• New Ending Of Romeo And Juliet
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    New Ending Act V, Scene III Verona. A churchyard; the monument of the Capulets. Enter Romeo and Paris. Paris This is that banished haughty Montague, That murdered my love's cousin, with which grief It is supposed that fair creature died, And here is come to do some villainous shame To the dead bodies. I will apprehend him. Stop thy unhallowed toil vile Montague. Can vengeance be pursued further than death? Condemned villi an, I do apprehend thee. Obey and go with me, for thou must die. Romeo mu...
  • Dear Shakespeare A Critique Of The Tempest
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    Dear Shakespeare: A Critique of The Tempest To Mr. William Shakespeare, I am going to get right down to business. I am writing to you regarding our recent collaboration on The Tempest. In my opinion I think we need to make a couple of changes. The first is in regards to Caliban and the second has to do with Prospero. As I was reading the section of the play where Caliban takes Stephano ash is master I began to think about how he should be wiser by now. As is Caliban begs a drunken Stephano to b...
  • Lovers Are Fool Love Demetrius Line
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    A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare In Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" the mortal teenage characters fall in love foolishly, and the character Bottom states, "O what fools these mortals be." They are foolish because they act like children. Although Lysander, Hermia, Demetrius, and Helena appear grown-up, when they are in love they act foolishly. The four teenage lovers are fools. Demetrius is a fool because he is unaware that his love changes through out the play. At the s...
  • Thou Art Thee God Augustine
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    But the old habits were still strong and he could not muster a full act of the whole will to strike them down. Then comes the scene in the Milanese garden which is an interesting parallel to Ponticianus's tory about the garden at Trees. The long struggle is recapitulated in a brief moment; his will struggles against and within itself. The trivial distraction of a child's voice, chanting, 'Tolle, lege,' precipitates the resolution of the conflict. There is a radical shift in mood and will, he tu...
  • What Sort Of A King Was Duncan
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    We were not told an awful lot about Duncan in Shakespeare Macbeth. He had very few lines, and appeared on only a few occasions. Despite this, I was able to gather a fair idea of Duncan character, through the interpretation of messages hidden within the text. Duncan was a kind and good man. There are several segments of the play that show this; as I have demonstrated below. Duncan is an extremely trustworthy King of his fellow men. He trusts his men with his life, his children, his throne, and m...
  • Wouldst Thou Thine Fate Couldst
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    Capulet: What be mine fate... ? Prince: capulet, thou'r't nothing but a blind cretin. How couldst thou let such a thing happen to thine only daughter. How dare thee? To stand in the way of what couldst only have been a pure and true love. To let thy petty bickering take two innocent lives... Thou hast forgotten that the path of fate can be altered, if one has the ability to let go of ignorance, and look deeply unto what is happening in the lives of those who are near. Now think what thou will.....
  • Aphrodite Invocation Hearts Entwining Thou
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    Oh Muse! With visions Thou hast filled my soul, With visions overpowering, for Thou Hast shown me Golden Aphrodite; now The blaze emboldens me; like coal To brighter burning fanned by Breath Divine, The Cyprian me with words, Seductive sounds, which swiftly would entwine My soul, as lime-twigs trap unwary birds. An Ancient Poet spake the truth; he said When Cypris cometh swift, high-spirited Just like a Hero -- irresistible Her onslaught, nor may anyone annul Her summons; flouting Her is arrogan...
  • Interpretation Of Poetic Sound
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    Understanding the Speaker's Voice: Through Interpretation of Poetic Sound Classical, Early European, Eastern and Modern poetry share structural similarities in their use of rhythm, meter and rhyme; however, sound plays a more subtle role for purposes of interpretation. Poets combine structured rhythmic patterns and the formal arrangement of words with devices such as alliteration to create images in the reader's mind. Two contrasting poems written by William Blake titled "The Lamb" from Songs of...
  • Kingdom Of God Jesus Born Man
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    According to John the third chapter, there was a man of the Pharisees, named Nicodemus, a ruler of the jews. The same came to Jesus by night, and said unto to him, Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God: for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him. Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, Verily, I say to thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. Then Nicodemus asked, How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter the seco...
  • Lord God Thou Hath Isa
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    The Covenant of Redemption By and Between the Trinity 2 TI 1: 9 Who hath saved us, and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began, The Son said: " thou love dst me before the foundation of the world"Then I was by him, as one brought up with him: and I was daily his delight, rejoicing always before him;" .".. from the time that it was, there am I. ." JOH 17: 24 PRO 8: 30 ISA 48: ...
