• Antitranscendentalists Anti Transcend
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    Antitranscendentalists Do you know anyone who is destroying themselves and others by their actions? If so this person is an anti transcendentalist. Anti transcendentalism is a literary term to describe a character's potential to do harm to themselves. Along with bringing harm to himself or killing himself, he usually brings harm to others in one form or another. Another characteristic of an anti transcendentalist character is that there is usually signs or clues that tell the character that he i...
  • Captain Ahab And Moby Dick
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    Captain Ahab and Moby Dick: Literary critics point to a variety of themes and juxtapositions when analyzing Herman Melville's "Moby Dick." Some see the land opposed to the sea or Fate opposed to free will. Most mention man versus nature or good versus evil. A perspective that seems overlooked though is the perspective of the self and the other. The self and other is when one discovers the other (something not us) within oneself, when one realizes that one is not a single being alien to anything ...
  • Moby Dick Or The Whale
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    I. Author Information Herman Melville, was born in 1819, in a very 'good' neighborhood in New York. A. Many influences on Melville's works were European literature, experiences in his travels, and tragedy in his life. B. Melville was born into the time when inspiring works of American literature began to emerge. Yet, European heritage in literature still had a strong hold on American writers of the time. C. Other contributions by Herman Melville were his narrative poems, and writings of other s...
  • Moby Dick Structure And Form
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    Moby Dick's structure is in a sense one of the simplest of all literary structures-the story of a journey. Its 135 chapters and epilogue describe how Ishmael leaves Manhattan for Captain Ahab's whaling ship, the Pequod, how Ahab pilots the Pequod from Nantucket to the Pacific in search of Moby Dick, and how in the end Ishmael alone survives the journey. This simple but powerful structure is what keeps us reading, as we ask ourselves, 'Where will Ahab seek out his enemy next? What will happen whe...
  • Biblical And Mythological All
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    Biblical and Mythological Allusions In Hermon Melville's 'Moby Dick';' An allusion is a reference to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art.' ; (Thompson 1155). Writers often use biblical and mythological allusions to which their readers are familiar. In Moby Dick, Herman Melville constantly uses biblical and mythological allusions. With these allusions the reader understand the topic of discussion and is also exposed to the wisdom and knowledge that Melville possess. T...
  • Captain Ahab Moby Dick
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    By: Adrienne Delaney Captain Ahab If you ever saw Captain Ahab in a dark alley, you'd probably turn and run the other way. His scarred body and wooden leg are just a couple of characteristics that show who he is. Ahab is the captain of the whaling ship Pequod, and their mission is to go on a trip and bring back as many whales as possible. Ahab has a different mission plan set in his mind. The grotesque scars and wooden leg are just horrible reminders of what can go wrong when man goes against na...
  • A Critical Analysis Of Herman Melville's Moby Dick
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    A Critical Analysis of Herman Melville's Moby Dick " Moby Dick is biographic of Melville in the sense that it discloses every nook and cranny of his imagination." (Humford 41) This paper is a psychological study of Moby Dick. Moby Dick was written out of Melville's person experiences. Moby Dick is a story of the adventures a person named Ishmael. Ishmael is a lonely, alienated individual who wants to see the "watery part of the world." Moby Dick begins with the main character, Ishmael, introduci...
  • Moby Dick Or White Whale
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    Ishmael, the narrator, announces his intent to ship aboard a whaling vessel. He has made several voyages as a sailor but none as a whaler. He travels to New Bedford, Massachusetts, where he stays in a whalers' inn. Since the inn is rather full, he has to share a bed with a harpooner from the South Pacific named Queequeg. At first repulsed by Queequeg's strange habits and shocking appearance, Ishmael eventually comes to appreciate the man's generosity and kind spirit, and the two decide to seek ...
  • Moby Dicks Symbolism Whale God Dick
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    Throughout the whole story the white whale is not only depicted as a an unexplainable force of nature but is also given an almost divine quality, he is constantly compared to God, and as the people fear and revere God they also fear Moby Dick and whales in general. The Whalers of the town see the whales not as thier prey but they see them as thier advisories. An advisory that equals and often times surpasses them in prowess. From the begining of the film we are confronted with the image of the w...
  • Moby Dick Qoutes Ch 36 And 86
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    Quotes from Moby Dick Chapter 36 Capitalism-On Pg. 170 Ahab says "All ye mast headers have before now heard me give orders of a white whale. Look ye! D'ye see this Spanish ounce of gold? It is a sixteen dollar piece men. Whoever of ye raises me a white headed whale with a wrinkled brow and a crooked jaw, he shall have this gold ounce. This example relates to capitalism because Ahab uses money as a way to motivate his men much like money is used as a motivator in a capitalist society. Transcenden...
