• Descartes Meditation One Evil Genius
    632 words
    Descartes' Meditation One Being a foundational ist, Descartes needs to destroy the foundations of his beliefs so that in his Meditations he will be able to build upon new foundations of undeniable and self evident truths. In order to do this Descartes must first find a valid argument that will allow him to doubt his foundation beliefs and in turn doubt what is considered to be reality. He begins by first noting that one can not trust their own senses, because we can be deceived by our sciences. ...
  • Descartes Skeptical Argument And Responses By Bouwsma And Malcolm
    2,371 words
    Descartes's keptical Argument and Responses by Bouwsma and Malcolm In this essay, I will examine Rene Descartes's keptical argument and responses by O. K. Bouwsma and Norman Malcolm. I intend to prove that while bothBouwsma and Malcolm make points that refute specific parts of Descartes " argument in their criticisms, neither is sufficient in itself to refute the whole. In order to understand Descartes' argument and its sometimes radical ideas, one must have at least a general idea of his motiv...
  • Descartes Existence Of God
    596 words
    The existence of God has been a question since the idea of God was conceived. Descartes tries to prove Gods existence, to disprove his Evil demon theory, and to show that there is without a doubt something external to ones own existence. He is looking for a definite certainty, a foundation for which he can base all of his beliefs and know for a fact that they are true. Descartes overall project is to find a definite certainty on which he can base all his knowledge and beliefs. A foundation that ...
  • Descartes Proof Of God
    988 words
    Rene Descartes' arguments in "Meditations on First Philosophy" are questionable to exactly how valid and sound they really are. His proof for the existence of God in the fifth meditation is an example of one of his invalid and therefore unsound arguments. Throughout the meditations Descartes refers to clear and distinct ideas. Descartes first introduces doubt to the reader by saying that one cannot trust these clear and distinct ideas. "I have noticed that the senses are sometimes deceptive; as ...
  • Descartes Philosophy Evil Genius
    776 words
    Descartes' "evil genius scenario" provides the possibility for the existence of an evil genius that is in control of our world in place on an omnipotent god. By in control, I mean that he would in some magical way compose our lives by his own will, thus making any certain knowledge about material objects impossible. This scenario presents some real questions with Descartes' argument because it basically completely rules out the possibility of any god. We are imagining that Dr. Spiritus has inva...
  • Descartes And Berkeley On Skepticism About The Senses
    782 words
    Descartes and Berkeley on Skepticism About the Senses The philosophers Gero ge Berkeley and Renee Descartes both had strong opinions on skepticism about the senses. In this paper, I will explain their philosophies and why they are different and then evaluate them. In his Meditations on First Philosophy, Descartes suggests that the senses are like a friend who has lied to you once and whom you therefore cannot trust, at least not until youve proven that he or she is not an evil genius. The possib...
  • Plato Vs Descartes Evil Genius
    1,897 words
    Compare the arguments for the distinctness of body and soul [or psyche ] in Plato s Phaedo with Descartes arguments for the distinctness of body and mind [in the Meditations and elsewhere] After reading Plato s Phaedo, we can see that there are many differences between the body and soul. Plato outlines these in some of the arguments given by Socrates. The first time the differences are brought to our attention, is when Plato talks about how a true philosopher would welcome death instead of being...
  • Bouwsma's Descartes' Evil Genius
    1,093 words
    Dylan Ragan Oct. 28, 1999 PHIL 1000 H/Weller The Intent of Bouwsma's "Descartes' Evil Genius" Bouwsma's essay critiques Descartes' use of the evil demon in his Meditations on First Philosophy through the creation of two situations in which the "evil genius" attempts to use his powers for their express purpose, that of deception. Bouwsma conveniently admits the existence of "four or five clear and distinct ideas" and goes on to show that the evil genius is capable of deceiving mankind about every...