• Hockey Night In Canada
    298 words
    Over the past few decades, the Canadian sport of hockey slowly moved on to the United States and Europe. Only six teams remain in Canada and most of them are either just making enough money to survive or they are in dept. Only two or three Canadian teams are doing ok, fiscally that is. The NHL should try to bring hockey back to its former 'glory' days. Currently there are 27 teams in the NHL, which is way too many. Either 5 or 6 teams get all the talent or the talented players are spread so thin...
  • First Nation People And Justice In Canada
    1,835 words
    First Nation rights in North America have a history of being overlooked and exploited. The first law that exploited Native people in North America was the Royal Proclamation of 1763, which was designed by the British Crown to take the sovereignty and lands away from the First Nation peoples. This law knowingly violated two of the prevailing European principles of international justice. The Crown was setting itself up as the exclusive real estate agent for the vast First Nation lands in North Ame...
  • National Identity Canada Canadian One
    601 words
    How do others see Canadians, do Canadians have a unique national identity Although the United States (US) has some influence on most countries, Canadian life revolves around the US, and sometimes, how much we hate Americans. Most countries cannot say that they are made up of two separate nations (English and French), Canada, on the other hand, can say this. Another thing about Canada is its unique geography, the fact that it shares the longest border with the US, and Canada has the longest coast...
  • Bill Of Rights Canadian Charter American
    1,406 words
    BACKGROUND OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS The United States Bill of Rights came into being as a result of a promise made by the Fathers of Confederation to the states during the struggle for ratification of the Constitution in 1787-88. A great number of the states made as a condition for their ratification, the addition of amendments, which would guarantee citizens protection of their rights against the central government. Thus, we have a rather interesting situation in which the entrenchment of a bill o...
  • Indo Canadians Gang Canadian Violence
    1,439 words
    Canada is referred to as a multicultural country because it openly accepts new immigrants from around the world (Gabor, 1994; Nodwell and Guppy, 1992). It has been documented that approximately 11. 2% of Canada's total population identify themselves as visible minorities (Varma-Joshi, Baker, and Tanaka, 2004; Fantino and Colak, 2001). Starting a life in a new country not only brings happiness, but also anxiety and a fear of losing one's identity. Often feelings of being an outsider act as a cata...
  • Canadian And French Relations In The Past 100 Years
    1,971 words
    Throughout the ages, many colonies of earlier empires have arisen from their colonial status to become their own country. For many of these, such as the United States, French Indochina and many African nations, their was a common culture which served as a base for uniting their population. In Canada however, their were two very different cultures present, the French and the English. These two peoples had originally had many battles to see who would hold dominance over the colony, and now they ha...
  • Canada The Place You Want To Be
    471 words
    Historically, Canada has been a haven for people looking for a peaceful economically sound country to call home, but at no time in history has Canada been more inviting and accommodating to immigrants than now. The Canadian government is hoping to attract between 200, 00 and 225, 000 new immigrants during the year 2000. And why should Canada not succeed? According to the Human Development Report for 1999 recently released by the United Nations, Canada once again ranks first worldwide among place...
  • Japanesse Internment Camps Japanese Canadian
    1,068 words
    The following summary of the experiences of the Canadian Nikkei comes from the book, A Dream Of Riches, 1978, The Japanese Canadian Centennial Project, Gilchrist Wright Publishers, Toronto, Canada. Written in English, French and Japanese it provides an insight into the experiences of Japanese immigrants and their children in Canada. Since the book may not be widely available outside of Canada, I have taken the liberty of quoting and paraphrasing liberally to present an overview of the Canadian N...
  • Canada Canadian Business
    2,459 words
    Investing In Canada Investing In Canada - Factors that are attractive for direct investment in Canada. Canada is the second largest country in the world, occupying close to 10 million square kilometres of land bounded by the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans. Canada shares a 6, 000 kilometre border and the five largest freshwater lakes in the world with the United States. Known as the Great Lakes, they provide a route to the Atlantic via the St. - Lawrence Seaway, permitting direct access to i...
  • Louis Riel Canadian Government
    1,002 words
    Louis Riel- Patriot or Traitor? Louis Riel was born in 1844. He was captured and executed by Canadian authorities in November 16, 1885. He was a leader who gave up his life and time to fight for the right of the Metis, Indians and the western settlers. He was an well-educated young man fluent in both French and English. He was also selected as the Metis's spokesman to negotiate with the Canadian government. During the 1869-70, he led the rebel when Canada purchases Manitoba from the Hudson's ba...
