• Jane Eyre And The Theme Of Independence
    633 words
    In Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre, a theme of independence is portrayed throughout the entire book. The main character, Jane Eyre, is constantly seeking ways in which she can achieve independence. She has always depended on herself since she was a young child due to the death of both her parents and eventually becoming an unwanted orphan. Jane has been through many painful situations throughout the book and understands then eed for independence. The beginning of Jane's life is spent living a...
  • Jane Eyre's Struggle For Love
    523 words
    The overriding theme of "Jane Eyre," is Jane's continual quest for love. Jane searches for love and acceptance through the five settings in which she lives: Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, Moor House, and Fern dean. Through these viewpoints, the maturation and self-recognition of Jane becomes evident, as well as traceable. It is not until Jane flees from Rochester and Thornfield, and spends time at Moor House, that her maturation to womanhood is complete. At this point, Jane is able to finally re...
  • Elemental Imagery In Jane Eyre
    566 words
    The use of elemental imagery in Jane Eyre, revealed throughout the novel both literally and metaphorically, is one of Charlotte Bronte s key stylistic devices. The opposition of the two elements, fire and water, highlights the need for the characters to find equilibrium between the two. Fire can describe passion and warmth, but it can also burn. Water can describe coolness and comfort, but it can also chill. Because of Charlotte Bronte s use of elemental imagery in her book, Jane Eyre, the reade...
  • Jane Eyre 2 White Imagery
    950 words
    Charlotte Bronte uses colour imagery frequently throughout Jane Eyre. In the novel Jane Eyre, colour imagery is used to convey that there are two sides in every character and that the temptation and enclosure of evil is always beckoning and binding. Red imagery, black imagery and white imagery are used in Jane Eyre to emphasize the two different forces battling against one another. Red throughout the novel represents hell and evil and demonstrates the wicked side of every human being. Frequently...
  • The Yellow Wallpaper By Charlotte Perkins Gilman
    317 words
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman's story, "The Yellow Wallpaper," explores the restricted societal roles of both Jane and John. Gilman, a strong supporter of women's rights, focuses on her account with depression through this story (Hill 150). Traditionally, the man must take care of the woman both financially and emotionally while the woman's role remains at home. Society tends to trap man and woman and prevent them from developing emotionally and intellectually. Although Gilman focuses on the hardshi...
  • Jane Eyre 2 Thornfield Hall
    1,652 words
    Jane Eyre is the main character in the novel Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte. She is a fictional character along with the book. The book takes place in the mid 1800's. Jane lives in five different places which greatly affect her life. The first place Jane stays is Gateshead Hall. She then goes to live at Lowood School. From Lowood Jane proceeds on to Thornfield Hall. She then advances on to Moor House. Finally, Jane reaches her final home at Ferndean. All of this happens within two decad...
  • Jane Eyre Mrs Reed
    1,779 words
    Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bront " chapter Summaries Chapter I- We learn that Jane Eyre is an orphan who lives with her cruel aunt Mrs. Reed. A bully John throws a book at Jane Eyre and her suppressed anger from over the years explodes in a rage attacking the bully. Chapter II-Jane gets locked in the red room where Mr. Reeds' brother died. Chapter III-The last chapter ended with Jane knocked out and she woke up very confused and terrified. Chapter IV-In this chapter Jane finds the courage to stand ...
  • Jane Eyre Childhood Home
    885 words
    Jane's Journey Through Suffering in Jane Eyre In the book Jane Eyre by Charolette Bronte, Jane encounters many different settings and people. Jane is put through horrible suffering and refuses to give her abusers the satisfaction of viewing her inner anguish. Jane accomplishes this through stoicism. This occurs many times in the book throughout Jane's life. Within Jane's life, she travels through her childhood home Gateshead Hall, Lowood School, and finally Edward Rochester's Thornfield. In each...
  • Jane Eyre's Self Discovery
    621 words
    The novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte consists of continuous journey through Jane's life towards her final happiness and freedom. Jane's physical journeys contribute significantly to plot development and to the idea that the novel is a journey through Jane's life. Each journey causes her to experience new emotions and an eventual change of some kind. These actual journeys help Jane on her four figurative journeys, as each one allows her to reflect and grow. Jane makes her journey from Gateshe...
  • Jane Eyre Book John Reed
    352 words
    In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, we are introduced to Jane, the orphan protagonist of the story. When the novel first begins, she is an isolated, powerless ten- year old living with an aunt and her cousins whom do not like her. Jane feels alienated from the Reed family; therefore she spends much of her time alone. Jane is faced with two factors; one she is a girl, and two she is poor. These two factors contribute too much of Jane's unhappiness, at least at this point in the book! Her ...
