• Emily Dickinson Heard A Fly
    569 words
    Emily Dickinson Many poets often have themes or topics for which most of their poetry falls under. One of the topics that frequent the writhing of Emily Dickinson is death. This is the case with I Felt a Funeral in my Brain, and I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died. In I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died the we receive the image of death by the description in the first stanza, the stillness round my form was like the stillness in the air between the heaves of storm. This stillness, like the stillness in th...
  • The Red Wheelbarrow Poem Images Stanza
    369 words
    William Carlos Williams was an imagist poet; he wanted to revision poetry in America. His whole theme dealer with visions and images. He opposed general statements and abstract ideas. His poem "The Red Wheelbarrow" was filled with images and ideas that made the poem so easy to visualize. I believe that this poem is about perfection. The second and third stanza's, "a red wheel/ barrow/ glazed with rain/ water," provides us with the idea that it has a sufficient amount of water in which to farm. ...
  • Analysis Of 13 Ways Of Looking At A Blackbird
    572 words
    Analysis of '13 Ways of Looking at a Blackbird' "Thirteen ways of looking at a blackbird" by Wallace Stevens is a poem about what it means to really know something. In this poem, Stevens shows this connection by writing a first person poem about a poet's observation and contemplation's when viewing a blackbird. He does this by making each stanza an explanation of a new way he has perceived this blackbird. First, he writes about his physical perception of the blackbird as an observer. Then, he wr...
  • A Little Girl Lost
    1,378 words
    June 10, 1998 Critical Prose Paper A Little GIRL Lost Children of the future Age, Reading this indignant page; Know that in a former time, Love! Sweet Love! Was thought a crime. In the Age of Gold, Tired with kisses sweet Free from winters cold: They agree to meet, Youth and maiden bright, When the silent sleep To the holy light, Waves o er heavens deep; Naked in the sunny beams And the weary tired wanderers delight. Weep. Once a youthful pair To her father white Fill d with softest care: Came t...
  • Taylor Poem Elect Stanza
    358 words
    The fly is caught in the web, along with a wasp. The fly's struggles simply transmit its location to the spider, who quickly overpowers and destroys the hopeless victim. The fly represents everyone who is not a wasp; the non-believer, the misled Christian, the Catholic, or the savage. Powerless against the devil, these creatures quickly fall prey without hope of rescue. Taylor shows that the wasp is a threat to the spider, while the fly is easier to trap and seize. The devil, which is the spider...
  • Vocabulary And Allusions In Stanza Bird Poet Nightingale
    2,380 words
    Charles Brown, a friend with whom Keats was living when he composed this poem, wrote, In the spring of 1819 a nightingale had built her nest near my house. Keats felt a tranquil and continual joy in her song; and one morning he took his chair from the breakfast table to the grass-plot under a plum-tree, where he sat for two or three hours. When he came into the house, I perceived he had some scraps of paper in his hand, and these he was quietly thrusting behind the books. On inquiry, I found tho...
  • Hymn To Intellectual Beauty
    1,216 words
    In 'Hymn to Intellectual Beauty', Shelley describes his realisation of the power of human intellect. In seven carefully-constructed stanzas, he outlines the qualities of this power and the e eat it has had on him, using the essential themes of Romantic poetry with references to nature and the self. In the first stanza, the concept of the 'unseen Power' - the mind - is put forward, and Shelley states his position on the subject. Throughout the stanza, extensive use is made of profluent similes. ...
  • Poem Third Stanza
    654 words
    The poem consists of three stanzas and it is formed on quatrains. In the first stanza the black man talks about the fear that he would not have a good harvest because the wind or birds could take the seed away. Actually the action of "planting" is metaphorical and means that this black man has fears for the future, which seems disappointing to him. That is he "plants" his labor for a better future. In the second stanza the man says that even though he had enough seeds planted in rows from Canad...
  • Second Line Alliteration Stanza First
    1,324 words
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850) I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance The waves beside them danced; but th...
  • Ballad Of Birmingham Mother Hunter Child
    1,104 words
    Ballad of Birmingham In the poem Ballad of Birmingham, by Dudley Randall, written in 1969, Mr. Randall uses of irony to describes the events of the mothers decision, and also her concern for the welfare of her darling little child. It seems odd that this child would even know what a freedom march is, but this would be considered normal back in the early 1960's, when Mr. Martin Luther King Jr. had rallies and freedom marches to free the African American people from discrimination and segregation ...
