• Socrates Obeying The State
    1,126 words
    In Crito, Plato recounts the last days of Socrates, immediately before his execution was to take place in Athens. In the dialogue, Socrates' pupil, Crito, proposes that Socrates escape from prison. Socrates considers this proposal, trying to decide whether escaping would be "just" and "morally justified." Eventually, Socrates concludes that the act is considered "unjust" and "morally unjustified." Socrates then decides to accept his fate and proceeded with his execution. Socrates was a man who w...
  • Socrates Universal Definition
    1,803 words
    Socrates: A Great Philosopher Kimberly Whitaker Honors Survey of World History: HOUR 1151 Dr. V eula J. Rhodes, Instructor Albany State University November 22, 1999 Foreword Thesis: Exploring Socrates and his philosophies give the seeker a new understanding of the life and society in which Socrates lived. With this new understanding, one can compare or contrast other views of the period. In doing this, the researcher is provided with a map of ideas and philosophies throughout history. This map ...
  • Socrates Refusal Flee Athens
    797 words
    "Courage does not lie within an action, but within a person." Socrates believed strongly in these words, but why would a man face his own death, especially when an option to avoid his demise is readily available During his Apology Socrates said; "For anything that man can tell, death may be the greatest good that can happen to them... ." and continued by stating that he considered both conceivable states of death a gain. One which is an eternal night filled with peaceful rest, and the more commo...
  • Innocent Man Socrates Death State
    941 words
    Socrates, considered by many historians as the greatest mind to ever live, spent his final days under the false accusations of the law. These accusation were that Socrates was not worshipping the gods of the popular ancient culture, and was also corrupting the young with his constant questioning of the truths of other philosophers. Socrates defended himself under the eyes of the court, and proved to all through reason that the accusations of the court were false. However, the jury had found Socr...
  • Question Can A Person Perform Evil Acts Voluntarily
    335 words
    Question: Can a person perform evil acts voluntarily Evil corrupts the evil doer. Is there anyone, then, who wishes to be harmed by those he associates with, rather than to be benefited In defending himself against accusations of corruption and evil, Socrates argues in his apology that no person performs evil acts voluntarily. Meletus, Socrates principal accuser, claims that wicked people like Socrates do harm to others intentionally. Meletus accuses Socrates of corrupting the youth, of harming ...
  • Socrates Euthyphro Gods Crito
    1,669 words
    Socrates, in his conviction from the Athenian jury, was both innocent and guilty as charged. In Plato's Five Dialogues, accounts of events ranging from just prior to Socrates' entry into the courthouse up until his mouthful of hemlock, both points are represented. Socrates' in dealing with moral law was not guilty of the crimes he was accused of by Miletus. Socrates was only guilty as charged because his peers had concluded him as such. The laws didn't find Socrates guilty; Socrates was guilty ...
  • Public Gods Socrates Athens Death
    703 words
    The Innocence of Socrates The goals of this paper will be to explore the death of Socrates and to support the thesis that the jury at Socrates' trial was not justified in its decision to sentence him to death. One of the major charges against Socrates in his trial was that of 'impiety.' This allegation specifically referred to Socrates' neglect of the accepted public gods of the city and introducing new gods. 'Neglecting the public gods' may have referred to Socrates' individualistic optimism wh...
  • Socrates Defense Found Guilty
    854 words
    The accusers, Meletos, Any tos, and Lycos, are all young and trying to make a name for themselves. They begin by telling everyone not to be deceived and to take caution because Socrates is a "clever speaker." According to Socrates, the difference between him and his accusers is that he speaks the truth. He is on trial for two items, which include, corrupting the youth and impiety. Socrates tells everyone that he has no experience with the court and he will speak the way he is used to by being ho...
  • Socrates Gods Worshipped By The State These Men
    774 words
    Socrates (470-399 BC) Socrates was born to a poor Athenian family in 470 BC He spent most of his time teaching others. One of his pupils was Plato. Socrates was a believer in absolute truth rather than relative truth. His main interest was the process by which people learned how to think for themselves. He would usually talk to whoever would take the time to listen. He asked many questions and criticized answers. His style of conversation has been given the name Socratic dialogue. Socrates woul...
  • Crito Socrates Arguments Evil
    784 words
    1. Crito's Arguments The arguments of Crito are centred and clear. He uses simple persuasion to try and convince Socrates to escape. His arguments push the idea that Socrates should attempt escape for the sake of others, namely his children, friends and the many. Crito points out that other men would have no hesitation in escaping, despite their age. This is dismissed when Socrates states that someone who has lived so long should rejoice in the fact that they have had such a full life. Some of ...
