• Araby The Maturity Of A Boy
    1,149 words
    The Maturity of a Boy Passion, adolescence, foolishness, and maturity are the first words that come to one's mind to describe James Joyce's short story, "Araby." In it, he writes about a boy who falls deeply in love with his best friend's sister, who through the story, doesn't seem to notice him or care about him. The boy, who has yet to be named, lives in a poor and run-down town. During the story, certain characters contribute to the boy's developing sense of maturity, and eventually, lead him...
  • Araby Norton Anthology
    1,852 words
    Alienation of "Araby" Although "Araby" is a fairly short story, author James Joyce does a remarkable job of discussing some very deep issues within it. On the surface it appears to be a story of a boy's trip to the market to get a gift for the girl he has a crush on. Yet deeper down it is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will somehow alleviate his miserable life. James Joyce's uses the boy in "Araby" to expose a story of isolation and lack of...
  • Araby Loss Of Innocence
    645 words
    Loss Of Innocence In James Joyce's Araby the boys loss of innocence may be confusing and even painful but at the same time it is important. It begins his journey into adulthood. The boy in Araby is experiencing something all young men experience, the first crush. It is a time in his life where he is having new feelings, and trying to express those feelings to the object of his affection is next to impossible. Even the simple act of watching Mangan's sister brings up emotions in the boy. To say t...
  • Araby Mangan's Sister
    1,205 words
    10/22/01 The Tragedy of Araby In James Joyce's Araby, a young boy finds himself in love with an older girl. The girl, Mangan's sister, refuses to love him back and instead ignores him. This crushes the boy and makes his hunger for her even more stronger. He sometimes finds himself hopelessly alone in the darkness thinking about her, awaiting for the day she would recognize his devotion to her. " At night in my bedroom... her image came between me and the page I strove to read (805)."At last she ...
  • Araby Mangan's Sister
    1,432 words
    The short story, "Araby", by James Joyce is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will alleviate his miserable life. Throughout the story he battles withdrawal and a lack of control. Moreover, the themes of alienation and control are inherently linked because the source of the boy's emotional distance is his lack of control over his life. The story begins as the boy describes his neighborhood. Immediately a feeling of alienation and bleakness prev...
  • Characterization Of Araby Mangan's Sister
    452 words
    Characterization in "Araby" Characterization is a major part in many short stories. The characters in a short story shape the story to make it more interesting to read. The main character of a story usually has human personalities that are familiar to the reader. All boys have a "crush " on an older girl when they are young. In "Araby", James Joyce shows all the feelings and emotions of a young boy's love for his friend " solder sister. The story takes place in Dublin, Ireland in the young narr...
  • Araby A Modernist Perspective
    1,148 words
    In 'Araby', the narrator is a young boy whose life up to this point has been simple and happy. The monotony of his life nurtures his childhood happiness and innocence, and from this state the boy is introduced to Joyce's version of reality that has been lurking before his eyes his entire life. Through hours spent at play on North Richmond Street outside his house our narrator is conditioned into a blissful state, and a hidden crush on his friend's sister extends this bliss into ecstasy. Our narr...
  • Young Boy Narrator End Story
    1,163 words
    Araby A Modernist Perspective Araby A Modernist Perspective Essay, Research Paper In ‘ Araby', the narrator is a young boy whose life up to this point has been simple and happy. The monotony of his life nurtures his childhood happiness and innocence, and from this state the boy is introduced to Joyce's version of reality that has been lurking before his eyes his entire life. Through hours spent at play on North Richmond Street outside his house our narrator is conditioned into a blissful s...
  • Mangan's Sister Boy Control Story
    1,435 words
    The short story, "Araby", by James Joyce is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will alleviate his miserable life. Throughout the story he battles withdrawal and a lack of control. Moreover, the themes of alienation and control are inherently linked because the source of the boy's emotional distance is his lack of control over his life. The story begins as the boy describes his neighborhood. Immediately a feeling of alienation and bleakness prev...
  • Araby By James Joyce
    1,428 words
    James Joyce's use of religious imagery and religious symbols in "Araby' is compelling. That the story is concerned somehow with religion is obvious, but the particulars are vague, and its message becomes all the more interesting when Joyce begins to mingle romantic attraction with divine love. "Araby' is a story about both wordly love and religious devotion, and its weird mix of symbols and images details the relationship– sometimes peaceful, sometimes tumultuous– between the two. In...
  • Araby James Joyce Comment
    745 words
    Comment on the narrative voice of the story. Why does the boy get disillusioned at the end of the story? Does the confrontation with the reality take place only at the end? At what moment in the story and in what details does he confront the actual? The narrative voice of Araby by James Joyce is the author taking on the role of a male whose name is never mentioned. From the description of the setting we learn that he lives with his aunt and uncle in a working class area of Dublin. In the beginni...
  • Mangan's Sister Joyce Boy Light
    1,338 words
    Formal Analysis Of James Joyce'S "Araby' Essay, Formal Analysis Of James Joyce'S "Araby' The experience of the boy in James Joyce's "Araby' illustrates how people often expect more than everyday reality can provide and upon that realization, they often feel disillusioned and disappointed. By using dark and obscure references, Joyce gives a more vivid picture of the boy's reality of living in the gloomy town of "Araby.' He uses dark and gloomy references to create the mood or atmosphere, and then...