept of the "unseen Power" the mind is put forward, and Shelley states his position on the subject. Throughout the stanza, extensive use is made of profluent similes. "As ...
  • Third Stanza Life Imagery Autumn
    1,681 words
    Life is a beautiful thing that should not be wasted. Life must be lived without warning; it is not to be taken for granted. We will never fully understand life, not even in a million years. The theme of John Keats' "To Autumn" is to enjoy life, even as you grow old and it begins to move away from you. He spreads his message through the time frame, imagery, and diction of the stanzas. To begin with, the time frame of the stanzas begins to prove the theme. By itself, it doesn't prove the theme, b...
  • Gods Grandeur Second Stanza
    548 words
    Gerard Nan ley Hopkins' poem "God's Grandeur", illustrates the relationship connecting man and God. Hopkins uses alliteration and stern tone to compliment the religious content of this morally ambitious poem. The poem's rhythm and flow seem to capture the same sensation of a church sermon. The diction used by Hopkins seems to indicate a condescending attitude towards society. The first stanza states that we are "charged with the grandeur of God", or the direct quality of God's being. This statem...
  • First Stanza War Father One
    341 words
    Diane Thiel's poem "The Minefield" is about a man who's mind has been ravaged by memories of a war in his childhood. She shows that even though the war had been over for years, the memory of it haunted the man in everything that he did. Through a powerful combination of symbols, dark images, and a split chronology, she creates a full picture of a life changed forever by war. In the first stanza, the tone is lighter, describing a scene where two boys are running through towns. The boys race, the...
  • Road Not Taken Yellow Wood
    413 words
    The Road Not Taken - Frost Critical Analysis.' The Road Not Taken', written by Robert Lee Frost, is a poem that has four five-line stanzas with only two end rhymes in each stanza (aba ab). Several kinds of literary devices can be found in the poem. One of the literary devices employed is antithesis. The first stanza of the poem describes a traveller comes to a split in a road through a 'yellow wood' and wishes he could 'travel both' routes, but at the same time he realizes that the thought of tr...
  • Third Stanza Poem Wine Cup
    1,448 words
    2/13/97 The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam presents an interesting challenge to any reader trying to sort through its heavy symbolism and not-so-obvious theme. Not only does the poem provide us with a compelling surface story, but a second look at the text can reveal a rich collection of seperate meanings hidden in the poem's objective descriptions and sprawling narrative-which in the space of a few pages includes such disparate characters as the Moon, God, the Snake (and his traditional Christian nei...
  • The Bells Words Stanza Poem
    384 words
    The Bells by Edgar Allan Poe The Bells is one of Poe's famous poems, in which Poe tries to make the bells sound real. He tries to make the sounds by using words instead of sound, which is really annoying when you read it, because he repeats things so often in the poem. He uses words like shrieking and twinkling. In every stanza he talks about different bells, and what noises they make, and for what occasion they are for. In the first stanza he talks about sleigh bells and Christmas bells. In thi...
  • One Art By Elizabeth Bishop
    428 words
    In the poem "One Art," Elizabeth Bishop expresses two different views on the "art of losing." Bishop's first view on loss is that loss is an everyday occurrence, something to "accept." Her second view is that a loss can affect someone very deeply. Bishop utilizes verse form and language to fully develop these two different view points. In the first five stanzas of the poem, Bishop's view of loss is whimsical. In the first stanza Bishop states that "many things seem filled with the intent to be l...
  • Critical Analysis Of Poem 189 By Emily Dickinson
    280 words
    In poem # 199 Emily Dickinson presents a very intricate approach towards marriage. In the first stanza she writes "I'm 'wife' - I've finished that / I'm 'Woman' now - It's safer so," what she means here is that now since I am married, I have become complete woman. I think the message that she is trying to convey is that every girl ought to get married in order for her to become a 'complete' woman. In the first 3 line Dickinson seems to present a pro-marriage opinion. But in the last line of stan...
  • Americanized Child Stanza Mother
    737 words
    Americanized Walkthrough Bruce Dawe is strongly opposed to consumerism, as shown through his poem, Americanized. The poem is written in a predominantly bitter and ironic tone. The title itself is ironic. Bruce Dawe is Australian and has spelled the title using American spelling rather than Australian spelling, with the 's? being replaced by a 'z? Stanza one is set in the morning at breakfast time. It involves the mother and her child. Instead of the usual loving mother, we see a cold mother and ...
  • John Keats's Ode On A Grecian Urn Critical Analysis
    660 words
    The physical object in John Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn" written in 1819 is the Greek vase or urn. The voice of the speaker in this ode is extenuated as he unifies himself to the urn to indicate the idea of eternity. The tone of the ode starts out to be light and flowery with image ries of the supernatural. However, when looking into the deeper meaning, the tone is actually quite morbid. During this time, Keats's health was failing. The idea of death is reflected in this work. He discusses th...
  • Time Lost Virgins Stanza
    233 words
    An Explication Of To The Virgins, ToAn Explication Of To The Virgins, To Make Much Of Time The title To the Virgins, to Make much of time, gives a hint as to the meaning of the work. We gleam from the title that Time is going to be significant. However, we cannot know what the context of time is without the benefit of reading further. We also learn that Virgins plays an integral part of this work. Somehow the two become connected and reflect innocence and time. The thoughts of time going quickly...