  • Socrates Accepts His Fate
    969 words
    Socrates Accepts His Fate Socrates was condemned to death for corrupting the youth of Athens. One of his students, Crito, visited Socrates in prison and tried to convince him to escape. Socrates refused, warranting that laws are meant to be obeyed. Socrates argued by stating that without the laws, he would not be the man he was. In other words, the laws had a sort of parental authority over him. He also stated that he had entered into an implied contract with the city-state of Athens. Finally, ...
  • Plato's Apology Youth Of Athens
    929 words
    Plato's Apology Socrates was a very simple man who did not have many material possessions and spoke in a plain, conversational manner. Acknowledging his own ignorance, he engaged in conversations with people claiming to be experts, usually in ethical matters. By asking simple questions, Socrates gradually revealed that these people were in fact very confused and did not actually know anything about the matters about which they claimed to be an expert. Socrates felt that the quest for wisdom and ...
  • The Nature Of Philosophy According To Socrates
    674 words
    The original word for philosophy steams from the Greek word philosophy, meaning love of wisdom. Although Socrates himself never claimed to have any answers to the questions he raised, his views and methods of philosophy are the cornerstone of what philosophy is today. The nature of philosophy, as viewed by Socrates, is centred around the wellness of the soul, virtue being defined as knowledge and the pursuit of truth through the questioning of beliefs. Socrates heavily subscribed to a dualistic ...
  • Socrates Athens Plato Government
    1,283 words
    SOCRATES Socrates was a Greek philosopher who lived between 470-399 B. C. He turned Greek attention toward questions of ethics and virtue and away from those of the heavenly bodies. Socrates spent much time in the Agora (marketplace) where he held conversations with townspeople. Socrates believed that real truth could be found out through thought and collaboration with others. He was known for exposing ignorance, hypocrisy, and conceit. Despite having many followers, Socrates was disliked by mo...
  • Socrates Innocent Or Guilty
    1,849 words
    Living in a democracy, everyone is exposed through television and other various forms of media everyday to numerous trials by jury. Usually they are rarely given a second thought, but every once in a while along comes a specific trial which captures the attention of the entire country. This goes the same for trials throughout centuries in our past. Although they did not have the same forms of media as in this, modern era, there were still specific trials in which everyone knew about. One trial t...
  • Socrates Corrupting The Youth
    645 words
    Socrates Socrates was accused of many things in the Athens market. Socrates was accused of being a man who makes the worse argument into the stronger argument. A man who knows about the heavens and earth and therefore any one who believe this must not believe in the gods. Socrates was accused of being an atheist. Most of the people that followed him around his quest were inquisitive. Where as most adults would walk by Socrates with his "annoying question" the youth stopped to see what he had to ...
  • Corrupting The Youth Socrates People Athens
    1,853 words
    I will begin this paper with a brief account of Socrates. I feel this is necessary for those who are not familiar with Socrates. It is as follows: Socrates (C. 470-399 B. C. ) Athenian philosopher who allegedly wrote down none of his views, supposedly from his belief that writing distorts ideas. His chief student, Plato, is the major source of knowledge about his life. Socrates questioned Athenians about their moral, political, and religious beliefs, as depicted in Plato^s dialogues; his questi...
  • Socrates Life Athens Plato
    832 words
    Socrates was a Greek philosopher and teacher. His teachings, life and death have made him one of the most admired people in history. Although he wrote no books or developed a regular school of thought, his influence inspired others to. Socrates affected the entire course of Western thought. I believe Socrates to be one of the most important philosophers ever. Born in Athens, Socrates (470-399 BCE) was the son of a wealthy sculptor. There he received the regular elementary education in literatur...
  • Socrates Apology Continued His Defense
    394 words
    Socrates made the correct choice to continue with his "Apology" after he received this guilty verdict. Socrates continued his defense after he received the guilty verdict for several reasons. I think the reasons why he continued his defense are: he wanted to acknowledge the Athenians who voted for his acquittal and guilt, and the jury still had to decide Socrates' punishment. When the jury gave him the death penalty, Socrates' continued his defense to tell the people who found him guilty that he...
  • An Apology From Socrates
    1,720 words
    An Apology From Socrates' The Apology is Socrates' defense at his trial. As the dialogue begins, Socrates notes that his accusers have cautioned the jury against Socrates " eloquence, according to Socrates, the difference between him and his accusers is that Socrates speaks the truth. Socrates distinguished two groups of accusers: the earlier and the later accusers. The earlier group is the hardest to defend against, since they do not appear in court. He is all so accused of being a Sophist: th...