  • Canada In The Global Economy
    1,446 words
    Over the past few years, Canada's economy has done comparatively well and has demonstrated some resilience to the fluctuating global economy. However, Canada remains to be relatively less competitive with respect to other developed countries. In this paper I will attempt to take a closer look at Canada's position in the global economy today and examine the relevant issues. Competition is an important driver of innovation and productivity growth. Looking at the domestic Canadian economy, perhaps ...
  • The Wars World War
    1,285 words
    Robert Ross was a fictional character, but one who could be viewed a representative of how seriously the horrors of World War One affected impressionable young Canadian soldiers. Canada's involvement in the First World War was one of immense proportions. However, this tremendous commitment introduced many battle-unsullied Canadians to the horrors of war. The Dominion of Canada sent over 625, 000 men and several thousand women to the front from the years 1914-1918. " This was the beginning of the...
  • Naomis Uncle Immigrants Canadian Immigrant
    2,194 words
    Nikki Bum bacco Ms Harrison ENG OAC July 21, 2000 It is a fact that almost all of the people in Canada are immigrants, or come from immigrant descent. If it were not for the millions of people who have fled to Canada in hope of a better life, Canada would never have prospered into what it is today. As a result of this fact, it is hard to believe that immigrants are still faced with many hardships when they enter Canada. Most immigrants have good intentions in mind when coming to a new country. I...
  • A Remarkable Canadian General Arthur Currie
    651 words
    My very first question is, how did you come to be a Canadian General? From as long as I remember I always pictured myself to be in a General's outfit and have all these soldiers paying heed and accepting my command, however, this seemed like a distant and unrealistic dream to me at that time. At the beginning of the war I enlisted in the militia and this is which actually gave me the opportunity to work my way up the ranks to become a lieutenant colonel of the artillery. In your opinion, what sh...
  • Vimy Ridge Troops Canadian Battle
    1,205 words
    Defining Moments in Canada's History Vimy Ridge By Hiba Madi Mister Craigs CHC 2 D November 11 th 2003 Canada's Defining Moment in WWI The Battle of Vimy Ridge, 1917 The First World War is known for its destruction, people dieing, and many failures in the battles. Not many battles were successes and most of them turned into chaos and many people died basically like butchering. For example, in the battle of The Somme, 20 000 British soldiers were killed on the first day alone with 60 000 being wo...
  • Canada The Home Of My Identity
    649 words
    Everyone has an identity although some are stronger than they are in others. For example a person recently from England will have a stronger accent then someone who has lived his or her whole life in Canada, as with the person from Jamaica may have a stronger or less noticeable accent than others. This makes up part of the different identities that each of them possesses. My identity is not quite as clear to identify, but I can assure you that there is one there. I am a person who is half Danish...
  • English Immigrants Canadian Country
    441 words
    This article, written by Peggy Grant, described to us how hard a foreigner's life can be. A Japanese immigrant named Emiko gathered in enough courage to ask her Canadian neighbor to teach her some English so she can pass the test to receive her Canadian citizenship. Her Canadian neighbor was Peggy and every morning for six months, Emiko and Peggy studied, laughed and spent the quality time together. On the exam day, with Peggy's help, she passed the test after two consecutive tries and received ...
  • Multiculturalism In Canada Immigration Canadian People
    280 words
    Canada is often described as a multicultural nation. But what does that mean? Simply stated, it means that Canadians are not of any one cultural background, race or heritage. Instead, Canadians today reflect a vast diversity of cultural heritages and racial groups. The term multiculturalism first came to be used in the 1960's. It was used to counter the term "Biculturalism." Multiculturalism then, basically addressed the rights of the French-speaking people and English-speaking people. Multicult...
  • Is The Canadian Family Dying
    772 words
    Is The Family Dying? Is the Canadian family dying? Divorce rates across the country are on the rise, fewer long-term relationships result in marriage, and fewer children are sitting around the dinner table each night with their parents. These trends suggest that the traditional family is slipping from its roots, and in essence, dying. But what is a Canadian family? Many different definitions of family may be used in our modern day society, which include extended families, stepfamilies, blended f...
  • Assisted Suicide Canadian Laws Court
    242 words
    Assisted Suicide And Canadian Law Essay, Research Assisted Suicide And Canadian Law Assisted Suicide and Canadian Law Canada still has not come to a decision on the need for legalizing euthanasia or assisted suicide. A woman named Sue Rodriguez brought it out into open to become one of Canada's famous court debates. In February of 1994, she ended her life with the assistance of her doctor. She suffered from a terminal illness called ALS (a. k. a. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Lou Gehrig's di...