• Dialects In American Literature
    2,061 words
    Dialects in American Literature In the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries dialect was not common in American Literature. Writers who attempted to accurately capture American dialect and slang often failed to make it believable. In my essay, "Dialects in American Literature," I will compare and contrast three writers who used dialect in their writings and explain the difference between effective and ineffective use of dialect. The writers I will be discussing are Mark Twain, Bret Harte, and Wil...
  • Henry James American Life Matthiessen
    1,078 words
    Post-Civil War American Literature saw a transition from the prominence of romance to the development of realism. In the late 1800's, the United States was experiencing swift growth and change as a result of a changing economy, society, and culture because of an influx in the number of immigrants into America. (Spiller 35) Whereas authors previously sought to 'idealize human beings, fall in love with a dream, and then, reject the real man or woman who had inspired the dream', they now worked to ...
  • Society Urban American James
    1,018 words
    During the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, a period known as the Gilded Age, every man had the potential to become wealthy, to advance into the esteemed social class of the well- to-do. While this may have been perceived as true by the wealthy, it was little more than a concept of idealism. In reality, while the rich may have worn diamonds, [most] wore rags. New immigrants and rural Americans flooded into urban areas searching for opportunity. They were welcomed by long work...
  • Realism And Henry James
    1,796 words
    Realism, in the broadest of definitions, is the faithful representation of reality or verisimilitude. The realist is considered to be the "philosophical extrovert." Within the scope of American literature, 'realism's pans the time period from the Civil War to the turn of the century. Some claim that American realism was the product of a country shaken by war combined with technological advances and increased consciousness of nationhood. Realism, according to Weinberg, "denies the continuum of ti...
  • Henry James And William Dean Howells
    1,083 words
    Post-Civil War American Literature saw a transition from the prominence of romance to the development of realism. In the late 1800's, the United States was experiencing swift growth and change as a result of a changing economy, society, and culture because of an influx in the number of immigrants into America. (Spiller 35) Whereas authors previously sought to "idealize human beings, fall in love with a dream, and then, reject the real man or woman who had inspired the dream", they now worked to ...
  • William Dean Howells Lapham Silas House
    1,879 words
    In the novel, The Rise of Silas Lapham, William Dean Howells makes a particular point about the morals of an individual in the business world. His point is that an individual, such as Silas, must check their morals at the door if they have any plans to make it in the business world. The novel has always been popular, partly because it presents Lapham's financial and social failure as "consciously and deliberately chosen" when he has to decide whether he shall cheat and stay on top in business or...
  • Editha Mother Howells Doesn
    502 words
    Feminism in American Short Stories Editha, by William Dean Howells and The Revolt of Mother, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, present essentially the same type of character in two very distinct manners. Howells depicts Editha as a selfish and spoiled lady, while Freeman describes mother as a strong-willed person who simply does things when they need to be done. Howells gives the reader the impression that Editha is a very harsh and abrupt woman who totally disregards the feelings of others. When she...