• Utilitarianism Common Sense
    2,940 words
    Utilitarianism What things are good What actions are right Utilitarianism is a moral principle defined by Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill that can help answer these questions. The whole basis of Utilitarianism is that pleasure is good, pain is bad and every action one takes should maximize pleasure and minimize pain. In this paper I will argue that although in principle this moral theory sounds great, in the practical business world, this theory fails to always result in the correct moral ac...
  • Action Done Duty Moral Good
    3,209 words
    The Only Acceptable Motive For A Moral Action Is That It Should Be Done As A Sense Of Moral Duty. Is This A Justifiable Claim The only acceptable motive for a moral action is that it should be done as a sense of moral duty. Is this a justifiable claim Before it is possible to analyse whether the statement, The only acceptable motive for a moral action is that it should be done as a sense of moral duty, is a justifiable claim we must consider what ones moral duty is and if is it dependant or inde...
  • Kant The Universal Law Formation Of The Categorical Imperative
    1,539 words
    Kant: the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative Kantian philosophy outlines the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative as a method for determining morality of actions. This formula is a two part test. First, one creates a maxim and considers whether the maxim could be a universal law for all rational beings. Second, one determines whether rational beings would will it to be a universal law. Once it is clear that the maxim passes both prongs of the test, there are n...
  • The Categorical Imperative Applied To A False Promise
    1,498 words
    The Categorical Imperative Applied to a False Promise In the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant seeks to establish the supreme principle of morality (Kant. 392), the categorical imperative, to act as a standard to which actions can be evaluated for their moral worth. Kant believes that actions motivated by personal experience, whether through observation, indoctrination or some other capacity, lack moral worth because such actions are not determined by the conception of moral law. Wh...