  • Ahab's Evil Quest Melville's Symbols In Moby Dick
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    Ahab's Evil Quest: Melville's Symbols in Moby-Dick Herman Melville began working on his epic novel Moby-Dick in 1850, writing it primarily as a report on the whaling voyages he undertook in the 1830 s and early 1840 s. Many critics suppose that his initial book did not contain characters such as Ahab, Starbuck, or even Moby Dick, but the summer of 1850 changed Melville's writing and his masterpiece. He became friends with author Nathaniel Hawthorne and was greatly influenced by him. He also read...
  • Moby Dick Ahab White Birds
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    The classical selection by Herman Melville, Moby Dick focused on the significance of one man's obsession over a murderous white whale. As if the central plight of Captain Ahab was not enough of an obstacle to overcome, the piece is thus complicated by the Captain's mystique. The already complex situation was made more dramatic with the inclusion of Ishmael's interpretation of Ahab's character, Moby Dick's predominant influence and the mellow white birds that seemed to shadow Moby Dick at every s...
  • Moby Dick By Herman Melville
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    The Characters and Plot There are numerous characters in Moby Dick, but only a few of them have any impact on the story. A common sailor named Ishmael is the narrator. The book, however, focuses on Captain Ahab, the one-legged commander of the whaling ship Pequod. Ahab has sworn to kill the gigantic whale Moby Dick, who took away his leg. Starbuck is the first mate of the Pequod. Queequeg, Tash tego, and Dag goo are the three harpooners. The story begins with Ishmael becoming restless. He decid...
  • Moby Dick Innocent Or Evilinnocent Side
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    Moby Dick Innocent or Evil By Kevin Cook Can the lust for revenge, wealth, or power be so strong in a person that they become so enthralled by this lust that they become a madman This question could not be more fully answered, nor better demonstrated by the behavior of the captain of the whaling ship, The Peqoud, in Herman Melvilles book, Moby Dick. Captain Ahab becomes so obsessed with killing the whale, Moby Dick, that he becomes utterly insane with tracking it down. The baneful mind, and ranc...
  • Evil In The Writings Of Herman
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    The definition of evil, though very broad, is said to be morally reprehensible or the bringing of suffering and misfortune: for example, the opposite of good. Evil serves as everything that a person fears and hates. It serves as a foil to the qualities of good. Where good brings love, evil spawns hate; where good brings hope, evil creates despair. The conflict between Good and Evil can be traced back to Biblical times and can be characterized by the conflict between God and Satan. As the books ...
  • Moby Dick Ahab Obsession Whale
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    What the item is about The novel Moby Dick is the story of how Ishmael the narrator came to set sail on a fateful whaling voyage. He travels to Nantucket, where he visits the docks to find a ship; he discovers the Pequod. As Ishmael and his friend Queequeg make their way to board the ship, they meet a haggard looking, wild-eyed man who calls himself Elijah. He warns them against sailing with the Pequod, and hints that there might be something to fear about their mysterious captain, Ahab. Althoug...
  • Moby Dick Whale Ahab White
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    The meaning of the name itself is quite simple: The whale was often sighted in the vicinity of the Island of Mocha, and "Dick" was merely a generic name like "Jack" or "Tom." The transformation of "Mocha" to "Moby" presented a greater mystery. Melville himself never explained the origin of the latter word. The answer will probably never be known. The whiteness of the whale has many different meanings. There are obvious ones that are innocence, purity, and cleanliness. But there is also the aspe...
  • Moby Dick Billy Ahab Claggart
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    Monomania Written By Monomania Outline 1) Introduction a) Contrasts and comparisons introduced for: i) Moby-Dick ii) Billy Budd Compare 2) Fate and the role it plays in the two novels 3) Obsession and the role it plays in the two novels 4) The role and appearance of religion in the two novels Contrast 5) Openness and recognition of monomania in the main characters 6) Origin of the evil nature of main characters 7) The concept of innocence and how it does or does not apply to the main characters ...
  • Moby Dick Bartleby Ahab Narrator
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    A Comparison Of Melville'S Moby Dick AndA Comparison Of Melville'S Moby Dick And Bartleby Herman Melville's stories of Moby Dick and Bartleby share a stark number of similarities and differences. Certain aspects of each piece seem to compliment each other, giving the reader insight to the underlying themes and images. There are three concepts that pervade the two stories making them build upon each other. In both Moby Dick and Bartleby the main characters must learn how to deal with an antagonis...
  • Moby Dick Ahab Melville God
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    Ahab? s Evil Quest: Melville? s Symbols In Moby-Dick Ahab? s Evil Quest: Melville? s Symbols In Moby-Dick Ahab? s Evil Quest: Melville? s Symbols in Moby-Dick Herman Melville began working on his epic novel Moby-Dick in 1850, writing it primarily as a report on the whaling voyages he undertook in the 1830 s and early 1840 s. Many critics suppose that his initial book did not contain characters such as Ahab, Starbuck, or even Moby Dick, but the summer of 1850 changed Melville? s writing and his m...