• King Lear Serving Faithfully Speaking
    817 words
    Many of the passages of King Lear, particularly those between the characters of Lear, Kent, the Fool, and Cordelia, all share a common theme. The imagery of nothing, as well as that of blindness, echoes throughout the play. King Lear is in many ways about nothing. However, Kent, the Fool, and Cordelia make him more than nothing does by serving faithfully, speaking bluntly, and loving unconditionally. The first occurrence of the imagery of nothing takes place between Lear and Cordelia. In this pa...
  • Kreon Fool Antigone Sentry
    509 words
    Ignorance In Sophocle's ancient Greek tragedy, Antigone, there is a woman who chooses to go with the feeling inside her heart and obey law of the Gods, rather than to obey civil law. Antigone's bother Eteocles was given a proper burial after a war in their homeland of Thebes. She wants her brother, Polynices, who was the enemy, also to be given a proper burial, but the king prohibits the burial. Kreon, the king, is the protagonist who displays hubris in his quest for absolute power. Without reas...
  • The Fool In King Lear
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    The Fool is a tremendously substantial character in William Shakespeare's tragedy, King Lear. Traditionally, fools were the equivalent of court jesters and were thought to be insane. They were customarily physically and sometimes even mentally impaired. Persons became fools as the result of an aristocratic individual's compassion or boredom. Often times, fools were taken in by kings and given room and board in exchange for their tomfoolery. Fools such as Lear's were never held accountable for wh...
  • Gimpel The Fool Story People School
    501 words
    Singer s Gimpel the Fool is written in first person point of view, and the narrator, Gimpel, is the main character in the story. In the opening paragraph in the story Singer shows how reliable of a narrator that Gimpel is. Gimpel shares many of the nicknames he has had given to him in school, including imbecile, donkey, flax-head, dope, glum p, ninny, and fool. He then says that he was considered a fool because he was easily taken in. He gave an example of one of the situations that earned him t...
  • A Deeper Look At Gimpel The Fool
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    A deeper look at "G imple the Fool" At one time or another, everyone, in their life, has looked down upon someone because that someone isn't as rich, attractive, or even as intelligent as most people. People do this without any regard to the people's feeling, and without ever imagining what it is like to be in that person's shoes. In Isaac Bashevis Singer's "Gimpel the Fool", a man named Gimpel was harassed and teased because of the fact he was gullible, or so the people believed. The townspeopl...
  • Gimpel The Fool Story Elka Character
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    An Analysis of Gimpel The Fool Gimpel the Fool is a story written by Isaac Bashevis Singer. Saul Bellow translated the story I read because the story was written in Yiddish. Gimpel The Fool is a story about a simple man named Gimpel. He is considered by many to be a fool because he is a very gullible man. He is constantly falling for tricks laid out by almost everyone. Gimpel is persuaded to marry Elka, a woman who will wind up using him also. Elka treats Gimpel very poorly. She has "his" child...
  • Role Of The Fool In Shakespeare's
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    ... ve forms. Ironically, the fool and the king begin to swap places. Fool has always been quick to grant Lear helpful understanding of his decisions; this establishes the question of which of the two is now the real fool. Lear asks, 'Dost thou call me a fool, boy?' to which Fool replies, 'All thy other titles thou hast given away; that thou wast born with'. The 'king has been openly debased to the level of the fool' (Willeford 218) In the brief scene five, the fool attempts to distract Lear wit...
  • The Great Gatsby 10
    347 words
    The Great Gatsby In the novel, The Great Gatsby, the eyes of Dr. T. J. Eckleburg represents god, the all seeing and all knowing god, which society, cannot fool. George Wilson believes that the advertisement's eyes are the eyes of god. 'I spoke to her,' ; he muttered, after a long silence. 'I told her she might fool me but she couldn't fool God. I took her to her to the window, and I said 'God knows what you " ve been doing everything you " ve been doing. You may fool me but you can't fool God.'...
  • The Fool And Cordelia Opposing Influences On King Lear
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    Although the Fool and Cordelia are similarly candid towards their King, they never interact in Shakespeare's King Lear, because the Fool is a chaotic influence while Cordelia is a stabilizing force. While the Fool and Cordelia both act in the Lear's best interest, it is not always evident to Lear. The Fool's actions often anger the King, and lead to an increase in his madness. On the other hand, Cordelia's actions more often soothe Lear, and coax him back into sanity. Another commonality between...
  • Gimpel The Full Fool One People
    403 words
    In almost any culture, through the study of its folklore, we are almost certain to find the story of a wise fool (Hamlet, Tom Sawyer, Claudio, Don Quixote, Van Gogh, Forest Gump). The moral of most folktales stories involves a paradox regarding the philosophical value of being dull, or pretending to be dull. So is Gimpel a fool or is he so innately wise to know that pretending to be a fool is advantageous? Let's theorize an experiment. If we set a table in the middle of a crowded park, and place...
