• The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe
    2,637 words
    The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe By C. S. Lewis The four children, Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy had to stay at the home of a professor in the time of the second world war. Because there was not much to do and it rained a lot, the children decided to look around the house. They came across a room that had nothing in it, but a big wardrobe. Peter, Susan and Edmund found nothing interesting, and left the room. But Lucy opened the wardrobe, and looked inside. There were many coats in it. She l...
  • The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe An Analysis
    380 words
    The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe: An Analysis The main characters in this story are Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy. During a war in London they were sent to a professor's house outside London. Lucy, while exploring with her brothers and sister, found a secret passage through the wardrobe to Naria, a secret world. In Naria there are other characters. One of them is the White Witch, also known as the Queen of Naria, who was like a tyrant. If anyone disobeyed her she turned them to stone. Ano...
  • White Witch Aslan Lion Narnia
    1,543 words
    The Chronicles of Narnia, the fabulous fantasy series for children of all ages, combines many endearing elements of childhood fantasy: enchantment, tricks with time, other worlds, talking animals, and royal, courtly procedures. The successful and convincing combination of all these elements engages the reader. The avuncular narration and the ease of reading invite early readers to engage in independent reading while amazing adult readers with its clarity and simplicity. The Bible provides the mo...
  • The Lion The Witch And The Wardrobe
    753 words
    The implied reader of this story would be someone willing to believe in a world such as Narnia, where the personification of animals is real and where children can become Kings and Queens. Not only would the reader have to believe in the imaginative reality of Narnia but also in the characters portrayed in the novel, for example Mr. Tum nus, "[f]rom the waist upward he was like a man, but his legs were shaped like a goat's (the hair on them was glossy black) and instead of feet he had goat's hoo...