• Quartering Act British Colonies Colonists
    2,838 words
    The British loss of the American colonies could have easily been prevented. British incompetence and a strong American want for self government are among the chief factors which caused the British loss. The first successful British colony, Jamestown, founded in Virginia in 1607, was plagued by problems caused by poor decision making capabilities. Before making any key decisions colonists had to communicate with the London Company in England, 3000 miles and six weeks away. For the colony to survi...
  • Townshend Acts Act British Colonies
    1,235 words
    With the research that I have done, I have come up with the following information on the events leading to the American Revolution. After the French-Indian War the British Government decided to reap greater benefits from the colonies. The colonies were pressed with greater taxes without any representation in Britain. This eventually lead to the Boston Tea Party. In retaliation the British passed what are now considered the Intolerable (or Coercive Acts) to bring the colonies to the heal of the K...
  • Taxation Without Representation British Colonists Britain
    1,267 words
    During the late seventeen hundreds, many events resulted in colonial opposition to Great Britain. The British created laws and taxes that were viewed as unjust and unfair. The colonists accepted Britain's rules and taxes at first, but only for a certain period. They soon grew weary of Britain and chose to declare their independence. The beginning of their turmoil began during the French and Indian War. Britain had passed a series of Navigation Acts. These acts were to forbid the colonists from ...
  • Gorge Washington British Colonists Army
    964 words
    Washington spent his years as a planter trying to gain economic independence from the London merchants who bought his crops. Like many colonists, he grew frustrated at what he and many other colonists saw as unfair laws. In the 1760 s, the colonists repeatedly clashed with the British Parliament over questions of taxation and trade. The British government had racked up a massive debt during the French and Indian War. Since American colonists had benefited from the British victory in this war, Pa...
  • American Revolution Stamp Act
    945 words
    1760- King George takes the throne of England. 1763- French and Indian War Ends. Canada and land east of the Mississippi River is added to Great Britiain's Empire. 1765- The Stamp Act is passed. The Stamp Act was passed as a means to pay for British troops on the American frontier. The colonists were the ones paying for the troops and they violently protested the Act. 1766- The Stamp Act is repealed. 1768- British troops arrive in Boston to enforce laws. 1770- Four workers are shot by British ...
  • Boston Massacre Soldiers Soldier One
    1,554 words
    The Boston Massacre was an extremely important event in American History. Also, it a very controversial topic. To this day, no one can really give an accurate description of the events that transpired. The Boston Massacre was not a random event at all; many actions led up to the massacre. As a result of this disaster, America was changed forever and sent on a road towards revolution. The Boston Massacre was a defining moment in American history. Many people believe that the Boston Massacre was ...
  • The American Revolution British Troops Colonies
    1,173 words
    The American Revolution was a conflict between 13 British colonies on the eastern seaboard of North America and their parent country, Great Britain. The war resulted in the colonies becoming a separate nation, the United Stated of America. It is also known as the American War of Independence. The Seven Years' War left Great Britain with the expensive responsibility of administering newly acquired territory in North America. The British Parliament passed the Stamp Act in 1765 to pay a share of t...
  • Cases Of The American Revolution
    1,541 words
    The colonists of America slowly came to realize that they must break from Britain due to the growing feeling of being considered lower than the British. They realized they had no say in government, and under the rule of the british, they would never be able to prosper. The conditions of their rights slowly disintegrated, as the construction of parliament becomes more and more powerful and intolerable. The language used to protest british, throughout the time, leading up to the revolutionary war,...
  • General Gage British Troops Colonists
    1,012 words
    1. Letter to friend in England. Dearest Friend of England, 1776 I know it is hard to believe we (the colonists) would be on the verge of a revolution against our own homeland. My father has explained to me the reasons we deserve independence from God, the King, and the British people. There are many things going on in the colonies to lead us to our current thoughts. The British people have imposed many Acts upon us colonists. In the year 1767, British parliament passed Mr. Charles Townshend pro...
  • The Revolutionary War Independence Britain British
    709 words
    The Revolutionary War of 1775-1783 is one of the greatest events in the American history. In fact it is the first one of it, for it was the war that won independence for 13 North American colonies of Great Britain, which later formed the United States of America. It all began after the end of costly French and Indian war of 1763. Britain imposed on the colonies new taxes and trade restrictions, which fueled growing resentment and added to the colonists' objection to their lack of representation ...
  • South Africa British Boers War
    3,724 words
    Fleming 01 James M. Fleming 22 March, 2001 How Great Britain won the Boer War in South Africa in 1902 On October 11, 1899, the forces of the Boer republics, Orange Free State and South African Republic, responded to Great Britain's dismissal of an ultimatum against the placement and reinforcing of British troops in South Africa by laying siege to cities in northern Cape Colony occupied by the then outnumbered British troops. The British were able to gain superiority and eventually win the Boer W...
  • Vimy Ridge Troops Canadian Battle
    1,205 words
    Defining Moments in Canada's History Vimy Ridge By Hiba Madi Mister Craigs CHC 2 D November 11 th 2003 Canada's Defining Moment in WWI The Battle of Vimy Ridge, 1917 The First World War is known for its destruction, people dieing, and many failures in the battles. Not many battles were successes and most of them turned into chaos and many people died basically like butchering. For example, in the battle of The Somme, 20 000 British soldiers were killed on the first day alone with 60 000 being wo...
  • American Revolution Stamp Act
    6,911 words
    In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things ...
  • Battle Of Lexington And Concord
    641 words
    On April 18, 1775 British General Thomas Gage in Boston was ordered to seize a cache of arms in Concord, a small town 15 miles away, and if possible, to capture John Hancock and Samuel Adams, two of the more outspoken rebel leaders. To accomplish this, Gage assembled approximately 700 troops commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith. Maintaining strict secrecy, the troops departed Boston at Midnight on the 19 th. However, the garrison was watched closely by the residents of Boston and the Ma...