  • Tyger And Lamb Comparison
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    The gentle lamb and the menacing tyger in Blake s Songs of Innocence and Experience shows the contrast between the innocence of childhood and the experience of adulthood. The first two lines of. The Lamb sets the style of childish inquisitiveness, Little Lamb who made thee/Doubt thou know who made thee (1-2) The poem is divided into two stanzas, the first containing the questions about who made the little lamb and about, Who gave thee clothing of delight/Softest clothing wooly bright (5-6) gives...
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning Bio
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    ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING There are many famous women poets in English History. A very honored poet is Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, an English poet, as well as an invalid, wrote many great works, such as her well known Sonnets From the Portuguese which included on of her most famous poems, How Do I Love Thee Elizabeth Barrett Browning was born at Cox hoe Hall, Durham, England on March 6, 1806. She was the oldest of 12 children born to Edward and Mary Barrett. Elizabet...
  • The Lamb William Blake
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    WILLIAM BLAKE William Blake was born on 1757. He grew up in the middle of London. Since Blake lived in a bad part of the neighborhood, he was poorly educated. Around the age of ten his father had enough money to send him to drawing school and then at fourteen he became an engraver. Blake realized that he was not any good at being artistic. Starting in 1778 Blake began making a living by giving booksellers and publishers with copperphte engravings. In Blake s later years he began to write The Ga...
  • Oedipus Rex Sophocles Messenger Jocasta Thee
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    JOCASTA My lords look amazed to see your queen with wreaths and gifts of incense in her hands. I had a mind to visit the high shrines, for Oedipus is nervous, alarmed with various terrors. He will not use his past experience, like a man of sense, to judge the present need, but lends his ear to any croaker that argues. Since then my counsels dont have an advantage, I turn to thee, our help when we are in trouble, Apollo, Lord Lycian, and to you my prayers and pleas I bring. Ease us, lord, and cl...
  • Anne Bradstreetexplicationthe Author To Her Book
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    Explication - Anne Bradstreet "The Author to her Book" The overall explanation the poem" The Author to Her Book" by Anne Bradstreet is that " her poem is a rambling brat." Anne Bradstreet's poem was never meant to be published. Examples of other metaphors are:" ill-formed offspring of my feeble brain " these were words that she came up with in her mind. " Who afterbirth didst by my side remain," means the poem stayed in rough draft form with her and had no intention of bring published. " Till sn...
  • Thy One Thee Soul
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    To my fellow poet John Donne, I write to inform thee of ye superb composition aptly titled "Meditation XVII." Ideas coming from only deep thought, with thy apparent knowledge of the number of people who fathom daily, gives thee right to call it a meditation. In thy account, ye dictates of a spiritual calling God yarns for thee, solely revealing itself through series of hardships and troubles. Even though they are all close and sincere to thee, thy addiction to all things sweet is apparent. True ...
  • Lamb God Blake Speaker
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    The Tyger vs. The Lamb Blake thought that a poet was a prophet and the poetry that the poet wrote was a prophecy. Through his theory, reintegration of human life was possible. In Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience, it seems that there are opposing views of God in the poems of The Tyger and The Lamb. The speaker in each poem shows their view of God himself. In The Tyger, it seems like the speaker is wondering if God can be both loving and angry, where as the speaker in The Lamb seems to sa...
  • Killing A Human Abortion Women Georgia
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    Should it be legal for women to have abortions in the state of Georgia? This has been a controversial question for many years now. Some people don't even think twice about having an abortion. Others have a lot to say about the subject. For instance, not only is abortion murder, but it is also a sin despite the current law in Georgia. One reason why abortion should be illegal in Georgia is that the Bible says that it is wrong. Abortion is killing a human being. The Bible says, "Thou shalt not ki...
  • Night Dream Oberon Titania Bottom
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    A Midsummer's Night Dream A Midsummer's Night Dream Essay, Research Paper Magic, the supernatural or unexplained, serves as an aid in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer's Night Dream. For example, since Oberon uses a supernatural flower, and in his description of it to Puck he noted it's magical function, The juice of it on sleeping eye-lids laid / Will make a man or woman madly dote / Upon the next live creatures it sees (Act II Scene i), he wins Titania's favor. Even though Oberon himself is on...
  • Grecian Urn Friend Shakespeare Beauty
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    A Word Is Worth A Thousand Pictures? A Word Is Worth A Thousand Pictures? – Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 And Keats' Grecian Urn A Word Is Worth a Thousand Pictures? – Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 and Keats' Grecian Urn Shakespeare's sonnet 18 ("Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?' ) and Keats' "Ode on a Grecian Urn' were written with a common purpose in mind; to immortalize the subjects of their poems by writing them down in verses for people to read for generations to come. By doing so, b...