  • Stanza Cadaver Dissected Verse
    328 words
    "Carnal Knowledge" Assignment Stanza 1:" You, young, whistled again, entered King's, climbed the stone-murky steps to the high and brilliant Dissecting Room where nameless others, naked on the slabs," These lines remind me of how scary and lifeless the operating room can feel. I know this verse is about the cadaver being dissected, but the ultimate purpose of practicing here is also preparation for surgery. I've never actually been a patient in an OR, but I've been in one countless number of tim...
  • Because I Could Not Stop For Death
    862 words
    In Emily Dickinson Because I could not stop for Death (448), the speaker of the poem is a woman who relates about a situation after her death. The speaker personifies death as a polite and considerate gentleman who takes her in a carriage for a romantic journey; however, at the end of this poem, she finishes her expedition realizing that she has died many years ago. The poem contains six quatrains, and does not follow any consistent rhyme scheme. Every line starts with a strong beat and ends up ...
  • Fall Season Autumn Change Poem
    406 words
    "To Autumn" The theme of John Keats' poem, "To Autumn", is that change is both natural and beautiful. The speaker in the poem acknowledges that time passes by, but also asserts that this change usually yields something new and better than what came before. The poem praises the glories of the fall season by using almost every type of imagery to both charm and appeal to the reader. Each of the poem's three stanzas represents the evolving of two different types of change. One type of change shown i...
  • Mid Term Break Time Reader Heaney
    462 words
    "Mid Term Break" by Seamus Heaney is set in Ulster during the 1950's. This is a poem which catches the reader's attention by using language in unusual ways. The poem is about the lying to rest of a 4 year old boy, told from his brother's perspective which is the poet. Time is a central point through-out the poem. In stanza two, Heaney says: "I sat all morning... ." This makes you, the reader, think how long and boring that morning must have been. The before you know it, it's two o'clock and thi...
  • A Comparison And Contrast Of Nature
    1,219 words
    A Comparison and Contrast of Nature BY: Professor Liber man 4-02-99 In the Nineteenth century Realism, Naturalism, and Symbolism were popular modes of expression by writers of that era. Such modes of expression were the use of nature in their writings. Two poets that really stand out among the rest are Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) and Paul Verlaine (1844-1896). Baudelaire was referred to by many as the "first Modern Poet' and the "father of modern criticism'. Verlaine like Baudelaire was a sym...
  • Intellectual Beauty Power Stanza Shelley
    1,234 words
    A Critique And Summary Of Percy Bys sheA Critique And Summary Of Percy Bys she Shelley's Hymn To Intellectual Beauty In Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, Shelley describes his realisation of the power of human intellect. In seven carefully-constructed stanzas, he outlines the qualities of this power and the e ect it has had on him, using the essential themes of Romantic poetry with references to nature and the self. In the first stanza, the concept of the unseen Power the mind is put forward, and She...
  • A Red Rose Aa
    716 words
    A Red, Red Rose A Red, Red Rose is a poem written by Robert Burns, during 1796, the year of his death. The poem consists of four stanzas; each one four lines long. The first stanza has an exact rhyme at the end of the second and fourth lines — June and tune. The repetition of "O, my luve' in the first stanza conjures up the idea that his love is different from other men. His woman is so special to him that she reminds him of a red, red rose, not just a "plain' red rose. He uses two differe...
  • Dorothy Parker Reader Poem First
    893 words
    In her poem One Perfect Rose, Dorothy Parker misleads the reader throughout the first and second stanzas into believing this poem is a romantic tribute to a tender moment from her past through her word choice and style of writing. However, the tone of the entire poem dramatically changes upon reading the third and final stanza when Parker allows the reader to understand her true intention of the poem, which is a cynical and perhaps bewildered view of the memory. And, with this shift in the tone ...
  • Song Of Autumn Baudelaire Verlaine Stanza
    1,204 words
    Realism, Naturalism, and Symbolism were popular modes of expression by writers of that era. Such modes of expression were the use of nature in their writings. Two poets that really stand out among the rest are Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) and Paul Verlaine (1844-1896). Baudelaire was referred to by many as the "first Modern Poet" and the "father of modern criticism." Verlaine like Baudelaire was a symbolist poet, he was also French and referred to as the "Prince of Poets." Both these poets tou...
  • Because I Could Not Stop For Death
    873 words
    In Emily Dickinson? s? Because I could not stop for Death? (448), the speaker of the poem is a woman who relates about a situation after her death. The speaker personifies death as a polite and considerate gentleman who takes her in a carriage for a romantic journey; however, at the end of this poem, she finishes her expedition realizing that she has died many years ago. The poem contains six quatrains, and does not follow any consistent rhyme scheme. Every line starts with a strong beat and end...