• Hallucinations Illegal Drug
    431 words
    Hallucinations Hallucinations are defined as a perception of and external object when no object is really present. There are many reasons why people have hallucinations. Some reasons for hallucinations are prescribed drugs (SSRI), illegal drugs (LSD), and sleeping disorders (Narcolepsy). Some causes of hallucinations are from taking drugs, both prescribed and illegal. Both produce the same effect. The hallucinations from these have been described as d'ej'a vu or hearing or seeing thing that aren...
  • Gateway Drugs Drug Cocaine Lsd
    1,926 words
    Gateway Drugs and Common Drug Abuse The oldest known written record of drug use is a clay tablet from the ancient Sumerian civilization of the Middle East. This tablet, made in the 2000's B. C. , lists about a dozen drug prescriptions. An Egyptian scroll from bout 1550 B. C. names more than 800 prescriptions containing about 700 drugs. The ancient Chinese, Greek and Romans also used many drugs. The Greeks and Romans used opium to relieve pain. The Egyptians used castor oil as a laxative. The Ch...
  • Hallucinogen Lsd Hallucinogens Effects
    920 words
    Hallucinogen While many drugs speed up or depress the central nervous system, there is a class of drugs that distorts how we feel, hear, see, smell, taste, and think. Called hallucinogens because users often hallucinate, or experience nonexistent sensations, these drugs are also known as psychedelic, or mind-bending, drugs. Some hallucinogens come from natural sources; others are made in laboratories. Examples of natural hallucinogens are mescaline, psilocybin, DMT, and marijuana. Mescaline, whi...
  • Hallucinogens Bad Trip
    1,510 words
    Hallucinogens or psychedelics are mind-altering drugs, which affect the mind's perceptions, causing bizarre, unpredictable behavior, and severe, sensory disturbances that may place users at risk of serious injuries or death. Hallucinogens powerfully affect the brain, distorting the way our five senses work and changes our impressions of time and space. People who use these drugs a lot may have a hard time concentrating, communicating, or telling the difference between reality and illusion. Hallu...
  • Lsd And The Cia
    426 words
    LSD was invented in Switzerland by Albert Hofmann, a researcher for Sandoz pharmaceuticals. It did not spontaneously appear among the youth of the Western world as a gift from the God of Gettin' High. The CIA was on to acid long before the flower children. So, for that matter, were upstanding citizens like Time-Life magnate Henry Luce and his wife, Clare Boothe Luce, who openly sang the praises of their magical mystery tours during the early sixties. Henry, a staunch conservative with close conn...
  • Hippie Culture Fabulous Century
    1,871 words
    The Hippie Culture Many generations have come and gone, and many have made an impact on American life. The Sixties were definitely one of those generations that left its mark in history. The people of this generation didn't follow the teachings of its elders, but rejected them for an alternative culture, which was their very own (Harris 14). This new subculture was such a radical society that it was given it's own name which is still used to this day. They came to be known as, the Hippies. The ...
  • Timothy Leary Lsd Life Marwick
    1,007 words
    Timothy Leary "Turn on, tune in, drop out." That saying has turned into the slogan of Timothy Leary mind-expanding movement. Although a graduate of both West-Point and Berkley, and a Harvard professor, these were not his greatest lifetime achievements. Throughout his publicized life, he became the spokesperson of the psychedelic age. His devotion to the belief that LSD and marijuana were gateways to enlightenment resulted in a new church, numerous prison sentences, and a following of both celebr...
  • Mescaline And Peyote Lsd Effects Give
    485 words
    Mescaline comes from the Mexican peyote cactus, which is small, spore less cactus that grows in the deserts of Mexico and the American Southwest. Whenever the crown is sliced and dried, it forms a hard brownish disc that's known as a button. The buttons are chewed for its hallucegenic properties. The Indians first chewed them in the sixteenth century for religious and spiritual purposes, but when Spaniards reached the New World they outlawed peyotism which they thought had something to do with w...
  • Act For The Drug
    270 words
    Harrison Act (1914) – 1 st fed law to regulate to free distribution of opium or drugs Opium Poppy Act (1942) – Prohibits growing opium Except for the license Narcotics Control Act (1956) – imposes server penalties for convicted of narcotics or weed charges. Drug Abuse Control Amendment (1965) – adapts strict controls over LSD, amphetamines Comprehensive Prevention Control Act (1970) – replaces all laws concerning narcotics. Drug Offenders Act (1984) – set up s...
  • Aldous Huxley Leonard Philosopher Lsd
    1,018 words
    Many Aldous Huxley Aldous Huxley Many talented twentieth century writers have been overshadowed by classical writers such as Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare. Novels dealing with classical topics are often more recognized than works that tackle controversial topics. Aldous Huxley defies this stereotype, for his controversial works gained great fame while influencing many people. Huxley was not just a successful writer; he was a complex person whose ideas and novels influenced many people....