  • Jane Eyre Miss Temple
    1,472 words
    In Charlotte Bronte's, Jane Eyre, Jane goes through numerous self-discoveries, herself-realization and discipline leads her to a life she chooses to make her happy. Jane Eyre has a rough life from the start. Forced to stay with people who despise her, Jane can only help herself. Jane must overcome the odds against her, which add to many. Jane is a woman with no voice, until she changes her destiny. The novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte consists of continuous journeys through Jane's life towar...
  • Jane Eyre Independence Aunt Reed
    482 words
    In Charlotte Bronte s famous book Jane Eyre, a girl was portrayed that was growing up around the turn of the nineteenth century. Jane was an orphan with no family or friends. She was mistreated and misunderstood by the people around her. Jane seemed doomed for a life of failure, until she decided to go against all odds and stand up for the life of success she deserved. Jane s actions opened the doors for a new interpretation of women and showed that it was possible for a woman of the nineteenth ...
  • Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte Theme
    890 words
    Longing for Love Charlotte Bronte created the novel "Jane Eyre," with an overriding theme of love. The emotional agony that the main character experiences throughout the novel stem from the treatment received as a child, loss of loved ones, and economic hardships. To fill these voids, Jane longs for love. Ironically, Jane rejects affection at some point throughout the novel though it is that which she seeks. Her painful childhood experiences create an emotional center derived from this pain. Thu...
  • Mrs Reed Jane Girl Independent
    392 words
    Jane Eyre, a novel written by Charlotte Bronte, is about a young girl named Jane that struggles to discover her identity. Jane's a girl who is "unhappy, very unhappy" (23). She grows up with relatives that treat her unfairly because her diseased family was not wealthy. Jane's uncle Mr. Reed had reminded his wife and family to consider Jane as their own, but in contrast she experienced physical abuse by her aunt and cousin John. "John Reed knocked me down and my aunt shut me up in the red-room.....
  • Jane Addams Hull House
    1,204 words
    Jane Addams founded Hull House in 1889, along with her friend Ellen Starr. Jane had a very compassionate heart from the time she was a young girl. Everywhere she went, Jane had a desire to help people less fortunate than herself. Jane's father helped shape her to become more charitable to others less fortunate. Even as a young girl Jane wanted to know why all people did not live in nice homes with yards like her own. One day she saw a part of town that was run down and she could hardly believe ...
  • Jane Eyre Rochester First Relationship
    692 words
    Charlotte Bront's Jane Eyre can be viewed in many different ways, but most of all, it is a romantic novel Some, however, don't see it this way. The beginning stages of the love relationship between Jane and Mr. Rochester's are a bit unusual. Some may say Mr. Rochester treats Jane unfairly. It's not until later on in the story when Jane meets another man, that she realizes her true love for Mr. Rochester. This is what makes a romantic novel. There are two stages or parts to the relationship betw...
  • Jane Eyre Mrs Fairfax
    504 words
    Vol ICh. 11-Vol II 7 Janes arrival at the Thornfield Charlotte Brontes Jane Eyre displays three types of relationships possessing different purposes. These connections are established at Thornfield after Jane becomes a governess and accepts the position at the estate. The first relationship is the one that forms between Mrs. Fairfax, the housekeeper, and Jane. Another relationship that begins upon arrival at Thornfield is the one that Jane possesses with Adele, her pupil. The last and most impo...
  • Short Paper On Jane Eyre
    412 words
    In Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte intertwines various religious ideas in her mid-nineteenth century English setting. Throughout the novel, Jane Eyre blends various religious insights which she has learned from different sources. While Jane was young, she had only a Biblical textbook outlook on life combined with the miserable emotional conditions of her surroundings. This in turn led to Jane being quite mean with Mrs. Reed. When Jane eventually goes off to Lowood and meets Helen Burns, she learns o...
  • Morals And Psychological Aspects In Jane Eyre
    370 words
    Morals And Psychological Aspects in Jane Eyre Jane Eyre takes the idea of a fairy tale a step further by adding psychological aspects to the story. Jane did the right thing in regards to marrying Mr. Rochester because "what is [considered] morally wrong cannot be psychologically right." In other words, Jane's moral values told her what Mr. Rochester had done wrong. Because of this she cannot "psychologically" go along with it as if nothing was wrong. Psyche and morals both are products of the m...
  • The Autobiography Of Jane Pittman
    470 words
    Jane Pittman was born sometime before the Civil War. She was a slave from the day she was born. Jane had no parents; her mother died as a result of a beating when Jane was a child, and Jane did not know her father. She lives in the old slave quarters on a plantation outside Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One day Jane met a Yankee Soldier name Mr. Brown told Jane that one day she was going to be free, and she would not have to no longer listen to anyone or follow anyone's rules. Jane's slave name was T...