  • Sir Andrew Fool Part Person
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    Don't Judge A Book By It's Cover Looks can be deceiving, and in the case of Sir Andrew and Feste the fool, the statement certainly applies. Looking at the personalities of these two characters throughout Twelfth Night, no one will see that each character is the exact opposite of each other. Their comparison is their contrast. The first, Sir Andrew, is of "foolish wit", who looks that part he is supposed to play on the outside. He looks sophisticated and very intelligent. Yet when actually speak...
  • Brilliant Folly The Role Of Feste
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    In William Shakespeare's comedy Twelfth Night, it is ironic how many times the fool is said to be dishonest, when, in fact, his role proves entirely opposite. Though sometimes the characters do not realize his hidden messages, the reader can instantly comprehend Feste's figurative language, which is evident in every scene in which the fool appears. Whether he is singing to Orsino, arguing with Malvolio, or playing around with Viola, Feste always manages to sneak in a few symbolic foretoken's bef...
  • King Lear Goneril And Regan
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    Question #3: Consider the wisdom of King Lear's fool. Look closely at the interplay between Lear and his fool and at the speeches of the fool, which offer instruction to the king. Look for connection the play makes between Lear's fool and the other "fools" in the play - Cordelia, Kent, and Poor Tom. King Lear's fool is undoubtedly one of the wisest characters in the play. He is not only able to accurately analyze a situation which many other characters are blind to, but he is also able to foresh...
  • King Lea The Role Of The Fool
    800 words
    In the play King Lear, by William Shakespeare, there are many intriguing characters. Perhaps the most intriguing of them all is the fool. The fool seems to exist outside the play appearing and disappearing without warning. The fool is, however, a necessary character to the evolution of Lear's character, since he is the personification of truth and reason. The fool serves to show Lear how he is going insane, as well as to attempt to delay this inevitability. The fool also demonstrates to Lear the...
  • Fools And Kings King Lear
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    Erik I rre April 26, 1999 "Fools and Kings" Shakespeare's dynamic use of irony in King Lear aids the microcosmic illustration of not only 16 th century Britain, but of all times and places. The theme that best develops this illustration is the discussion of fools and their foolishness. This discussion allows Shakespeare not only to portray human nature, but also to elicit a sort of Socratic introspection into the nature of society's own ignorance as well. One type of fool that Shakespeare involv...
  • Death Of An Anarchist Response
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    Accidental Death of an Anarchist Comedic plays are able to make some loud messages while avoiding being too serious. In fact, comedic plays are said to have made the loudest messages out of all genres in theatre. One fine example of a play like this is Accidental Death of an Anarchist. Written by Dario Fo, this comedic farce takes pokes at the governmental system and how police deal with criminals. It was originally performed on December 5 th, 1970, but it's been rewritten twice since then so t...
  • Comparison Of Nobody's Fool An Last Of The Mohicans
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    In "Nobody's Fool" and "The Last of the Mohicans", the Hudson Valley's presence is very prominent, though the way it is offered is very different. In Richard Russo's "Nobody's Fool", change and the dysfunctional family are very visible. The Hudson Valley is very present in both "Nobody's Fool" and "The Last of the Mohicans." In "Nobody's Fool", the Hudson Valley does not physically change but is representative of how many communities are in the Hudson Valley and the people that make them up. You...
  • Feste A Fool With A Major Role
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    In Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, Feste, the fool, is not a main character; he does play a major role within the play. Like many of Shakespeare's other clowns and fools, Feste provides the audience with amusement and a realistic view of Elizabethan society. While he does play the role of the fool, Feste seems to make many statements throughout the play indicating that he is quite intelligent. His way with words and general knowledge suggests that he is actually very bright and well read. Feste som...
  • King Lear Essay Fool Character Reason
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    Shakespeare provides an assortment of characters in King Lear. These colorful players are categorized as being either: a major character, a minor character or a foil character. In King Lear, there is more to the fool then what is portrayed. A fool is suppose to be a playful jester, someone without a reason with the sole purpose to entertain an audience. Lear's fool is a mysterious character that appears only for a short while. Within that time frame, the fool serves an important purpose. The fo...
  • A Study Of The Fool In Twelfth Night
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    A fool can be defined in many meanings according to the Oxford English Dictionary On Historical Principles. The word could mean "a silly person", or "one who professionally counterfeits folly for the entertainment of others, a jester, clown" or "one who has little or no reason or intellect" or "one who is made to appear to be a fool" (word originated from North Frisian). In William Shakespeare's comedy, Twelfth Night, Feste the clown is not the only fool who is subject to foolery. He and many ot...