• The Atomic Technology Of War
    1,693 words
    The Atomic Technology of War: The spread of atomic weapons. Scientists in several countries performed experiments in connection with nuclear reactors and fission weapons during World War II, but no country other than the United States carried its projects as far as separating uranium-235 or manufacturing plutonium-239. The Axis powers By the time the war began on Sept. 1, 1939, Germany had a special office for the military application of nuclear fission; chain-reaction experiments with uranium a...
  • Decision To Fund The Atomic Bomb
    2,091 words
    'No man-made phenomenon of such tremendous power had ever occurred before. The lighting effects beggared description. The whole country was lighted by a searing light with the intensity many times greater than that of the midday sun. It was golden, purple, violet, gray, and blue... .' (Groueff 355). The words of Brigadier General Thomas F. Farrell describe the onset of the atomic age, which began on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, New Mexico. This was the site of the first large-scale atomic test,...
  • Atom Bomb Fissionable Material
    1,090 words
    also called ATOM BOMB, weapon with great explosive power that results from the sudden release of energy upon the splitting, or fission, of the nuclei of such heavy elements as plutonium or uranium. When a neutron strikes the nucleus of an atom of the isotopes uranium 235 or plutonium-239, it causes that nucleus to split into two fragments, each of which is a nucleus with about half the protons and neutrons of the original nucleus. In the process of splitting, a great amount of thermal energy, as...
  • A Bomb A Uranium Plutonium Atomic
    3,632 words
    Atom bomb nuclear weapon manhattan project albert einstein Just before the beginning of World War II, Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Urged by Hungarian-born physicists Leo Szilard, Eugene Winner, and Edward Teller, Einstein told Roosevelt about Nazi German efforts to purify Uranium-235 which might be used tobuild an atomic bomb. Shortly after that the United States Government began work on the Manhattan Project. The Manhattan Project was the code name for the ...
  • The Manhattan Project Atomic Bomb
    1,562 words
    The Manhattan Project Nuclear research all started when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, and the United States entered into World War II. When the United States realized that Germany attempted to build an atomic bomb, Americans began to concentrate on their research about creating an atomic bomb more heavily. President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Manhattan Project, which included a group of top scientists, under General Leslie R. Groves, who worked around the clock to try to develop an at...
  • Chain Reaction Bomb Nuclear Uranium
    3,992 words
    Nuclear Weapons, explosive devices, designed to release nuclear energy on a large scale, used primarily in military applications. The first atomic bomb (or A-bomb), which was tested on July 16, 1945, at Alamogordo, New Mexico, represented a completely new type of artificial explosive. All explosives prior to that time derived their power from the rapid burning or decomposition of some chemical compound. Such chemical processes release only the energy of the outermost electrons in the atom. See A...
  • The A Bomb Uranium Fission Atomic
    745 words
    The Atomic Bomb The first atomic bomb was tested on July 16, 1945 at Alamogordo, New Mexico and was developed, constructed and tested by the Manhattan Project. The new device represented a completely new type of explosion. All explosives before this time got their power for the rapid burning of a chemical compound like gunpowder. These bombs could only do a limited amount of damage. This new group of nuclear explosives involved getting energy sources from within the nucleus of the atom. The Atom...
  • Fission Or Fusion Chain Reaction
    1,322 words
    Fission or Fusion I think that right now, fission is the only way that we can get more energy out of a nuclear reaction than we put in. First, the energy per fission is very large. In practical units, the fission of 1 kg (2. 2 lb) of uranium-235 releases 18. 7 million kilowatt-hours as heat. Second, the fission process initiated by the absorption of one neutron in uranium-235 releases about 2. 5 neutrons, on the average, from the split nuclei. The neutrons released in this manner quickly cause ...
  • Atomic Bomb Project Fission First
    1,903 words
    Little Boy On the morning of August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber named Enola Gay flew over the industrial city of Hiroshima, Japan and dropped the first atomic bomb ever used in war. The city went up in flames caused by the immense power equal to about 20, 000 tons of TNT. The project was a success. Hundreds of thousands died and still more were wounded. This was the final triumph that finally brought Japan to surrender. The effects of the bomb are still being seen but there is no doubt that the atom...
  • Uranium United States
    1,294 words
    Background Uranium is a hard, dense, malleable, ductile, silver-white element that has a symbol of U and atomic number of 92. It is chemically radioactive metallic element. Uranium is a member of the actinide series in group IIIb of the periodic table. It melts at about 1132 X C, boils at about 3818 X C, and has a specific gravity of 19. 05 at 25 X C. Uranium is very dense and at about 19 grams per cubic centimeter, it is 1. 6 times more dense than lead. The atomic weight of the element is 238....
  • Atomic Bomb War People Hiroshima
    2,256 words
    My name is Toma taki Amuro. Fortunately, I'm one of the few survivors after the most terrible weapon, the Atomic Bomb, had dropped on the city of Hiroshima. It was a horrible piece of memory. I wish I have not been born at that time. It was a nightmare for the people in Hiroshima. The Bomb affected the whole generation of people. It even affected our next generation. Thousands of babies were born handicapped or died after a few months after their births. Because their mothers absorbed too much ...
  • Nuclear Energy And What Happens When Things Go Wrong
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    Nuclear energy is a comparatively new source of energy. The first nuclear power plant was commissioned in June 1954 in Obninsk, Russia (reference 5). Fossil fuels offer a limited source of energy, as they are non-renewable. Eventually these supplies will cease, this is predicted to be in the next few decades. An estimate based on fuel consumption in America, predicts as early as 2020 there will be no fossil fuels left. The energy used by the whole world is approximated to be the coal equivalent ...
  • A Bomb 8212 Uranium Plutonium
    2,010 words
    Just before the beginning of World War II, Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Urged by Hungarian-born physicists Leo Szilard, Eugene Winner, and Edward Teller, Einstein told Roosevelt about Nazi German efforts to purify Uranium-235 which might be used to build an atomic bomb. Shortly after that the United States Government began work on the Manhattan Project. The Manhattan Project was the code name for the United States effort to develop the atomic bomb before the...
  • Atomic Bomb Japan War Truman
    3,336 words
    The Manhattan Project was one of the most secretive projects in the history of the United States. It took place during World War II and its purpose was to create a bomb by splitting atoms apart. This project was a success and created one of the most devastating bombs ever used by mankind, the atomic bomb. The president at the time, Harry S. Truman, had to face the many factors that were involved in making the decision to drop the bomb. In this paper I will discuss those and the events leading u...
  • Atomic Bomb War Uranium Japanese
    6,199 words
    The way the world thinks of war changed forever in 1945. On July 16 in Alamogordo, New Mexico, America exploded the world's first atomic bomb, sending a huge mushroom-shaped cloud high into the sky. The Manhattan Project, which was used to end World War II, was mostly led by German and German-Jewish scientists, who had escaped from Hitler's Germany. In 1939, an American university professor named Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in which he outlined the possibil...