• Book Report On Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov
    3,120 words
    Book Report on Dostoevsky's 'The Brothers Karamazov " CHARACTERIZATION The main characters of Dostoevsky's novel The Brothers Karamazov are, as the title suggests, the members of the Karamazov 'family,' if it can indeed be called such. The only things that the members of this family share are a name and the 'Karamazov curse,' a legacy of base impulses and voluptuous lust. References to this tendency towards immorality are sprinkled heavily throughout the novel; phrases such as 'a brazen brow and...
  • Suffering Crime And Punishment
    890 words
    In the novel Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky, suffering is an integral part of every character's role. Dostoevsky uses comic characters as instruments for competing ideological issues. A typical example is the loquacious bar room character Marmeladov, an alcoholic with an ironic abstract side to his personality. Through his behavior, Marmeladov draws the reader's attention to questions about environmental and psychological influence and theology and specifically, the conflict between ...
  • Understanding Dostoevsky Notes From Underground
    706 words
    While confronting Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground seems a difficult task initially, one must be able to transcend the elaborate diction and parodies, and comprehend the author himself, while also taking root the message Dostoevsky had originally intended in the time it was addressed. Understanding the author himself, along with the period in which the work was written, augments one's overall discernment of the passage. In the age he wrote, Dostoevsky must have seemed eccentric and outlandish...
  • Arrogant And Pompous Raskolnokov People Dostoevsky
    1,274 words
    In Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky gives the reader an inside look to the value system that he holds for himself, as well as the type of characteristics that he abhors in people as well as the characteristics that he admires in people. He uses characters in the novel to express his beliefs of what a person should be like in life to be a 'good'; person. Specifically he uses Raskolnokv to show both good and bad characteristics that he likes in people. Also he uses Svidrigliov and Luzhin to demons...
  • The Grand Inquisitor Story Ivan Man
    966 words
    The Grand Inquisitor The Grand Inquisitor reflects Fyodor Dostoevsky interest in religious and political issues. Dostoevsky uses the voices of his characters to express his views on the legitimacy of the Roman Catholic Church and role of religion in society. The story centers around the conflict between the Grand Inquisitor and Jesus. Jesus returns to Earth during the Spanish Inquisition, when in which Jews and Muslims were forced to convert to Christianity and were murdered if not devoted in th...
  • Crime And Punishment By Feodor Dostoevsky
    655 words
    Crime and Punishment by Feodor DostoevskThe passage in Crime and Punishment, by Feodor Dostoevsky, which best represents the rest of the story is found in Part Five, Chapter IV, page 350, second to last paragraph. At this point in the story, Raskolnikov has revealed to Sonia that he is the murderer, and is trying to explain to her his reasons for this action. He tells her of his theory that if one has the ability to do a monumental action, and only the lives of a few people stand in the way of t...
  • The Truth About Orthodox Christianity
    2,174 words
    As described in The Grand Inquisitor by Dostoevsky The writings of Fyodor Dostoevsky and Helen Ellerbe show substantial evidence that the orthodox Christians did in fact steal from humanity the divine freedom it was promised by Jesus Christ. This thesis is supported in Dostoevsky's "The Grand Inquisitor" from his book The Brothers Karamazov. The dark side of Christian history by Helen Ellerbe also supports this theory. The Inquisition itself shows credibility to the theory that orthodox Christia...
  • Crime And Punishment Liberty Of Thought
    1,590 words
    The Crime of Alienation The massacre of 25 students at a high school in Colorado shook the nation as the most devastating and heartless crime of youth. No one questions that these murders were a crime to society, as no one questions that rape, assault, and theft are also crimes. Society has dictated and labeled these actions as crimes because they harm others. One must question, however, whether the crime lies more in what caused the action. Many works of literature have posed this idea, but it ...
  • Convicting Raskolnikov Dostoevsky's Views On Criminal Justice
    2,800 words
    At the close of Crime and Punishment, Raskolinkov is convicted of Murder and sentenced to seven years in Siberian prison. Yet even before the character was conceived, Fyodor Dostoevsky had already convicted Raskolinkov in his mind (Frank, Dostoevsky 101). Crime and Punishment is the final chapter in Dostoevsky's journey toward understanding the forces that drive man to sin, suffering, and grace. Using ideas developed in Notes from Underground and episodes of his life recorded in Memoirs of the H...
  • Raskolnikov A Tragic Hero
    774 words
    The character Rodin Romanov na Raskolnikov from Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel Crime and Punishment is a classic example of a tragic hero. His life as a man of many redeeming qualities takes a turn for the worst as his desires to improve his existence lead him to surrender to temptations that inevitably ruin his life. Fortunately, Raskolnikov's life does not end in tragedy, for he is able to find comfort and peace of mind through the unconditional love of his friends and family. Through Raskolnikov, ...
  • Crime And Punishment Dostoevsky Society Raskolinkov
    780 words
    Mid-nineteenth-century Russia is a mass of people and marked by political suppression. It is cursed with poor living conditions and immorality. The brutality of existence in the city of St. Petersburg is where we find those who wish to rise above the chaos and madness of the time. We find Rodin Raskolinkov, a poor university student who murders a pawnbroker in order to prove to himself that he is not subject to moral law. Raskolinkov, like most of our kind, is isolated from himself, others and f...
  • Moore Bruder Macbeth Existential Raskolnikov
    1,751 words
    A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime AndA Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment Shakespeare? s? Macbeth? and Dostoevsky? s Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but ea...